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Author: LOVELACE, rICHARD
Matches Found: 105


Lovelace, Richard    Poet's Biography
105 poems available by this author


A BLACK PATCH ON LUCASTA'S FACE (1)    Poem Text    
First Line: Dull as I was, to think that a court fly
Last Line: But the sweet little bees large monument.
Subject(s): Bees; Faces; Insects; Beekeeping; Bugs


A BLACK PATCH ON LUCASTA'S FACE (2)    Poem Text    
First Line: As I beheld a winter's evening air
Last Line: Only a cloud or two hangs here and there.
Subject(s): Faces


A DIALOGUE: LUTE AND VOICE    Poem Text    
First Line: Sing, laura, whilst silent are the spheres
Last Line: And the high heav'n to stoop to hell?


A FLY ABOUT A GLASS OF BURNT CLARET    Poem Text    
First Line: Forbear this liquid fire, fly
Last Line: Thou wouldst be scorched and drowned again!
Subject(s): Flies


A FLY CAUGHT IN A COBWEB    Poem Text    
First Line: Small type of great ones, that do hum
Last Line: Bound with the entrails of thy foe.
Subject(s): Cobwebs; Flies


A FORSAKEN LADY TO HER FALSE SERVANT THAT IS DISDAINED BY NEW MISTRESS    Poem Text    
First Line: Were it that you so shun me 'cause you wish
Last Line: Oh, make me choose rather to freeze than burn.
Subject(s): Love - Complaints


A GUILTLESS LADY IMPRISONED; AFTER, PENANCED; SONG    Poem Text    
First Line: Hark, fair one, how whate'er here is
Last Line: Are bound to thee, to bind such hands.


A LA BOURBON    Poem Text    
First Line: Divine destroyer, pity me no more
Last Line: Frown death immediately.
Subject(s): Love - Unrequited


A LADY WITH A FALCON ON HER FIST; TO THE INCOMPARABLE ANNE LOVELACEU    Poem Text    
First Line: This queen of prey (now prey to you)
Last Line: In which the nobler is the she.
Subject(s): Falcons


A LOOSE SARABAND (1)    Poem Text    
First Line: Nay, prithee dear, draw nigher
Last Line: Leave me but love and sherry.
Subject(s): Alcoholism & Alcoholics; Love; Drunkards; Alcohol Abuse


A LOOSE SARABAND (2)    Poem Text    
First Line: Ah me! The little tyrant thief!
Last Line: There proudly sits enthroned.


A MOCK CHARON; DIALOGUE: CHARON, WHARTON    Poem Text    
First Line: Charon! Thou slave! Thou fool! Thou cavalier!
Last Line: And softly, softly breathe, lest you infect us too.
Subject(s): Charon; Styx (River)


A MOCK SONG    Poem Text    
First Line: Now whitehall's in the grave
Last Line: For our dragon hath vanquish'd the st. George.


A PARADOX    Poem Text    
First Line: Tis true the beauteous star
Last Line: To love a bear or cow.


A PROLOGUE TO 'THE SCHOLARS', A COMEDY PRESENTED AT THE WHITEFRIARS    Poem Text    
First Line: A gentleman, to give us somewhat new
Last Line: They reach him that themselves must envy at.


ADVICE TO MY BEST BROTHER, COLONEL FRANCIS LOVELACE    Poem Text    
First Line: Frank, wilt live handsomely? Trust not too far
Last Line: A cloudy tempest, and a too fair day.
Subject(s): Advice; Human Behavior; Conduct Of Life; Human Nature


AGAINST THE LOVE OF GREAT ONES    Poem Text    
First Line: Unhappy youth, betray'd by fate
Last Line: The torch laughs piecemeal to consume.


AMYNTOR'S GROVE, HIS CHLORIS, ARIGO, AND GRATIANA    Poem Text    
First Line: It was amyntor's grove, that chloris
Last Line: Till th' scythe is snatch'd away from time.


AMYNTOR, FROM BEYOND THE SEA, TO ALEXIS; A DIALOGUE    Poem Text    
First Line: Alexis! Ah alexis! Can it be
Last Line: I move in mine own element.


AN ANNIVERSARY [ON THE HYMNALS OF MY NOBLE KINSMAN]    Poem Text    
First Line: The day is curled about again
Last Line: Thousands of new-born loves with your chaste eyes.
Subject(s): Stanley, Thomas (1625-1678)


AN ELEGY: PRINCESS KATHERINE BORN, CHRISTENED, BURIED IN ONE DAY    Poem Text    
First Line: You that can aptly mix your joys with cries
Last Line: Resign our office to the hierarchy.
Subject(s): Death - Children; Death - Babies


ARAMANTHA    Poem Text    
First Line: Up with the jolly bird of light
Last Line: And separated minds can tell.


BEING TREATED; TO ELLINDA    Poem Text    
First Line: For cherries plenty, and for corans
Last Line: Lovelace richard.


CALLING LUCASTA FROM HER RETIREMENT    Poem Text    
First Line: From the dire monument of thy black room
Last Line: What they not feel must not be said to know.


CLITOPHON AND LEUCIPPE TRANSLATED; TO THE LADIES    Poem Text    
First Line: Pray ladies, breathe, awhile lay by
Last Line: In english meet to wait on you.


COURANTE MONSIEUR    Poem Text    
First Line: That frown, aminta, now hath drown'd
Last Line: By any scorching, but a melting eye.


CUPID FAR GONE    Poem Text    
First Line: What so beyond all madness is the elf
Last Line: Must leash'd t' himself with him a-hunting go.
Subject(s): Cupid; Eros


DIALOGUE: LUCASTA, ALEXIS    Poem Text    
First Line: Tell me, alexis, what this parting is
Last Line: But time nor fate can part us joined thus.
Subject(s): Farewell; Togetherness; Parting


ELEGY ON THE DEATH OF CASSANDRA COTTON, ONLY SISTER OF CHARLES COTTON    Poem Text    
First Line: Hither with hallow'd steps as is the ground
Last Line: You are more dead and buried than she.


ELINDA'S GLOVE    Poem Text    
First Line: Thou snowy farm with thy five tenements!
Last Line: Are still allow'd to fiddle with the case.
Variant Title(s): The Glove
Subject(s): Fiddles; Gloves; Musical Instruments; Mittens; Muffs


FEMALE GLORY    Poem Text    
First Line: Mongst the world's wonders, there doth yet remain
Last Line: Mistress o' th' world and me, and laura is her name.
Subject(s): Women


GRATIANA DANCING AND SINGING    Poem Text    
First Line: See! With what constant motion
Last Line: The graces danced, and apollo played!'
Subject(s): Dancing & Dancers


HER MUFF    Poem Text    
First Line: Twas not for some calm blessing to receive
Last Line: But still contemplate must the hidden muff.
Subject(s): Gloves; Mittens; Muffs


IN ALLUSION TO THE FRENCH SONG 'N'ETENDEZ VOUS PAS CE LANGUAGE'    Poem Text    
First Line: How often have my tears
Last Line: This language wants both tongue and voice.


LA BELLA BONA ROBA    Poem Text    
First Line: I cannot tell who loves the skeleton
Last Line: Pass rascal deer, strike me the largest doe.
Subject(s): Prostitution; Harlots; Whores; Brothels


LOVE CONQUERED; A SONG    Poem Text    
First Line: The childish god of love did swear
Last Line: So on his sing'd wings up he steer'd.


LOVE ENTHRON'D    Poem Text    
First Line: In troth, I do myself persuade
Last Line: Her crowned self submits to her own laws.


LOVE MADE IN THE FIRST AGE    Poem Text    
First Line: In the nativity of time
Last Line: Enjoying of myself I lie.
Subject(s): Love


LUCASTA AT THE BATH    Poem Text    
First Line: I' th' autumn of a summer's day
Last Line: Wilt unto love, thy captive, bow.


LUCASTA LAUGHING    Poem Text    
First Line: Hark how she laughs aloud
Last Line: Is still the pleasant'st jest.
Subject(s): Laughter


LUCASTA PAYING HER OBSEQUIES TO THE CHASTE MEMORY OF BOWES BARNE    Poem Text    
First Line: See! What an undisturbed tear
Last Line: To dress my sorrow by.
Subject(s): Mourning; Bereavement


LUCASTA TAKING THE WATERS AT TUNBRIDGE    Poem Text    
First Line: Ye happy floods! That now must pass
Last Line: Of virtue, honour, love and bliss.
Subject(s): Health Resorts; Tunbridge Wells, England; Spas


LUCASTA WEEPING; SONG    Poem Text    
First Line: Lucasta wept, and still the bright
Last Line: Kindled again his fires.
Subject(s): Grief; Sorrow; Sadness


LUCASTA'S FAN, WITH A LOOKING-GLASS IN IT    Poem Text    
First Line: Estrich, thou feather'd fool and easy prey
Last Line: If hence she dress herself but in his eyes.
Subject(s): Vanity


LUCASTA'S WORLD    Poem Text    
First Line: Cold as the breath of winds that blow
Last Line: E're since hath in her sun-shine liv'd.


NIGHT; TO LUCASTA    Poem Text    
First Line: Night! Loathed jailor of the lock'd-up sun
Last Line: Now feels it all the day one rising morn.
Subject(s): Night; Bedtime


ODE    Poem Text    
First Line: You are deceiv'd: I sooner may, dull fair
Last Line: No poet's pencil must or can do so.


ON SANNAZAR'S BEING HONOURED WITH SIX HUNDRED DUCATS BY CLARISSIMI    Poem Text    
First Line: Twas a blithe prince exchang'd five hundred crowns
Last Line: All wrath and storms do end in calms and praise.
Subject(s): Poetry & Poets; Venice, Italy


ON THE BEST, LAST, AND ONLY REMAINING COMEDY OF MR. FLETCHER    Poem Text    
First Line: I'm un-o'erclouded too! Free from the mist!
Last Line: Shows this one carbuncle, that darkens all.
Subject(s): Fletcher, John (1579-1625); Plays & Playwrights ; Dramatists


ON THE DEATH OF MISTRESS ELIZABETH FILMER; AN ELEGIACAL EPITAPH    Poem Text    
First Line: You that shall live awhile before
Last Line: When all but very virtue's dead.
Subject(s): Epitaphs


ORPHEUS TO BEASTS; SONG    Poem Text    
First Line: Here, here, oh here, eurydice
Last Line: Than now you hear.
Subject(s): Animals; Mythology - Classical; Orpheus


ORPHEUS TO WOODS    Poem Text    
First Line: Hark! O hark! You guilty trees
Last Line: Aught but coffins and their tombs.
Subject(s): Mythology - Classical; Orpheus; Trees


PAINTURE; A PANEGYRIC TO THE BEST PICTURE OF FRIENDSHIP, PETER LELY    Poem Text    
First Line: If pliny, lord high treasurer of all
Last Line: But perish they and their effigies.
Subject(s): Friendship


PARIS'S SECOND JUDGMENT, UPON THE THREE DAUGHTERS OF ROBERT CAESAR    Poem Text    
First Line: Behold! Three sister-wonders, in whom met
Last Line: "what pity the whole world is but one ball!"
Subject(s): Sisters


PRINCESS LOUISA DRAWING    Poem Text    
First Line: I saw a little deity
Last Line: Beauties than they destroy'd before.


SIR THOMAS WORTLEY'S SONNET ANSWERED: THE ANSWER    Poem Text    
First Line: Again
Last Line: Her glorious, glorious name.


SONG    Poem Text    
First Line: I did believe I was in heav'n
Last Line: I burnt all o'er the letters of her name.


SONG    Poem Text    
First Line: In mine own monument I lie
Last Line: I'm loth to be alive again.


SONG    Poem Text    
First Line: Strive not, vain lover, to be fine
Last Line: Dotes on a gilded statue, and no more.


SONNET    Poem Text    
First Line: When I by thy fair shape did swear
Last Line: Than swearing to a saint that proves untrue.
Subject(s): Oaths


SONNET    Poem Text    
First Line: Depose your finger of that ring
Last Line: The blackest, when y' are ne'er the worse.
Subject(s): Oaths


SONNET. TO GENERAL GORING, AFTER THE PACIFICATION AT BERWICK    Poem Text    
First Line: Now the peace is made at the foe's rate
Last Line: To the couple! To the couple! Th' are divine.
Subject(s): Goring, George. Baron (1608-165)


THE ANT    Poem Text    
First Line: Forbear, thou great good husband, little ant
Last Line: Thinking to save all, we cast all away.
Subject(s): Ants; Insects; Bugs


THE APOSTACY OF ONE AND BUT ONE LADY    Poem Text    
First Line: That frantic error I adore
Last Line: But as the devil not half so true.
Subject(s): Love


THE DEDICATION. TO THE RIGHT HONOURABLE MY LADY ANNE LOVELACE    Poem Text    
First Line: To the richest treasury
Last Line: (with devotion) these toys.


THE DUEL    Poem Text    
First Line: Love, drunk the other day, knock'd at my breast
Last Line: Is to laugh at the boy, and he will cry.


THE EPILOGUE TO 'THE SCHOLARS'    Poem Text    
First Line: The stubborn author of the trifle crime
Last Line: He'll not look farther for a second day.


THE FAIR BEGGAR    Poem Text    
First Line: Commanding asker, if it be
Last Line: I starve your body you my mind.


THE FALCON    Poem Text    
First Line: Fair princess of the spacious air
Last Line: Only to sing thy elegy.
Subject(s): Falcons


THE GRASSHOPPER; TO MY NOBLE FRIEND MR. CHARLES COTTON    Poem Text    
First Line: Oh! Thou that swingst upon the waving ear [or, hair]
Last Line: That wants himself is poor indeed.
Subject(s): Cotton, Charles (1630-1687); Friendship; Grasshoppers


THE LADY ANNE LOVELACE, MY ASYLUM IN A GREAT EXTREMITY    Poem Text    
First Line: With that delight the royal captive's brought
Last Line: Possession of those things are none of mine.


THE MERIT OF INCONSTANCY    Poem Text    
First Line: Why dost thou say I am forsworn
Last Line: Did I still doat upon that face.
Subject(s): Unfaithfulness; Infidelity; Adultery; Inconstancy


THE ROSE    Poem Text    
First Line: Sweet, serene, sky-like flower
Last Line: Because her cheeks are near.
Variant Title(s): Ode To Lucasta. The Rose
Subject(s): Flowers; Roses


THE SCRUTINY; SONG    Poem Text    
First Line: Why should you swear I am forsworn
Last Line: Even sated with variety.
Subject(s): Love


THE SNAIL (1)    Poem Text    
First Line: Wise emblem of our politic [politick] world
Last Line: Upward, and rarefy the air.
Variant Title(s): The Snayl
Subject(s): Snails


THE SNAIL (2)    Poem Text    
First Line: The centaur, siren, I forgo
Last Line: He wanders with his country, too.
Subject(s): Snails


THE TOAD AND SPIDER; A DUEL    Poem Text    
First Line: Upon a day when the dog-star
Last Line: Of his fair aid a monument.
Subject(s): Insects; Spiders; Toads; Bugs


THE TRIUMPHS OF PHILAMORE AND AMORET; TO CHARLES COTTON    Poem Text    
First Line: Sir, your sad absence I complain, as earth
Last Line: Who have said naught, since I could say no more.


THE VINTAGE TO THE DUNGEON; A SONG    Poem Text    
First Line: Sing out, pent souls, sing cheerfully!
Last Line: And daunce to th' musick of your chaines.
Subject(s): Prisons & Prisoners; Convicts


TO A LADY THAT DESIRED ME I WOULD BEAR MY PART WITH HER IN A SONG    Poem Text    
First Line: This is the prettiest motion
Last Line: Not to be reach'd with human ears.


TO A LADY WITH A CHILD, THAT ASK'D AN OLD SHIRT    Poem Text    
First Line: And why an honour'd ragged shirt, that shows
Last Line: Pardon my boldness, madam: here's the clout.


TO ALTHEA, FROM PRISON    Poem Text    
First Line: When love with unconfined wings
Last Line: Enjoy such liberty.
Subject(s): Freedom; Love; Prisons & Prisoners; Liberty; Convicts


TO AMARANTHA, THAT SHE WOULD DISHEVEL HER HAIR    Poem Text    
First Line: Amarantha, sweet and fair
Last Line: That joys so ripe so little keep.
Variant Title(s): Her Golden Hair;song
Subject(s): Hair; Love


TO CHLOE, COURTING HER FOR HIS FRIEND    Poem Text    
First Line: Chloe, behold! Again I bow
Last Line: Fall to again by seeing others eat.
Subject(s): Courtship


TO DR. F.B. ON HIS BOOK OF CHESS    Poem Text    
First Line: Sir, now unravell'd is the golden fleece
Last Line: Bluster'd and clutter'd for, you play.
Subject(s): Chess


TO ELINDA, THAT LATELY I HAVE NOT WRITTEN    Poem Text    
First Line: If in me anger, or disdain
Last Line: But anch'rites pray in tears and sweat.


TO ELLINDA UPON HIS LATE RECOVERY; A PARADOX    Poem Text    
First Line: How I grieve that I am well!
Last Line: And for love compell'd to wander.


TO FLETCHER REVIV'D    Poem Text    
First Line: How have I been religious? What strange good
Last Line: Yet all men henceforth be afraid to write.
Subject(s): Fletcher, John (1579-1625); Poetry & Poets; Writing & Writers


TO HIS DEAR BROTHER COLONEL F.L. MOURNING DEATH AT CARMARTHEN    Poem Text    
First Line: If tears could wash the ill away
Last Line: Doth starry influence dissolve.
Subject(s): Brothers; Carmarthen, Wales; Mourning; Half-brothers; Bereavement


TO LUCASTA (1)    Poem Text    
First Line: Like to the sent'nel stars, I watch all night
Last Line: And in each mangled part my heart you 'll see.


TO LUCASTA (2)    Poem Text    
First Line: I laugh and sing, but cannot tell
Last Line: Turn all to saraband.


TO LUCASTA, FROM PRISON    Poem Text    
First Line: Long in thy shackles, liberty
Last Line: How to serve you, and you trust me!
Subject(s): Freedom; Liberty


TO LUCASTA, [ON] GOING BEYOND THE SEAS    Poem Text    
First Line: If to be absent were to be
Last Line: In heaven, -- their earthly bodies left behind.
Variant Title(s): Song
Subject(s): Absence; Immortality; Love; Sea; Separation; Isolation; Ocean


TO LUCASTA, [ON] GOING TO THE WARS    Poem Text    
First Line: Tell me not, sweet, I am unkind
Last Line: Loved I not honour more.
Variant Title(s): Going To The Wars;song
Subject(s): Absence; Desire; Duty; Heroism; Honor; Love; Soldiers; War; Separation; Isolation; Heroes; Heroines


TO LUCASTA: HER RESERVED LOOKS    Poem Text    
First Line: Lucasta, frown and let me die
Last Line: An angel here, the devil there.
Subject(s): Indifference


TO LUCASTA; ODE LYRIC    Poem Text    
First Line: Ah, lucasta, why so bright
Last Line: And 'tis both her corse and tomb.


TO MY DEAR FRIEND MR. ELDRED REVETT ON HIS POEMS MORAL AND DIVINE    Poem Text    
First Line: Cleft, as the top of the inspired hill
Last Line: Sick, echo o'er thy halleluiahs.
Subject(s): Poetry & Poets


TO MY LADY H.    Poem Text    
First Line: Tell me, ye subtle judges in love's treasury
Last Line: Finding she could not look, she strook him dead.


TO MY TRULY VALIANT, LEARNED FRIEND .. ART GLADIATORY INTO MATHEMATIC    Poem Text    
First Line: Hark, reader! Wilt be learn'd I' th' wars?
Last Line: And she writes with his sword.
Subject(s): War; Writing & Writers


TO MY WORTHY FRIEND MR. PETER LELY    Poem Text    
First Line: See! What a clouded majesty, and eyes
Last Line: None but my lely ever drew a mind.
Subject(s): Art & Artists; Charles I, King Of England (1600-1649); Lely, Sir Peter (1618-1680); Portraits


TO THE GENIUS OF MR. JOHN HALL, ON HIS EXACT TRANSLATION OF HIEROCLES    Poem Text    
First Line: Tis not from cheap thanks thinly to repay
Last Line: Thy soul is fled into hierocles.
Subject(s): Hall, John (1627-1656); Translating & Interpreting


TO THOMAS STANLEY, ON HIS LYRIC POEMS, COMPOSED BY JOHN GAMBLE    Poem Text    
First Line: What means this stately tablature
Last Line: Gamble hath wisely laid of ut re mi.
Subject(s): Stanley, Thomas (1625-1678)


UPON THE CURTAIN OF LUCASTA'S PICTURE IT WAS THUS WROUGHT    Poem Text    
First Line: Oh stay that covetous hand, first turn all eye
Last Line: Is but its shadow, as this its;---now draw.
Subject(s): Art & Artists; Paintings & Painters


VALIANT LOVE    Poem Text    
First Line: Now fie upon that everlasting life I die!
Last Line: Who to his prostrate e'er was prostrated.


VOITURE; PREFIXED TO JOHN DAVIES'S TRANSLATION OF VOITURE'S LETTERS    Poem Text    
First Line: Voiture! Whose gentle paper's so refin'd
Last Line: And what you speak not tastes on't, but is it.
Subject(s): Voiture, Vincent De (1598-1648)