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Author: BROOKS, GWENDOLYN
Matches Found: 93


Brooks, Gwendolyn    Poet's Biography
93 poems available by this author


A BRONZEVILLE MOTHER LOITERS IN MISSISSIPPI    Poem Text    
First Line: From the first it had been like a / ballad
Subject(s): African Americans - Women


A LIGHT AND DIPLOMATIC BIRD    Poem Text    


A PENITENT CONSIDERS ANOTHER COMING OF MARY    Poem Text    
First Line: If mary came would mary / forgive, as mothers may
Last Line: If mary came again
Subject(s): Christmas; Nativity, The


A SONG IN THE FRONT YARD    Poem Text     Recitation by Author
First Line: I've stayed in the front yard all my life
Last Line: And strut down the streets with paint on my face.
Subject(s): Children; Childhood


A SUNSET OF THE CITY    Poem Text     Recitation
First Line: Already I am no longer looked at with lechery or love.
Subject(s): Aging; Family Life; Relatives


ANDRE    Poem Text    
First Line: I had a dream last night. I dreamed
Last Line: They were the ones I always had!
Subject(s): African Americans; Family Life; Negroes; American Blacks; Relatives


APPENDIX TO THE ANNIAD: 1 (THOUSANDS - KILLED IN ACTION)    Poem Text    
First Line: You need the untranslatable ice to watch
Last Line: Why nothing exhausts you like this sympathy
Subject(s): War


APPENDIX TO THE ANNIAD: 2    Poem Text    
First Line: The certainty we two shall meet by god
Last Line: Bees in the stomach, sweat across the brow. Now
Subject(s): African Americans - Women


BEVERLY HILLS, CHICAGO    Poem Text    
First Line: The dry brown coughing beneath their feet
Last Line: When we speak to each other our voices are a little gruff
Subject(s): Social Classes; Caste


BOY BREAKING GLASS    Poem Text    
First Line: Whose broken window is a cry of art
Subject(s): Crime & Criminals


BRONZEVILLE WOMAN IN A RED HAT    Poem Text    
First Line: They had never had one in the house before
Last Line: Child, big black woman, pretty kitchen towels
Subject(s): African Americans - Women; Household Employees; Servants; Domestics; Maids


BUILDING    Poem Text    
First Line: When I see a brave building
Last Line: Here it stands
Subject(s): Buildings & Builders


FIRSTLY INCLINED TO TAKE WHAT IT IS TOLD    Poem Text    
First Line: Thee sacrosanct, - thee sweet, thee crystalline
Last Line: I had been brightly ready to believe
Subject(s): African Americans - Military


GAY CHAPS AT THE BAR    Poem Text    
First Line: We knew how to order. Just the dash
Last Line: To holler down the lions in this air
Subject(s): African Americans - Military


GAY CHAPS AT THE BAR: PIANO AFTER WAR    Poem Text    
First Line: On a snug evening I shall watch her fingers
Variant Title(s): Piano After War
Subject(s): African Americans - Military; Musical Instruments; Pianos


GAY CHAPS AT THE BAR: THE WHITE TROOPS HAD THEIR ORDERS ...    Poem Text    
First Line: They had supposed their formula was fixed
Subject(s): African Americans - Military


GOD WORKS IN A MYSTERIOUS WAY'    Poem Text    
First Line: But often now the youthful eye cuts down its
Last Line: Or we assume a sovereignty ourselves
Subject(s): African Americans - Military


HENRY RAGO    Poem Text    
First Line: Of people, these


HUNCHBACK GIRL: SHE THINKS OF HEAVEN    Poem Text    
First Line: My father, it is surely a blue place
Last Line: Proper myself, princess of properness.
Subject(s): Physical Disabilities; Handicapped; Handicaps; Physically Challenged; Cripples


IN HONOR OF DAVID ANDERSON BROOKS, MY FATHER    Poem Text    
First Line: A dryness is upon the house
Last Line: Old private charity
Subject(s): Fathers & Daughters


JANE ADDAMS    Poem Text     Recitation by Author
First Line: I am jane addams
Last Line: So speaks a giant. Jane
Subject(s): Addams, Jane (1860-1935); Reform & Reformers


JESSIE MITCHELL€™S MOTHER    Poem Text    
Subject(s): Mothers & Daughters; Youth


KITCHENETTE BUILDING    Poem Text     Recitation by Author
First Line: We are things of dry hours and the involuntary plan
Last Line: We think of lukewarm water, hope to get in it.
Subject(s): African Americans; Negroes; American Blacks


LOOKING    Poem Text    
First Line: You have no word for soldiers to enjoy
Last Line: Nor the heaviest haul your little boy from harm
Subject(s): African Americans - Military


LOVE NOTE: 1. SURELY    Poem Text    
First Line: Surely you stay my certain own, you say
Last Line: And I doubt all. You. Or a violet
Subject(s): African Americans - Military


LOVE NOTE: 2. FLAGS    Poem Text    
First Line: Still, it is dear defiance now to carry
Last Line: Or like the tender struggle of a fan
Subject(s): African Americans – Military; Forgiveness


MALCOLM X    Poem Text    
First Line: Original / ragged-round
Subject(s): African Americans; Malcolm X (Malcolm Little) (1925-1965); Negroes; American Blacks


MAYOR HAROLD WASHINGTON    Poem Text    
First Line: Mayor. Worldman. Historyman
Subject(s): Politics And Politicians; Washington, Harold (1922-1987)


MEDGAR EVERS    Poem Text    
First Line: The man whose height his fear improved he
Subject(s): Civil Rights Movement; Evers, Medgar (1925-1963)


MENTORS    Poem Text    
First Line: For I am rightful fellow of their band
Last Line: Light is the midnight for mine and theirs
Subject(s): African Americans - Military


MEXIE AND BRIDIE    Poem Text    
First Line: A tiny tea-party
Last Line: Tea-ing in the town
Subject(s): Girls


MICHAEL IS AFRAID OF THE STORM    Poem Text    
First Line: Lightning is angry in the night
Last Line: No one will laugh, I guess
Subject(s): Storms


MRS. SMALL    Poem Text    
First Line: Mrs. Small went to the kitchen for her pocketbook
Last Line: Of the world's business
Subject(s): Women's Rights; African Americans – Women; Insurance & Insurance Agents


MY DREAMS, MY WORKS, MUST WAIT TILL AFTER HELL    Poem Text    
First Line: I hold my honey and I store my bread
Subject(s): African Americans - Military


NARCISSA    Poem Text    
First Line: Some of the girls are playing jacks
Last Line: As anyone ever sat!
Subject(s): Girls


OF DE WITT WILLIAMS ON HIS WAY TO LINCOLN CEMETERY    Poem Text     Recitation by Author
First Line: He was born in alabama
Last Line: Nothing but a plain black boy.
Subject(s): African Americans; Negroes; American Blacks


OF ROBERT FROST    Poem Text    
First Line: There is a little lightning in his eyes
Last Line: Some specialness within
Subject(s): Frost, Robert (1874-1963); Poetry & Poets


OLD MARY    Poem Text    
First Line: My last defense
Subject(s): Old Age


OLD PEOPLE WORKING (GARDEN, CAR)    Poem Text    
First Line: Old people working. Making a gift of garden
Last Line: A way of greeting or sally to the crowd
Subject(s): Labor & Laborers; Work; Workers


PETE AT THE ZOO    Poem Text    
First Line: I wonder if the elephant
Last Line: Against the dark of night
Subject(s): Elephants; Zoos


PRIMER FOR BLACKS    Poem Text    
First Line: Blackness/is a title
Subject(s): African Americans; Negroes; American Blacks


QUEEN OF THE BLUES    Poem Text    
First Line: Mame was singing
Last Line: Their hats to a queen?
Subject(s): Blues (Music); Jazz; Music & Musicians; Singing & Singers; Songs


RIOT    Poem Text    
First Line: John cabot, out of wilma, once a wycliffe
Subject(s): African Americans; Civil Rights Movement; Negroes; American Blacks


SADIE AND MAUD    Poem Text    
First Line: Maud went to college
Last Line: In this old house.
Subject(s): African Americans - Women


SPEECH TO THE YOUNG. SPEECH TO THE PROGRESS-TOWARD    Poem Text    
First Line: Say to them
Last Line: Live in the along
Subject(s): Youth


STILL DO I KEEP MY LOOK, MY IDENTITY    Poem Text    
First Line: Each body has its art, its precious prescribed
Last Line: It showed at baseball. What it showed in school
Variant Title(s): Still Do I Keep My Look, My Identity
Subject(s): African Americans - Military


STILL DO I KEEP MY LOOK, MY IDENTITY €¦    Poem Text    
First Line: Each body has its art, its precious prescribed
Subject(s): Identity


STRONG MEN, RIDING HORSES    Poem Text    
First Line: Strong men, riding horses. In the west


THE ANNIAD    Poem Text    
First Line: Think of sweet and chocolate
Last Line: The minuets of memory
Subject(s): African Americans – Women; Virgil (70-19 B.c.)


THE ARTISTS' AND MODELS' BALL    Poem Text    
First Line: Wonders do not confuse. We call them that
Last Line: Our backs they alter. How were we to know
Subject(s): African Americans; Negroes; American Blacks


THE ASSASSINATION OF JOHN F. KENNEDY    Poem Text    
First Line: I hear things crying in the world
Last Line: The tilt and jangle of this death
Subject(s): Kennedy, John Fitzgerald (1917-1963)


THE BALLAD OF RUDOLPH REED    Poem Text    
First Line: Rudolph reed was oaken
Subject(s): Racism; Racial Prejudice; Bigotry


THE BEAN EATERS    Poem Text    
First Line: They eat beans mostly, this old yellow pair
Last Line: Tobacco crumbs, vases and fringes.
Subject(s): African Americans - Women; Farm Life; Old Age; United States; Women; Agriculture; Farmers; America


THE BIRTH IN A NARROW ROOM    Poem Text    
First Line: Weeps out of western country something new
Subject(s): African Americans - Women; Birth; Child Birth; Midwifery


THE BLACKSTONE RANGERS: 1. AS SEEN BY DISCIPLINES    Poem Text    
First Line: There they are


THE BLACKSTONE RANGERS: 2. THE LEADERS    Poem Text    
First Line: Jeff. Gene. Geronimo. And bop
Subject(s): African Americans - Children


THE BLACKSTONE RANGERS: 3. GANG GIRLS; A RANGERETTE    Poem Text    
First Line: Gang girls are sweet exotics
Subject(s): African Americans - Women


THE BOY DIED IN MY ALLEY    Poem Text    
First Line: Without my having known
Subject(s): Death; Dead, The


THE CHICAGO DEFENDER SENDS A MAN TO LITTLE ROCK, FALL, 1957    Poem Text    
First Line: In little rock the people bear / babes, and comb and part their hair
Variant Title(s): The Chicago Defender Sends A Man To Little Rock
Subject(s): African Americans; Civil Rights Movement; Negroes; American Blacks


THE CHICAGO PICASSO, AUGUST 15, 1967    Poem Text    
First Line: Does man love art? Man visits art, squirms
Subject(s): Art & Artists; Picasso, Pablo (1881-1973); Sculpture & Sculptors


THE CHILDREN OF THE POOR    Poem Text     Recitation
First Line: People who have no children can be hard
Last Line: Holding the bandage ready for your eyes
Variant Title(s): "people Who Have No Children Can Be Hard"";
Subject(s): African Americans; Negroes; American Blacks


THE COORA FLOWER    Poem Text    
First Line: Now I am coming home
Subject(s): Homecoming


THE CRAZY WOMAN    Poem Text    
First Line: I shall not sing a may song
Last Line: Who would not sing in may
Subject(s): Women


THE EGG BOILER    Poem Text    
First Line: Being you, you cut your poetry from wood
Last Line: You watch us, eat your egg, and laugh aloud
Subject(s): Eggs


THE EMPTY WOMAN    Poem Text    
First Line: The empty woman took toys!
Last Line: And bouffants that bustle, and rustle
Subject(s): Infertility


THE LAST QUATRAIN OF THE BALLAD OF EMMETT TILL    Poem Text    
First Line: After the murder, / after the burial
Subject(s): African Americans - Children; Lynching; Till, Emmett (1941-1955)


THE LIFE OF LINCOLN WEST    Poem Text    
First Line: Ugliest little boy
Last Line: It comforted him
Subject(s): African Americans - Children


THE LOVERS OF THE POOR    Poem Text    
First Line: Arrive. The ladies from the ladies's betterment league
Variant Title(s): "the Lovers Of The Poor Arrive"";
Subject(s): Poverty


THE MAMA        Recitation by Author


THE MOTHER    Poem Text    
First Line: Abortions will not let you forget
Last Line: All.
Subject(s): Abortion; African Americans; African Americans - Women; Mothers; Negroes; American Blacks


THE NEAR-JOHANNESBURG BOY    Poem Text    
First Line: My way is from woe to wonder
Subject(s): South Africa


THE PREACHER: RUMINATES BEHIND THE SERMON    Poem Text    
First Line: I think it must be lonely to be god
Last Line: In solitude. Without a hand to hold.
Subject(s): African Americans; God; Negroes; American Blacks


THE PROGRESS    Poem Text    
First Line: And still we wear our uniforms, follow
Last Line: Of iron feet again. And again wild
Variant Title(s): Gay Chaps At The Bar;the Progress
Subject(s): African Americans - Military


THE RITES FOR COUSIN VIT    Poem Text    
First Line: Carried her unprotesting out the door
Subject(s): Funerals; Burials


THE SECOND SERMON ON THE WARPLAND    Poem Text    
First Line: This is the urgency: live!
Last Line: Conduct your blooming in the noise and whip of the whirlwind.
Subject(s): African Americans - Women


THE SERMON ON THE WARPLAND    Poem Text    
First Line: And several strengths from drowsiness campaigned
Last Line: "complete; continuous."
Subject(s): African Americans; Negroes; American Blacks


THE SONNET-BALLAD    Poem Text    
First Line: Oh mother, mother, where is happiness?
Subject(s): Happiness; Mothers; Joy; Delight


THE SUNDAYS OF SATIN-LEGS SMITH    Poem Text    
First Line: Inamoratas, with an approbation
Subject(s): African Americans; Jazz; Music & Musicians; Negroes; American Blacks


THE THIRD SERMON ON THE WARPLAND    Poem Text    
First Line: The earth is a beautiful place
Last Line: You could make music too / the blackblues
Subject(s): African Americans - Song & Music; Jazz; Music & Musicians; Phoenix (Mythical Bird)


THE VACANT LOT    Poem Text    
Last Line: And letting them out again.
Subject(s): Family Life; Relatives


THE WALL    Poem Text    
First Line: A drumdrumdrum.


TO AN OLD BLACK WOMAN, HOMELESS AND INDISTINCT       
First Line: Your every day is a pilgrimage
Subject(s): African Americans - Women; Homeless; Women – Old Age


TO BE IN LOVE    Poem Text     Recitation
First Line: To be in love / is to touch things with a lighter hand
Last Line: Into the commonest ash
Subject(s): Love


TO THE DIASPORA: MUSIC FOR MARTYRS    Poem Text    
First Line: I feel a regret, steve biko
Last Line: Of your tracts, your triumphs, your tribulations
Subject(s): Biko, Steve (1946-1977)


TO THE DIASPORA: YOU DID NOT KNOW YOU WERE AFRIKA    Poem Text    
First Line: When you set out for afrika
Last Line: Your work, that was done, to be done to be done to be done
Subject(s): African Americans; Ancestors & Ancestry; Negroes; American Blacks; Heritage; Heredity


TO THOSE OF MY SISTERS WHO KEPT THEIR NATURALS    Poem Text    
First Line: Sisters! I love you
Subject(s): African Americans - Women; Conformity; Pride; Self-esteem; Self-respect


TRUTH    Poem Text    
First Line: And if sun comes


VERN    Poem Text    
First Line: When walking in a tiny rain
Last Line: Nor mock the tears you have to hide
Subject(s): Animals; Dogs; Friendship


WE REAL COOL; THE POOL PLAYERS. SEVEN AT THE GOLDEN SHOVEL    Poem Text     Recitation by Author
First Line: We real cool. We / left school. We
Last Line: Die soon.
Variant Title(s): We Real Cool
Subject(s): African Americans; African Americans - Children; Americans; Death; Labor & Laborers; Men; United States; Youth; Negroes; American Blacks; Dead, The; Work; Workers; America


WHITNEY YOUNG       
First Line: Whitney, you were a candid structure hulking in event
Subject(s): Civil Rights Movement; Fortitude; Young, Whitney Moore, Jr. (1921-1971)


WINNIE    Poem Text    
First Line: Winnie mandela, she
Last Line: I nelson the mandela tell you so
Subject(s): Mandela, Winnie (B. 1934)


YOUNG AFRIKANS    Poem Text    
First Line: Who take today and jerk it out of joint
Variant Title(s): Young Africans
Subject(s): African Americans; Negroes; American Blacks


YOUNG HEROES - I    Poem Text    
First Line: He is very busy with his looking
Subject(s): South Africa - Anti-apartheid Movement