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Author: jonson, ben
Matches Found: 329


Jonson, Ben    Poet's Biography
329 poems available by this author


(A POEM SENT ME BY SIR WILLIAM BURLASE)    Poem Text    
First Line: To paint thy worth, if rightly I did know it
Last Line: To all posterity; I will write burlase.


A CELEBRATION OF CHARIS: 1. HIS EXCUSE FOR LOVING    Poem Text    
First Line: Let it not your wonder move
Last Line: All the world for love may die.
Subject(s): Love


A CELEBRATION OF CHARIS: 10. ANOTHER LADY'S EXCEPTION    Poem Text    
First Line: For his mind, I do not care
Last Line: Tis one good part I'd lie withal.


A CELEBRATION OF CHARIS: 2. HOW HE SAW HER    Poem Text    
First Line: I beheld her on a day / when her look out-flourished may
Last Line: In a hercules-his shape.


A CELEBRATION OF CHARIS: 3. WHAT HE SUFFERED    Poem Text    
First Line: After many scorns like these
Last Line: Hear and make example too.


A CELEBRATION OF CHARIS: 4. HER TRIUMPH    Poem Text    
First Line: See the chariot at hand here of love
Last Line: Oh, so white! Oh, so soft! Oh, so sweet is she.
Variant Title(s): The Triumph Of Charis;love's Chariot, Fr. The Devil Is An Ass
Subject(s): Admiration


A CELEBRATION OF CHARIS: 5. HIS DISCOURSE WITH CUPID    Poem Text    
First Line: Noblest charis, you that are
Last Line: And minerva, when she talkes.
Subject(s): Cupid; Eros


A CELEBRATION OF CHARIS: 6. CLAIMING A SECOND KISS BY DESERT    Poem Text    
First Line: Charis, guess, and do not miss
Last Line: May not claim another kiss.
Subject(s): Kisses


A CELEBRATION OF CHARIS: 8. URGING HER OF A PROMISE    Poem Text    
First Line: Charis one day in discourse
Last Line: (and that quickly) speak your man.


A CELEBRATION OF CHARIS: 9. HER MAN DESCRIBED ... DICTAMEN    Poem Text    
First Line: Of your trouble, ben, to ease me
Last Line: I can rest me where I am.
Variant Title(s): A Proper Man


A FIT OF RHYME AGAINST RHYME [OR, RIME]    Poem Text    
First Line: Rhyme, the rack of finest wits
Last Line: Was the founder!
Subject(s): Poetry & Poets; Rhyme


A HYMN TO GOD THE FATHER    Poem Text    
First Line: Hear me, o god!
Last Line: Under his cross.
Variant Title(s): Underwoods: Hymn


A LITTLE SHRUB GROWING BY    Poem Text    
First Line: Ask not to know this man. If fame should speak
Last Line: And so I leave to stir him, lest he stink.
Subject(s): Hate


A NEW YEAR'S GIFT SUNG TO KING CHARLES    Poem Text    
First Line: Today old janus opens the new year
Last Line: Tis he, 'tis he, etc.
Subject(s): Holidays; New Year


A NYMPH'S PASSION    Poem Text    
First Line: I love, and he loves me again
Last Line: If love, or fear, would let me tell his name.
Subject(s): Country Life


A PANEGYRE, ON HAPPY ENTRANCE OF JAMES, OUR SOVEREIGN TO PARLIAMENT    Poem Text    
First Line: Heaven now not strives, alone, our breasts to fill
Last Line: Still to have such a king, and this king long.'
Subject(s): James I, King Of England (1566-1625)


A PINDARIC ODE    Poem Text    
First Line: Brave infant of saguntum clear
Last Line: Had sowed these fruits, and got the harvest in.
Variant Title(s): To The Immortal Memory ... Noble Pair, Sir Lucius Cary And Sir Henry Morrison;the Ode On Cary And Morison
Subject(s): Cary, Lucius. 2d Viscount Falkland; Courage; Death; Life; Morison, Sir Henry (1608-1629); Valor; Bravery; Dead, The


A SATIRICAL SHRUB    Poem Text    
First Line: A woman's friendship! God whom I trust in
Last Line: The devil; and be the damning of us all.


A SONG    Poem Text    
First Line: Come, let us here enjoy the shade
Last Line: The eldest god, yet still a child.


A SONG OF THE MOON    Poem Text    
First Line: To the wonders of the peak
Last Line: She will not seize it.
Subject(s): Moon


A SONG OF WELCOME TO KING CHARLES    Poem Text    
First Line: Fresh as the day, and new as are the hours
Last Line: And you, with them, as father of our spring.


A SONNET, TO THE NOBLE LADY, THE LADY MARY WROTH    Poem Text    
First Line: I that have been a lover, and could show it
Last Line: For venus' ceston, every line you make.
Variant Title(s): A Sonnet To The Noble Lady, The Lady Mary Wroth
Subject(s): Love


A SPEECH ACCORDING TO HORACE    Poem Text    
First Line: Why yet, my noble hearts, they cannot say
Last Line: Her broken arms up, to their empty moulds.


A SPEECH OUT OF LUCAN    Poem Text    
First Line: Just and fit actions, ptolemey (he saith)
Last Line: Shall never dare do anything but fear.


A SPEECH PRESENTED UNTO KING JAMES AT A TILTING    Poem Text    
First Line: Two noble knights, whom true desire and zeal
Last Line: If from a little spark he rise not fire.
Subject(s): Rich, Henry. 1st Earl Of Holland; Rich, Robert, 2d Earl Of Warwick


AN ELEGY (1)    Poem Text    
First Line: Though beauty be the mark of praise
Last Line: What I in her am grieved to want!
Subject(s): Virtue


AN ELEGY (2)    Poem Text    
First Line: Let me be what I am, as virgil cold
Last Line: More then of eithers manners, wit, or face!
Subject(s): Poetry & Poets


AN ELEGY (3)    Poem Text    
First Line: That love's a bitter sweet, I ne'er conceive
Last Line: If I had writ no word, but 'dear', farewell.


AN ELEGY (4)    Poem Text    
First Line: Since you must go, and I must bid farewell
Last Line: Till I may see both it and you again.
Subject(s): Love - Loss Of


AN ELEGY (5)    Poem Text    
First Line: Can beauty that did prompt me first to write
Last Line: Love to my heart, and fortune to my lines.


AN ELEGY (6)    Poem Text    
First Line: By those bright eyes, at whose immortal fires
Last Line: Is constant to be extraordinary.


AN ELEGY (7)    Poem Text    
First Line: Tis true, I'm broke! Vows, oaths, and all I had
Last Line: Rather than want your light, I wish a grave.


AN ELEGY ON THE LADY JANE PAWLET, MARCHIONESS OF WINTON    Poem Text    
First Line: What gentle ghost, besprent with april dew
Last Line: And, sure of heaven, rides triumphing in.
Subject(s): Death; Pawlett, Lady Jane (D. 1631); Dead, The


AN EPIGRAM    Poem Text    
First Line: That you have seen the pride, beheld the sport
Last Line: He is the man, and favourite of god.


AN EPIGRAM ON SIR EDWARD COKE WHEN HE WAS LORD CHIEF JUSTICE    Poem Text    
First Line: He that should search all glories of the gown
Last Line: Needs lend an aid, to thine she had her eyes.


AN EPIGRAM ON THE COURT PUCELL    Poem Text    
First Line: Does the court pucell then so censure me
Last Line: Will call it a bastard, when a prophet's born.


AN EPIGRAM ON THE PRINCE'S BIRTH    Poem Text    
First Line: And art thou born, brave babe? Blessed be thy birth!
Last Line: Festinat caesar qui placuisse tibi.
Subject(s): Charles Ii, King Of England (1630-1685)


AN EPIGRAM ON WILLIAM, LORD BURLEIGH, LORD HIGH TREASURER    Poem Text    
First Line: If thou wouldst know the virtues of mankind
Last Line: Of divine blessing, would not serve a state?


AN EPIGRAM TO KING CHARLES    Poem Text    
First Line: Great charles, among the holy gifts of grace
Last Line: But, that he cure the people's evil too?
Variant Title(s): An Epigram. To King Charles For A Hundred Pounds He Sent Me
Subject(s): Charles I, King Of England (1600-1649); Piety


AN EPIGRAM TO MY JOVIAL GOOD FRIEND MR ROBERT DOVER    Poem Text    
First Line: I cannot bring my muse to drop her vies
Last Line: Of subjects; let such envy, till they burst.
Subject(s): Dover, Robert (1575-1652); Hunting; Hunters


AN EPIGRAM TO MY MUSE, THE LADY DIGBY, ON HER HUSBAND    Poem Text    
First Line: Though, happy muse, thou know my digby well
Last Line: Being sent to one, they will be read of all.
Subject(s): Digby, Lady Venetia; Digby, Sir Kenelm (1603-1665)


AN EPIGRAM TO THE COUNCILLOR THAT PLEADED AND CARRIED THE CAUSE    Poem Text    
First Line: That I, hereafter, do not think the bar
Last Line: Alone, but all thy rank a reverend name.


AN EPIGRAM TO THE QUEEN, THEN LYING IN    Poem Text    
First Line: Hail mary, full of grace, it once was said
Last Line: Of so much safety to the realm, and king.
Subject(s): Henrietta Maria, Queen Of England; Pregnancy


AN EPIGRAM. TO OUR GREAT AND GOOD KING CHARLES ON HIS ANNIVERSARY DAY    Poem Text    
First Line: How happy were the subject if he knew
Last Line: How much to heaven for thee, great charles, they owe!
Subject(s): Charles I, King Of England (1600-1649)


AN EPIGRAM. TO THE HONOURED --, COUNTESS OF --    Poem Text    
First Line: The wisdom, madam, of your private life
Last Line: It will be shame for them, if they have none.


AN EPIGRAM. TO THE HOUSEHOLD    Poem Text    
First Line: What can the cause be, when the king hath given
Last Line: The king's fame lives. Go now, deny his tierce.
Subject(s): Charles I, King Of England (1600-1649)


AN EPIGRAM. TO THE SMALL-POX    Poem Text    
First Line: Envious and foul disease, could there not be
Last Line: And scorned, thou hast shown thy malice, but hast failed.


AN EPIGRAM. TO THOMAS LORD ELLESMERE, LAST TERM HE SAT CHANCELLOR    Poem Text    
First Line: So justest lord, may all your judgements be
Last Line: You favour truth, and me, in this man's cause.


AN EPIGRAM. TO WILLIAM, EARL OF NEWCASTLE (1)    Poem Text    
First Line: They talk of fencing, and the use of arms
Last Line: And valiant were, with, or without their hands.


AN EPIGRAM. TO WILLIAM, EARL OF NEWCASTLE (2)    Poem Text    
First Line: When first, my lord, I saw you back your horse
Last Line: At these immortal mangers virgil fed.


AN EPISTLE TO A FRIEND (1)    Poem Text    
First Line: Censure not sharply then, but me advise
Last Line: Her fury, though no friendship he betray.


AN EPISTLE TO A FRIEND (2)    Poem Text    
First Line: Sir, I am thankful, first, to heaven, for you
Last Line: Her fury, yet no friendship to betray.


AN EPISTLE TO A FRIEND, TO PERSUADE HIM TO THE WARS    Poem Text    
First Line: Wake, friend, from forth thy lethargy: the drum
Last Line: Who falls for love of god, shall rise a star.
Subject(s): War


AN EPISTLE TO MASTER ARTHUR SQUIB    Poem Text    
First Line: What I am not, and what I fain would be
Last Line: It is a richer purchase than of land.


AN EPISTLE TO MASTER JOHN SELDEN    Poem Text    
First Line: I know to whom I write. Here, I am sure
Last Line: You both are modest. So am I. Farewell.
Subject(s): Selden, John (1584-1654)


AN EPISTLE TO SIR EDWARD SACKVILLE, NOW EARL OF DORSET    Poem Text    
First Line: If sackville, all that have the power to do
Last Line: Find you to reckon nothing, me owe all.
Subject(s): Sackville, Edward. 4th Earl Of Dorset


AN EPITAPH    Poem Text    
First Line: What beauty would have lovely styled
Last Line: To fetch the flesh, we keep the roll.


AN EPITAPH ON MASTER VINCENT CORBET    Poem Text    
First Line: I have my piety too, which could
Last Line: Who makes the one, so it be first, makes both.
Subject(s): Epitaphs


AN EPITAPH, ON HENRY LORD LAWARE. TO THE PASSERBY    Poem Text    
First Line: If, passenger, thou canst but read
Last Line: Because it durst have noblier died.


AN EXECRATION UPON VULCAN    Poem Text    
First Line: And why to me this, thou lame lord of fire
Last Line: Thy wife's pox on thee, and bess braughton's too.
Subject(s): Fire


AN EXPOSTULATION WITH INIGO JONES    Poem Text    
First Line: Master surveyor, you that first began
Last Line: With all remonstrance make an honest man.
Subject(s): Jones, Inigo (1573-1652)


AN ODE    Poem Text    
First Line: Helen, did homer never see
Last Line: So much my subject drowns the rest.
Subject(s): Beauty


AN ODE TO HIMSELF    Poem Text    
First Line: Where dost thou careless lie
Last Line: Safe from the wolf's black jaw, and the dull ass's hoof.
Subject(s): Freedom; Love; Liberty


AN ODE TO JAMES, EARL OF DESMOND    Poem Text    
First Line: Where art thou, genius? I should use
Last Line: As far from all revolt, as you are now from fortune.


AND MUST I SING? WHAT SUBJECT SHALL I CHOOSE?       


ANOTHER TO THOMAS LORD ELLESMERE    Poem Text    
First Line: The judge his favour timely then extends
Last Line: He does you wrong, that craves you to do right.


ANOTHER. IN DEFENCE OF THEIR INCONSTANCY. A SONG    Poem Text    
First Line: Hang up those dull, and envious fools
Last Line: To love one man, he'd leave her first.
Subject(s): Unfaithfulness; Infidelity; Adultery; Inconstancy


ANSWER TO MASTER WITHER'S SONG, 'SHALL I, WASTING IN DESPAIR?'    Poem Text    
First Line: Shall I mine affections slack
Last Line: What care I, what others be?
Subject(s): Love - Complaints; Wither, George (1588-1667)


AUTHOR AD LIBRUM    Poem Text    
First Line: Go little book, go little fable
Last Line: Of her white hand; or she can spare it.
Variant Title(s): To Lucy, Countess Of Bedford, In A ... Cynthia's Revels
Subject(s): Bedford, Lucy, Countess Of (1581-1627); Russell, Lucy, Countess Of Bedford


BARTHOLOMEW FAIR: EPILOGUE    Poem Text    
First Line: Your majesty hath seen the play
Last Line: If it so happy be, t' have pleased the king.


BARTHOLOMEW FAIR: NIGHTINGALE'S SONG    Poem Text    
First Line: My masters and friends, and good people draw near
Last Line: Than live to be hanged for cutting a purse.


BARTHOLOMEW FAIR: PROLOGUE TO THE KING'S MAJESTY    Poem Text    
First Line: Your majesty is welcome to a fair
Last Line: To give you for a fairing true delight.
Subject(s): Festivals; Fairs; Pageants


BEN JONSON'S GRACE BEFORE KING JAMES    Poem Text    
First Line: Our royal king and queen, god bless
Last Line: And god bless me, and god bless rafe.
Subject(s): James I, King Of England (1566-1625)


CHARLES CAVENDISH TO HIS POSTERITY    Poem Text    
First Line: Sons, seek not me among these polished stones
Last Line: Not when I died, but how I lived. Farewell.


CHLORIDIA: SONG OF ZEPHYRUS AND SPRING    Poem Text    
First Line: Come forth, come forth, the gentle spring
Last Line: Of quickening anything.


CHRISTMAS HIS MASQUE, SELECTION    Poem Text    
First Line: Nor do you think that their legs is all
Last Line: And his couple of daughters dear.


CUPID    Poem Text    
First Line: Beauties, have ye seen this toy
Last Line: And that he's venus' runaway.
Variant Title(s): Venus' Runaway
Subject(s): Cupid; Eros


CYNTHIA'S REVELS, SELECTION    Poem Text    
Variant Title(s): Echo's Dirge For Narcissus
Subject(s): Nature


EPICOENE; OR, THE SILENT WOMAN: FREEDOM IN DRESS    Poem Text    
First Line: Still to be neat, still to be drest
Last Line: They strike mine eyes, but not my heart.
Variant Title(s): Clerimont's Song;sweet Neglect;simplex Munditiis
Subject(s): Art & Artists; Clothing & Dress; Cosmetics; Simplicity


EPICOENE; OR, THE SILENT WOMAN: SONG    Poem Text    
First Line: Modest, and fair, for fair and good are near
Last Line: I know to speak, and she to hold her peace.


EPIGRAM ON COURT-WORM    Poem Text    
First Line: All men are worms, but this no man. In silk
Last Line: Which was a caterpillar. So 'twill die.
Variant Title(s): On Court-worm


EPIGRAM TO MY BOOKSELLER    Poem Text    
First Line: Thou, friend, wilt hear all censures; unto thee
Last Line: Their perfumed judgements, let them kiss thy wife.


EPIGRAM. TO A FRIEND AND SON    Poem Text    
First Line: Son, and my friend, I had not called you so
Last Line: Rather to boast rich hangings, than rare friends.


EPIGRAM: 118. ON GUT    Poem Text    
First Line: Gut eats all day and lechers all the night
Last Line: Lust it comes out, that gluttony went in.
Subject(s): Gluttony


EPIGRAM: 14. TO WILLIAM CAMDEN    Poem Text    
First Line: Camden, most reverend head, to whom I owe
Last Line: But for their powers, accept my piety.
Subject(s): Camden, William (1551-1623); Schools; Students


EPIGRAM: 45. ON MY FIRST SON    Poem Text    
First Line: Farewell, thou child of my right hand, and joy
Last Line: As what he loves may never like too much.
Variant Title(s): On His First Sonne;on My First Sonne;epitaph: On My Son
Subject(s): Death - Children; Fathers; Grief; Men; Mourning; Parents; Prayer; Sons; Death - Babies; Sorrow; Sadness; Bereavement; Parenthood


EPIGRAM: 59. ON SPIES    Poem Text    
First Line: Spies, you are lights in state, but of base stuff
Last Line: Stink and are thrown away. End fair enough.
Subject(s): Spies


EPIGRAM: OF DEATH    Poem Text    
First Line: He that fears death, or mourns it in the just
Last Line: Shows of the resurrection little trust.
Variant Title(s): Of Death
Subject(s): Death; Dead, The


EPIGRAM: ON BANK THE USURER    Poem Text    
First Line: Bank feels no lameness of his knotty gout
Last Line: He toils to be at hell, as soon as they.
Subject(s): Usury


EPIGRAM: ON BAWDS AND USERERS    Poem Text    
First Line: If, as their ends, their fruits were so the same
Last Line: Bawdry, and usury were one kind of game.
Variant Title(s): On Bawds And Usurers
Subject(s): Usury


EPIGRAM: ON CAPTAIN HAZARD THE CHEATER    Poem Text    
First Line: Touched with the sin of false play in his punk
Last Line: Since when he's sober again, and all play's made.


EPIGRAM: ON CASHIERED CAPTAIN SURLY    Poem Text    
First Line: Surly's old whore in her new silks doth swim
Last Line: He cast, yet keeps her well! No, she keeps him.


EPIGRAM: ON CHEVERIL    Poem Text    
First Line: Cheveril cries out, my verses libels are
Last Line: That quitt'st the cause so oft, and rail'st at men?
Variant Title(s): On Cheveril


EPIGRAM: ON CHUFF, BANK'S THE USURER'S KINSMAN    Poem Text    
First Line: Chuff, lately rich in name, in chattels, goods
Last Line: When he made him executor, might be heir.
Variant Title(s): On Chuff, Banks The Usurer's Kinsman


EPIGRAM: ON COURT - PARROT    Poem Text    
First Line: To pluck down mine, poll sets up new wits still
Last Line: Still, 'tis his luck to praise me 'gainst his will.
Subject(s): Parrot, Henry


EPIGRAM: ON GYPSY    Poem Text    
First Line: Gypsy, new bawd, is turned physician
Last Line: For what she gave, a whore; a bawd, she cures.
Variant Title(s): On Gypsy


EPIGRAM: ON LIPPE, THE TEACHER    Poem Text    
First Line: I cannot think there's that antipathy
Last Line: T'inveigh 'gainst players: what did he then but play?


EPIGRAM: ON MILL, MY LADY'S WOMAN    Poem Text    
First Line: When mill first came to court, the unprofiting fool
Last Line: First bearing him a calf, bear him a bull.
Subject(s): Athletes


EPIGRAM: ON MONGREL ESQUIRE    Poem Text    
First Line: His bought arms mong not liked; for his first day
Last Line: And hath no honour lost, our duellists say.
Variant Title(s): On Mongrel Esquire


EPIGRAM: ON OLD COLT    Poem Text    
First Line: For all night-sins with others' wives, unknown
Last Line: Colt, now, doth daily penance in his own.
Variant Title(s): On Old Colt


EPIGRAM: ON POET-APE    Poem Text    
First Line: Poor poet-ape, that would be thought our chief
Last Line: From locks of wool, or shreds from the whole piece!
Variant Title(s): On Poet-ape
Subject(s): Poetry & Poets


EPIGRAM: ON SIR JOHN ROE (1)    Poem Text    
First Line: In place of scutcheons that should deck thy hearse
Last Line: We, sad for him, may glory, and not sin.
Variant Title(s): On Sir John Roe
Subject(s): Roe, Sir John (1581-1606)


EPIGRAM: ON SIR JOHN ROE (2)    Poem Text    
First Line: What two brave perils of the private sword
Last Line: Seas, serenes, swords, shot, sickness, all are there.
Variant Title(s): On Sir John Roe
Subject(s): Roe, Sir John (1581-1606)


EPIGRAM: ON SIR JOHN ROE (3)    Poem Text    
First Line: I'll not offend thee with a vain tear more
Last Line: Who wets my grave, can be no friend of mine.
Variant Title(s): To The Same
Subject(s): Roe, Sir John (1581-1606)


EPIGRAM: ON SIR VOLUPTUOUS BEAST    Poem Text    
First Line: While beast instructs his fair and innocent wife
Last Line: Just wife, and, to change me, make woman's haste.


EPIGRAM: ON THE SAME (VOLUPTUOUS) BEAST    Poem Text    
First Line: Than his chaste wife though beast now know no more
Last Line: He adulters still: his thoughts lie with a whore.
Variant Title(s): On The Same Beast


EPIGRAM: TO A FRIEND    Poem Text    
First Line: To put out the word 'whore' thou dost me woo
Last Line: Throughout my book. 'troth put out woman too.


EPIGRAM: TO CENSORIOUS COURTLING    Poem Text    
First Line: Courtling, I rather thou shouldst utterly
Last Line: Would both thy folly, and thy spite betray.
Variant Title(s): To Censorious Courtling


EPIGRAM: TO COURTLING    Poem Text    
First Line: I grieve not, courtling, thou art started up
Last Line: Thy person only, courtling, is the vice.


EPIGRAM: TO FOOL, OR KNAVE    Poem Text    
First Line: Thy praise or dispraise is to me alike
Last Line: One doth not stroke me, nor the other strike.
Subject(s): Indifference


EPIGRAM: TO GROOM IDIOT    Poem Text    
First Line: Idiot, last night I prayed thee but forbear
Last Line: And, hood-winked, for a man, embrace a post.


EPIGRAM: TO HORNET    Poem Text    
First Line: Hornet, thou hast thy wife dressed for the stall
Last Line: To draw thee custom: but herself gets all.
Subject(s): Cuckolds


EPIGRAM: TO KNG JAMES    Poem Text    
First Line: Who would not be thy subject, james, to obey
Last Line: And since, the whole land was preserved for thee.
Variant Title(s): To King James
Subject(s): James I, King Of England (1566-1625)


EPIGRAM: TO MY MUSE    Poem Text    
First Line: Away, and leave me, thou thing most abhorred
Last Line: For worth he has not, he is taxed, not praised.


EPIGRAM: TO OLD-END GATHERER    Poem Text    
First Line: Long-gathering old end, I did fear thee wise
Last Line: Could save that line to dedicate to thee?
Variant Title(s): To Old-end Gatherer
Subject(s): Plagiarism


EPIGRAM: TO ONE THAT DESIRED ME NOT TO NAME HIM    Poem Text    
First Line: Be safe, nor fear thyself so good a fame
Last Line: I'm more ashamed to have thee thought my foe.


EPIGRAM: TO PERSON GUILTY    Poem Text    
First Line: Guilty, because I bad you late be wise
Last Line: I'll lose my modesty, and tell your name.
Variant Title(s): To Person Guilty


EPIGRAM: TO PERSON GUILTY    Poem Text    
First Line: Guilty, be wise; and though thou know'st the crimes
Last Line: And person to the world; ere I thy name.
Variant Title(s): To Person Guilty


EPIGRAM: TO PERTINAX COB    Poem Text    
First Line: Cob, thou nor soldier, thief, nor fencer art
Last Line: Yet by thy weapon liv'st! Th' hast one good part.


EPIGRAM: TO PLAYWRIGHT    Poem Text    
First Line: Playwright me reads, and still my verses damns
Last Line: In my chaste book: profess them in thine own.
Variant Title(s): To Playwright


EPIGRAM: TO PROWL THE PLAGIARY    Poem Text    
First Line: Forbear to tempt me, prowl, I will not show
Last Line: I must a libel make, and cozen both.
Subject(s): Plagiarism


EPIGRAM: TO ROBERT, EARL OF SALISBURY (1)    Poem Text    
First Line: What need hast thou of me, or of my muse
Last Line: As thou stand'st clear of the necessity.
Variant Title(s): To Robert, Earl Of Salisbury
Subject(s): Cecil, Robert (1563-1612); Salisbury, 1st Earl Of; Cranborne, 1st Viscount


EPIGRAM: TO ROBERT, EARL OF SALISBURY (2)    Poem Text    
First Line: Who can consider thy right courses run
Last Line: To so true worth, though thou thyself forbid.
Subject(s): Cecil, Robert (1563-1612); Salisbury, 1st Earl Of; Cranborne, 1st Viscount


EPIGRAM: TO ROBERT, EARL OF SALISBURY, UPON ACESSION TO TREASURESHIP    Poem Text    
First Line: Not glad, like those that have new hopes or suits
Last Line: I have sung the greater fortunes of our state.
Variant Title(s): To The Same
Subject(s): Cecil, Robert (1563-1612); Salisbury, 1st Earl Of; Cranborne, 1st Viscount


EPIGRAM: TO SIR ANNUAL TILTER (SAMUEL FULLER)    Poem Text    
First Line: Tilter, the most may admire thee, though not I
Last Line: But that's put in, thou'lt say. Why, so is thine.
Variant Title(s): To Sir Annual Tilter


EPIGRAM: TO SIR COD    Poem Text    
First Line: Leave, cod, tobacco-like, burnt gums to take
Last Line: Arsenic would thee fit for society make.


EPIGRAM: TO SIR LUCKLESS WOO-ALL    Poem Text    
First Line: Is this the sir, who, some waste wife to win
Last Line: Yes, now he wears his knighthood every day.
Variant Title(s): To Sir Luckless Woo-all


EPIGRAM: TO SIR SIR HENRY GOODYERE    Poem Text    
First Line: Goodyere, I am glad and grateful to report
Last Line: What would his serious actions me have learned?
Subject(s): Goodyer, Sir Henry (1571-1627); Goodyere, Sir Henry (1571-1627)


EPIGRAM: TO THE PARLIAMENT    Poem Text    
First Line: There's reason good that you good laws should make
Last Line: Men's manners ne'er were viler, for your sake.
Variant Title(s): To The Parliament


EPIGRAM: TO THE SAME (SIR LUCKLESS WOO-ALL)    Poem Text    
First Line: Sir luckless, troth, for luck's sake pass by one
Last Line: He that woos every widow, will get none.
Variant Title(s): To The Same


EPIGRAM: TO THOMAS, EARL OF SUFFOLK    Poem Text    
First Line: Since men have left to do praiseworthy things
Last Line: Proves, that is god's, which was the people's voice.
Subject(s): Howard, Thomas. Earl Of Suffolk; Howard, Thomas (1585-1646)


EPIGRAM: TO THOMAS, LORD CHNACELLOR (EGERTON)    Poem Text    
First Line: Whilst thy weighed judgments, egerton, I hear
Last Line: T'our times returned, hath made her heaven in thee.
Subject(s): Egerton, Thomas. Baron Ellesmere


EPIGRAM: TO WILLIAM ROE    Poem Text    
First Line: When nature bids us leave to live, 'tis late
Last Line: Though life be short, let us not make it so.
Subject(s): Roe, William (B. 1585)


EPIGRAM: TO WILLIAM, LORD MONTEAGLE    Poem Text    
First Line: Lo, what my country should have done (have raised
Last Line: But saver of my country thee alone.
Subject(s): Gunpowder Plot; Parker, William. 4th Baron Monteagle; Guy Fawkes


EPISTLE ANSWERING TO ONE THAT ASKED TO BE SEALED OF THE TRIBE OF BEN    Poem Text    
First Line: Men that are safe, and sure, in all they do
Last Line: Sir, you are sealed of the tribe of ben.
Variant Title(s): An Epistle Answering To One That Asked To Be Sealed Of Ben


EPISTLE TO A FRIEND    Poem Text    
First Line: They are not, sir, worst owers, that do pay
Last Line: And I will bring a crop, if not the best.


EPISTLE TO ELIZABETH, COUNTESS RUTLAND    Poem Text    
First Line: Madam, / whilst that for which all virtue now is sold
Last Line: My best of wishes, may you bear a son.
Subject(s): Holidays; New Year; Sidney, Elizabeth. Countess Of Rutland


EPISTLE TO KATHERINE, LADY AUBIGNY    Poem Text    
First Line: Tis grown almost a danger to speak true
Last Line: Because nor it can change, nor such a mind.


EPISTLE TO MR ARTHUR SQUIB    Poem Text    
First Line: I am to dine, friend, where I must be weighed
Last Line: For your security. I can no better.


EPISTLE. TO MY LADY COVELL    Poem Text    
First Line: You won not verses, madam, you won me
Last Line: And should grow rich, had I much more to pay.


EPITAPH ON ELIZABETH, L.H.    Poem Text    
First Line: Wouldst thou hear what man can say
Last Line: Than that it lived at all. Farewell.
Subject(s): Coke, Sir Edward (1552-1634); Death; Hatton, Lady Elizabeth (Mrs Edward Coke); Dead, The


EPITAPH ON KATHERINE, LADY OGLE    Poem Text    
First Line: Tis a record in heaven. You, that were
Last Line: And this a copy is of the record.
Subject(s): Epitaphs


EPITAPH ON MASTER PHILIP GRAY    Poem Text    
First Line: Reader, stay / and if I had no more to say
Last Line: What surety of life have thou, and I?


EPITAPH ON S.P., A CHILD OF QUEEN ELIZABETH'S CHAPEL    Poem Text    
First Line: Weep with me, all you that read
Last Line: Heaven vows to keep him.
Variant Title(s): Epitaph For Salomon Pavey, Child Actor In Queen's Revels Co.;epitaph On Salathiel Pavy, A Child Of Queen Elizabeth's Chapel;epitaph: On Solomon Pavy, Child Of Queen Elizabeth's Chapel
Subject(s): Actors & Actresses; Death - Children; London; Actresses; Death - Babies


EPITHALAMION: OR, A SONG CELEBRATING NUPTIALS OF HIEROME WESTON    Poem Text    
First Line: Though thou hast passed thy summer standing, stay
Last Line: The longing couple, all that elder lovers know.
Subject(s): Wedding Song; Epithalamium


EPODE    Poem Text    
First Line: Not to know vice at all, and keep true state
Last Line: Man may securely sinne, but safely never.
Variant Title(s): The Forrest: 11. Epode
Subject(s): Desire; Virtue


EUPHEME, OR THE FAIR FAME OF LADY VENETIA DIGBY    Poem Text    
First Line: Fair fame, who art ordained to crown
Last Line: The tenth, being her inscription, or crown, is lost
Subject(s): Digby, Lady Venetia


FOR LOVE'S SAKE, KISS ME ONCE AGAIN!    Poem Text    
Last Line: Let who will think us dead, or wish our death.
Variant Title(s): He Teaches Her To Kiss;of Kissing
Subject(s): Innocence; Kisses; Love


HERE FOLLOW CERTAIN OTHER VERSES, AS CHARMS, TO UNLOCK .. CRUDITIES    Poem Text    
First Line: Here, like arion, our coriat doth draw
Last Line: Being in fear to be robbed, he most learnedly begs.


IN AUTHOREM    Poem Text    
First Line: Thou, that wouldst find the habit of true passion
Last Line: His proof their praise will meet, as in this line.


IN THE PERSON OF WOMANKIND (IN DEFENSE OF THEIR INCONSTANCY)    Poem Text    
First Line: Men, if you love us, play no more
Last Line: To make a new, and hang that by.
Subject(s): Women


JEALOUSY    Poem Text    
First Line: Wretched and foolish jealousy
Last Line: I ne'er will owe my health to a disease.
Variant Title(s): Against Jealousy


LIFE AND DEATH    Poem Text    
First Line: The ports of death are sins; of life, good deeds
Last Line: For good men but see death, the wicked taste it.
Variant Title(s): Of Life And Death
Subject(s): Death; Dead, The


LORD BACON'S BIRTHDAY    Poem Text    
First Line: Hail, happy genius of this ancient pile
Last Line: In raising him the wisdom of my king.


LOVE'S TRIUMPH THROUGH CALLIPOLIS: EUCLIA'S HYMN    Poem Text    
First Line: So love, emergent out of chaos, brought
Last Line: By virtue of divine intelligence!


MERCURY VINDICATED: NATURE    Poem Text    
First Line: How young and fresh am I tonight
Last Line: For nature bids the best, and never bade in vain.


MERCURY VINICATED, SELECTION    Poem Text    
First Line: Soft, subtle fire, thou soul of art
Last Line: As if by art alone it could be righted.


MY PICTURE LEFT IN SCOTLAND    Poem Text    
First Line: I now think, love is rather deaf than blind
Last Line: And all these through her eyes, have stopped her ears.
Variant Title(s): The Poet-wooer;middle-age Overtakes Him
Subject(s): Love


NEPTUNE'S TRIUMPH FOR THE RETURN OF ALBION, SELECTION    Poem Text    
First Line: Come, noble nymphs, and do not hide
Last Line: Do promise you will do it.


NEW YEARS, EXPECT NEW GIFTS: SISTER, YOUR HARP       


O, DO NOT WANTON WITH THOSE EYES    Poem Text    


O, DO NOT WANTON WITH THOSE EYES       


ODE    Poem Text    
First Line: If men and times were now
Last Line: Who worthy win, who not, to be wise pallas' guests.


ODE ALLEGORIC    Poem Text    
First Line: Who saith our times nor have, nor can
Last Line: Set out a like, or second to our swan.


ODE ENTHUSIASTIC    Poem Text    
First Line: Splendour! O more than mortal
Last Line: Nor takes she pride to know them.


ODE TO HIMSELF    Poem Text    
First Line: Come, leave the loathed stage
Last Line: And see his chariot triumph 'bove his wain.
Variant Title(s): On The New Inn. Ode. To Himself
Subject(s): Jonson, Ben (1572-1637); Pericles (490-429 B.c.); Poetry & Poets; Theater & Theaters; Stage Life


ODE TO SIR WILLIAM SIDNEY, ON HIS BIRTHDAY    Poem Text    
First Line: Now that the hearth is crowned with smiling fire
Last Line: The birthday shines, when logs not burn, but men.
Subject(s): Birthdays; Sidney, Sir William (1590-1612)


ODE, OR SONG, BY ALL THE MUSES, CELEBRATION OF HER MAJESTY'S BIRTHDAY    Poem Text    
First Line: Up public joy, remember
Last Line: And charles a caroline!
Subject(s): Henrietta Maria, Queen Of England


ON A ROBBERY    Poem Text    
First Line: Ridway robbed duncote of three hundred pound
Last Line: The courtier is become the greater thief.
Subject(s): Crime & Criminals


ON CHEVERIL THE LAWYER    Poem Text    
First Line: No cause, nor client fat, will cheveril leese
Last Line: For this: that wins, for whom he holds his peace.
Subject(s): Law & Lawyers; Attorneys


ON DON SURLY    Poem Text    
First Line: Don surly to aspire the glorious name
Last Line: Style thee a most great fool, but no great man.


ON ENGLISH MONSIEUR    Poem Text    
First Line: Would you believe, when you this monsieur see
Last Line: Daily to turn in paul's, and help the trade.
Subject(s): France


ON GILES AND JOAN    Poem Text    
First Line: Who says that giles and joan at discord be?
Last Line: I know no couple better can agree!


ON GROIN    Poem Text    
First Line: Groin, come of age, his state sold out of hand
Last Line: For his whore: groin doth still occupy his land.


ON HONOURED POEMS OF HIS HONOURED FRIEND SIR JOHN BEAUMONT    Poem Text    
First Line: This book will live; it hath a genius: this
Last Line: Of ethnicism, makes his muse a saint.
Subject(s): Beaumont, Sir John (1583-1627)


ON LIEUTENANT SHIFT    Poem Text    
First Line: Shift, here in town not meanest among squires
Last Line: Lent him a pocky whore. She hath paid him.


ON LUCY, COUNTESS OF BEDFORD    Poem Text    
First Line: This morning, timely rapt with holy fire
Last Line: My muse bad, bedford write, and that was she.
Subject(s): Bedford, Lucy, Countess Of (1581-1627); Russell, Lucy, Countess Of Bedford


ON MARGARET RATCLIFFE    Poem Text    
First Line: Marble, weep! For thou dost cover
Last Line: E arth, thou hast not such another.
Subject(s): Consolation


ON MY FIRST DAUGHTER    Poem Text    
First Line: Here lies to each her parents' ruth
Last Line: Which cover lightly, gentle earth!
Variant Title(s): Epitaph On My First Daughter
Subject(s): Daughters; Death - Children; Parents; Death - Babies; Parenthood


ON PLAYWRIGHT (1)    Poem Text    
First Line: Playwright, convict of public wrongs to men
Last Line: Active in 's brain, and passive in his bones.
Subject(s): Plays & Playwrights ; Dramatists


ON PLAYWRIGHT (2)    Poem Text    
First Line: Playwright, by chance, hearing some toys I'd writ
Last Line: The liberty, that we'll enjoy tonight.
Subject(s): Plays & Playwrights ; Dramatists


ON REFORMED GAMESTER    Poem Text    
First Line: Lord, how is gamester changed! His hair close cut
Last Line: The body's stripes, I see, the soul may save.


ON SIR COD THE PERFUMED    Poem Text    
First Line: That cod can get no widow, yet a knight
Last Line: I scent the cause: he woos with an ill sprite.
Subject(s): Smells; Odors; Aromas; Fragrances


ON SOMETHING THAT WALKS SOMEWHERE    Poem Text    
First Line: At court I met it, in clothes brave enough
Last Line: "for I will dare none."" good lord, walk dead still."
Subject(s): Facades; Appearances


ON THE AUTHOR, WORK, AND TRANSLATOR    Poem Text    
First Line: Who tracks this author's, or translator's pen
Last Line: That would have done that which you only can.
Subject(s): Mabbes, Thomas (1572-1642); Translating & Interpreting


ON THE FAMOUS VOYAGE    Poem Text    
First Line: No more let greece her bolder fables tell
Last Line: My muse had ploughed with his, that sung a-jax.


ON THE KING'S BIRTHDAY    Poem Text    
First Line: Rouse up thyself, my gentle muse
Last Line: That best of crowns is such a love.
Subject(s): Charles I, King Of England (1600-1649)


ON THE MAGNETIC LADY    Poem Text    
First Line: But to advise thee, ben, in this strict age
Last Line: Cropped, branded, slit, neck-stocked; go, you are stripped.
Subject(s): Critics & Criticism


ON THE NEW HOT-HOUSE    Poem Text    
First Line: Where lately harboured many a famous whore
Last Line: And still be a whore house. They are synonima.
Subject(s): Prostitution; Harlots; Whores; Brothels


ON THE NEW MOTION    Poem Text    
First Line: See you yond' motion? Not the old fading
Last Line: Only his clothes have over-leavened him.


ON THE PORTRAIT OF SHAKESPEARE    Poem Text    
First Line: This figure, that thou here seest put
Last Line: Not at his picture, but his book.
Variant Title(s): To The Reader
Subject(s): Books; Dramatists; Droeshout, Martin; Engraving & Engravers; Plays & Playwrights ; Poetry & Poets; Shakespeare, William (1564-1616); Writing & Writers; Reading; Dramatists


ON THE RIGHT HONOURABLE AND VIRTUOUS LORD WESTON, HIGH TREASURER    Poem Text    
First Line: Look up, thou seed of envy, and still bring
Last Line: To effect it; feel, thou hast made thine own heart ache.
Subject(s): Weston, Richard. 1st Earl Of Portland


ON THE TOWN'S HONEST MAN    Poem Text    
First Line: You wonder, who this is! And why I name
Last Line: Then, the town's honest man's her errant'st knave.
Subject(s): Jones, Inigo (1573-1652)


ON THE UNION    Poem Text    
First Line: When was there contract better driven by fate?
Last Line: The spoused pair two realms, the sea the ring.


PLEASURE RECONCILED TO VIRTUE, SELECTION    Poem Text    
First Line: An eye of looking back were well
Last Line: Though place here make you known.


PLEASURE RECONCILED TO VIRTUE, SELECTION    Poem Text    
First Line: It follows now you are to prove
Last Line: But ever overcome it.


PLEASURE RECONCILED TO VIRTUE, SELECTION    Poem Text    
First Line: Come on, come on, and where you go
Last Line: As he hath power to rise to it.


PLEASURE RECONCILED TO VIRTUE: HYMN TO COMUS    Poem Text    
First Line: Room, room, make room for the bouncing belly
Last Line: Thou break'st all thy girdles, and break'st forth a god.
Variant Title(s): Hymn To The Belly;comus's Song
Subject(s): Bellies; Gluttony


POETASTER: SONG (1)    Poem Text    
First Line: Wake! Our mirth begins to die
Last Line: Which doth all the rest excel.


POETASTER: SONG (2)    Poem Text    
First Line: Blush, folly, blush: here's none that fears
Last Line: And apes are apes, though clothed in scarlet.


POETASTER: SONG (3)    Poem Text    
First Line: Love is blind, and a wanton
Last Line: Or she will undo him.


POETASTER: SONG (4)    Poem Text    
First Line: If I freely may discover
Last Line: Neither her peevishness annoy me.
Subject(s): Martial (40-104)


PROLUDIUM    Poem Text    
First Line: An elegy? No, muse, it asks a strain
Last Line: And now an epode, to deep ears, we sing.


SEJANUS, HIS FALL    Poem Text    
First Line: Hail, caius silius
Last Line: Thus low and little, 'fore the even doth lie.
Subject(s): Sejanus, Lucius Aelius (D. 31 A.d.)


STAY, VIEW THIS STONE: AND, IF THOU BEEST NOT SUCH       


SWELL ME A BOWL WITH LUSTY WINE       


THE DEDICATION OF HE KING'S NEW CELLAR. TO BACCHUS    Poem Text    
First Line: Since, bacchus, thou art father
Last Line: And charles brings home the lady.


THE DREAM    Poem Text    
First Line: Or scorn, or pity on me take
Last Line: As since he dares not come within my sight.
Subject(s): Sleep


THE GHYRLOND OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARIE    Poem Text    
First Line: Here, are five letters in this blessed name
Last Line: As if they adored the head, whereon they're fixed.
Variant Title(s): The Garland Of The Blessed Virgin Mary
Subject(s): Mary. Mother Of Jesus; Women In The Bible; Virgin Mary


THE GYPSIES METAMORPHOSED: GIPSY SONG (1)    Poem Text    
First Line: The fairy beam upon you
Last Line: And the luckier lot betide you.
Variant Title(s): Patrico's Song;a Wish


THE GYPSIES METAMORPHOSED: GIPSY SONG (2)    Poem Text    
First Line: To the old, long life and treasure
Last Line: To the jealous, his own false terrors.


THE GYPSIES METAMORPHOSED: JACKMAN'S SONG (1)    Poem Text    
First Line: From the famous peak of derby
Last Line: We'd be loth to make a hurly.


THE GYPSIES METAMORPHOSED: JACKMAN'S SONG (2)    Poem Text    
First Line: Cocklorrel woulds needs have the devil his guest
Last Line: From whence it was called the devil's arse.


THE HADDINGTON MASQUE: EPITHALAMION    Poem Text    
First Line: Up, youths and virgins, up, and praise
Last Line: Shine, hesperus, shine forth, thou wished star!
Subject(s): Wedding Song; Epithalamium


THE HOUR-GLASS    Poem Text    
First Line: Do but consider this small dust, here running in the glass
Last Line: Even ashes of lovers find no rest.
Variant Title(s): On A Lover's Dust, Made Sand For An Hour-glass
Subject(s): Hourglasses; Love; Time


THE HUMBLE PETITION OF POOR BEN TO .. KING CHARLES    Poem Text    
First Line: Doth most humbly show it
Last Line: You'ld read a snake, in his next song.
Subject(s): Charles I, King Of England (1600-1649)


THE LADY VENETIA DIGBY; HER RELATION TO THE SAINTS    Poem Text    
First Line: Twere time that I died too, now she is dead
Last Line: The vision of our saviour, face to face. . . .
Subject(s): Digby, Lady Venetia


THE MASQUE OF AUGURS: APOLLO'S SONG    Poem Text    
First Line: Which way, and whence the lightning flew
Last Line: In this night's art.


THE MASQUE OF AUGURS: BALLAD    Poem Text    
First Line: Though it may seem rude
Last Line: And the beggars shall give ye room.


THE MASQUE OF CHRISTMAS    Poem Text    
First Line: Now god preserve, as you well do deserve
Last Line: O, but log was too heavy to dance it.
Subject(s): Christmas; Nativity, The


THE MIND OF THE FRONTISPIECE TO A BOOK    Poem Text    
First Line: From death and dark oblivion (near the same)
Last Line: The light of truth, and life of memory.
Subject(s): Art & Artists; Books; Engraving & Engravers; Reading


THE MUSICAL STRIFE; IN A PASTORAL DIALOGUE    Poem Text    
First Line: Come, with our voices, let us war
Last Line: May wish us of their choir.


THE NATIVITY    Poem Text    
First Line: I sing the birth was born tonight
Last Line: Can man forget this story?
Variant Title(s): A Hymn On The Nativity Of My Saviour;a Hymn For The The Nativity Of My Savior
Subject(s): Bible; Christmas; Religion; Nativity, The; Theology


THE NEW CRY    Poem Text    
First Line: Ere cherries ripe, and strawberries be gone
Last Line: That know not so much state, wrong, as they do.


THE NEW INN: A VISION OF BEAUTY    Poem Text    
First Line: It was a beauty that I saw
Last Line: All beauty! -- and without a spot.
Variant Title(s): "perfect Beauty;""it Was A Beauty That I Saw"" (From The New Inn);
Subject(s): Admiration; Beauty


THE PHOENIX ANALYSED    Poem Text    
First Line: Now, after all, let no man
Last Line: But a bare type and figure.
Subject(s): Phoenix (Mythical Bird)


THE REVERSE ON THE BACK SIDE    Poem Text    
First Line: These mysteries do point to three more great
Last Line: Of being daughter, mother, spouse of god.


THE SINNER'S SACRIFICE (TO THE HOLY TRINITY)    Poem Text    
First Line: O holy, blessed, glorious trinity
Last Line: Shall I there rest!


THE TOUCHSTONE OF TRUTH    Poem Text    
First Line: Truth is the trial of itself
Last Line: Of the most worthy love.
Variant Title(s): Truth;on Truth;to James Warre
Subject(s): Truth


TO A WEAK GAMESTER IN POETRY    Poem Text    
First Line: With thy small stock, why are thou venturing still
Last Line: There's no vexation, that can make thee prime.
Subject(s): Poetry & Poets


TO ALCHEMISTS    Poem Text    
First Line: If all you boast of your great art be true
Last Line: Sure, willing poverty lives most in you.
Subject(s): Alchemy & Alchemists


TO ALL TO WHOM I WRITE    Poem Text    
First Line: May none whose scattered names honour my book
Last Line: And, I a poet here, no herald am.
Subject(s): Poetry & Poets


TO ALPHONSO [ALFONSO] FERRABOSCO, ON HIS BOOK    Poem Text    
First Line: To urge, my loved alphonso, that bold fame
Last Line: Shed in thy songs; 'tis true: but short of thee.
Subject(s): Ferrabosco, Alphonso (1575-1628); Music & Musicians


TO BENJAMIN RUDYERD    Poem Text    
First Line: Rudyerd, as lesser dames, to great ones use
Last Line: That strives, his manners should precede his wit.
Subject(s): Rudyerd, Sir Benjamin (1572-1658)


TO BRAIN-HARDY    Poem Text    
First Line: Hardy, thy brain is valiant, 'tis confest
Last Line: He that dares damn himself, dares more than fight.


TO CAPTAIN HUNGRY    Poem Text    
First Line: Do what you come for, captain, with your news
Last Line: Do what you come for, captain, there's your meat.
Subject(s): Gainford, Captain Thomas


TO CELIA    Poem Text    
First Line: Kiss me, sweet; the wary lover
Last Line: What their number is, be pined.
Subject(s): Innocence; Love


TO CLEMENT EDMONDS, ON HIS CAESAR'S COMMENTARIES OBSERVED (2)    Poem Text    
First Line: Who edmonds, reads thy book and doth not see
Last Line: They murder him again, that envy thee.
Subject(s): Edmondes, Clement (1564-1622); History; Rome, Italy; Historians


TO CLEMENT EDWARDS, ON HIS CAESAR'S COMMENTARIES OBSERVED (1)    Poem Text    
First Line: Not caesar's deeds, nor all his honours won
Last Line: His life, but makes, that he can die no more.
Subject(s): Edmondes, Clement (1564-1622); History; Rome, Italy; Historians


TO DOCTOR EMPIRIC    Poem Text    
First Line: When men a dangerous disease did 'scape
Last Line: From my disease's danger, and from thee.
Variant Title(s): To Doctor Empirick
Subject(s): Medicine; Physicians; Drugs, Prescription; Doctors


TO EDWARD ALLEN (ALLEYNE)    Poem Text    
First Line: If rome so great, and in her wisest age
Last Line: So many poets life, by one should live.
Subject(s): Actors & Actresses; Alleyn, Edward (1566-1625); Actresses; Allen, Edward (1566-1625); Alleyne, Edward (1566-1625)


TO ELIZABETH, COUNTESS OF RUTLAND    Poem Text    
First Line: That poets are far rarer births than kings
Last Line: As he would burn or better far his book.
Subject(s): Poetry & Poets; Sidney, Elizabeth. Countess Of Rutland; Sidney, Sir Philip (1554-1586)


TO ESME, LORD AUBIGNY    Poem Text    
First Line: Is there a hope, that man would thankful be
Last Line: To thank thy benefits: which is, to pay.
Subject(s): Stuart, Esme, Lord Aubigny (1574-1624)


TO FINE GRAND    Poem Text    
First Line: What is't, fine grand, makes thee my friendship fly
Last Line: For which, or pay me quickly, or I'll pay you.


TO FINE LADY WOULD-BE    Poem Text    
First Line: Fine madam would-be, wherefore should you fear
Last Line: Of the not born, yet buried, here's the tomb.
Subject(s): Duplicity; Infertility; Pregnancy; Deceit


TO FRANCIS BEAUMONT    Poem Text    
First Line: How I do love thee, beaumont, and thy muse
Last Line: For writing better, I must envy thee.
Subject(s): Beaumont, Francis (1584-1616); Dramatists; Plays & Playwrights ; Dramatists


TO HE LONDON READER, ON ODCOMBIAN WRITER, POLYTOPIAN THOMAS    Poem Text    
First Line: Whoever he be, would write a story at
Last Line: The height, let him learn of mr tom coriat.
Subject(s): Coriat, Thomas (1577-1617); Coriate, Thomas


TO HEAVEN    Poem Text    
First Line: Good and great god! Can I not think of thee
Last Line: For weariness of life, not love of thee.
Subject(s): Bible; Heaven; Religion; Paradise; Theology


TO HIS FRIEND THE AUTHOR UPON HIS RICHARD    Poem Text    
First Line: When these, and such, their voices have employed
Last Line: Thy richard, raised in song, past pulling down.
Subject(s): Brooke, Christopher (1570-1628)


TO HIS LADY, THEN MISTRESS CARY    Poem Text    
First Line: Retired, with purpose your fair worth to praise
Last Line: Cary my love is, daphne but my tree.'
Subject(s): Cary, Anne; Uvedale, Sir William (D. 1652)


TO HIS MUCH AND WORTHILY ESTEEMED FRIEND THE AUTHOR    Poem Text    
First Line: Who takes thy volume to his virtuous hand
Last Line: To understand, he may at length admire.
Subject(s): Authors & Authorship


TO INIGO, MARQUESS WOULD BE, A COROLLARY    Poem Text    
First Line: But cause thou hear'st the mighty king of spain
Last Line: We'll have thee styled the marquess of newditch.
Subject(s): Jones, Inigo (1573-1652)


TO JOHN DONNE (1)    Poem Text    
First Line: Who shall doubt, donne, where I a poet be
Last Line: A man should seek great glory, and not broad.
Subject(s): Donne, John (1572-1631); Poetry & Poets


TO JOHN DONNE (2)    Poem Text    
First Line: Donne, the delight of phoebus and each muse
Last Line: But leave, because I cannot as I should!
Subject(s): Donne, John (1572-1631); Poetry & Poets


TO KING CHARLES AND QUEEN MARY FOR LOSS OF THEIR FIRST-BORN    Poem Text    
First Line: Who dares deny, that all first fruits are due
Last Line: Cannot but heap that grace, he will require.
Subject(s): Death - Children; Death - Babies


TO KING JAMES    Poem Text    
First Line: How, best of kings, dost thou a sceptre bear!
Last Line: Of kings for grace; of poets for my test?
Subject(s): James I, King Of England (1566-1625)


TO KING JAMES; UPON THE HAPPY FALSE RUMOUR OF HIS DEATH    Poem Text    
First Line: That we the loss might know, and thou our love
Last Line: Look not upon thy dangers, but our fears.
Variant Title(s): To King James
Subject(s): James I, King Of England (1566-1625)


TO LUCY, COUNTESS OF BEDFORD    Poem Text    
First Line: Madam, I told you late how I repented
Last Line: Make it your gift. See whither that will bear me.
Subject(s): Bedford, Lucy, Countess Of (1581-1627); Russell, Lucy, Countess Of Bedford


TO LUCY, COUNTESS OF BEDFORD, WITH MR. DONNE'S SATIRES    Poem Text    
First Line: Lucy, you brightness of our sphere, who are
Last Line: The muses evening, as their morning-starre.
Subject(s): Bedford, Lucy, Countess Of (1581-1627); Donne, John (1572-1631); Poetry & Poets; Russell, Lucy, Countess Of Bedford


TO MARY, LADY WROTH (1)    Poem Text    
First Line: Madam, had all antiquity been lost
Last Line: In yourself, all treasure lost of th' age before.
Subject(s): Wroth, Mary Sidney (1586-1652)


TO MARY, LADY WROTH (2)    Poem Text    
First Line: How well, fair crown of your fair sex, might he
Last Line: Becomes none more than you, who need it least.
Subject(s): Wroth, Mary Sidney (1586-1652)


TO MASTER JOHN BURGES    Poem Text    
First Line: Father john burges
Last Line: If the 'chequer be empty, so will be his head.
Subject(s): Money


TO MIME    Poem Text    
First Line: That, not a pair of friends each other see
Last Line: Men love thee not for this: they laugh at thee.
Subject(s): Jones, Inigo (1573-1652)


TO MISTRESS PHILIP SIDNEY    Poem Text    
First Line: I must believe some miracles still be
Last Line: But, in your love, made all his servants wise.
Subject(s): Blindness; Sidney, Mistress Philip (1594-1620); Sidney, Sir Philip (1554-1586); Visually Handicapped


TO MOST NOBLE, AND ABOVE HIS TITLES, ROBERT, EARL SOMERSET    Poem Text    
First Line: They are not those, are present with their face
Last Line: Sure, this glad pair were married, but this day.
Subject(s): Carr, Robert. Earl Of Somerset; Rochester, Viscount (159-1645)


TO MR BEN JONSON IN HIS JOURNEY, BY MR CRAVEN    Poem Text    
First Line: When wit, and learning are so hardly set
Last Line: Although the gait were hard, the gain is sweet.


TO MR JOHN BURGES    Poem Text    
First Line: Would god, my burges, I could think
Last Line: But scarlet-like outlasts the cloth.


TO MR JONSON UPON THESE VERSES    Poem Text    
First Line: Your verses were commended, as 'tis true
Last Line: Thy dirty brains, men smell thy want of worth.
Subject(s): Critics & Criticism


TO MR. JOSHUA SYLVESTER    Poem Text    
First Line: If to admire were to commend, my praise
Last Line: No more, those maiden glories she hath lost.
Subject(s): Sylvester, Joshua (1563-1618); Translating & Interpreting


TO MRS ALICE SUTCLIFFE, ON HER DIVINE MEDITATIONS    Poem Text    
First Line: When I had read your holy meditations
Last Line: Must celia be, the anagram of alice.
Subject(s): Authors & Authorship


TO MY BOOK    Poem Text    
First Line: It will be looked for, book, when some but see
Last Line: For vulgar praise, doth it too dearly buy.
Subject(s): Books; Reading


TO MY BOOKSELLER    Poem Text    
First Line: Thou that mak'st gain thy end, and wisely well
Last Line: Send it to bucklersbury, there 'twill, well.
Subject(s): Books; Reading


TO MY CHOSEN FRIEND, LEARNED TRANSLATOR OF LUCAN, THOMAS MAY    Poem Text    
First Line: When, rome, I read thee in thy mighty pair
Last Line: The sun translated, or the son of may.
Subject(s): May, Thomas (1595-1650); Translating & Interpreting


TO MY DEAR SON, RIGHT-LEARNED FRIEND, MASTER JOSEPH RUTTER    Poem Text    
First Line: You look, my joseph, I should something say
Last Line: Concluded from a carract to a dram.
Subject(s): Authors & Authorship


TO MY LORD IGNORANT    Poem Text    
First Line: Thou call'st me poet, as a term of shame
Last Line: But I have my revenge made, in thy name.


TO MY LORD THE KING, ON THE CHRISTENING HIS SECOND SON JAMES    Poem Text    
First Line: That thou art loved of god, this work is done
Last Line: Oceano secura meo, securior umbris.
Subject(s): Charles I, King Of England (1600-1649); James Ii, King Of England (1633-1701)


TO MY MERE ENGLISH CENSURER    Poem Text    
First Line: To thee my way in epigrams seems new
Last Line: Thy faith is all the knowledge that thou hast.
Subject(s): Critics & Criticism


TO MY OLD FAITHFUL SERVANT, AND MY LOVING FRIEND RICHARD BROME    Poem Text    
First Line: I had you for a servant, once, dick brome
Last Line: He'll be a pilot, scarce can guide a plough.
Subject(s): Brome, Richard (D. 1652)


TO MY TRULY-BELOVED FRIEND, MR. BROWNE: ON HIS PASTORALS    Poem Text    
First Line: Some men of books or friends not speaking right
Last Line: With the 'how much' they set forth, but the 'how well'.
Subject(s): Browne, William (1591-1645)


TO MY WORTHY AND HONOURED FRIEND, MR. GEORGE CHAPMAN    Poem Text    
First Line: Whose work could this be, chapman, to refine
Last Line: And who make thither else, rob, or invade.
Subject(s): Chapman, George (1559-1634); Poetry & Poets; Translating & Interpreting


TO MY WORTHY FRIEND, EDWARD FILMER, ON HIS WORK PUBLISHED    Poem Text    
First Line: What charming peals are these
Last Line: To make the language sweet upon her tongue.
Subject(s): Filmer, Edward (D. 1669)


TO PENSHURST    Poem Text    
First Line: Thou art not, penshurst, built to envious show
Last Line: May say their lords have built, but thy lord dwells.
Subject(s): Animals; Buildings & Builders; Houses; Penshurst, England; Sidney, Sir Philip (1554-1586)


TO SICKNESS    Poem Text    
First Line: Why, disease, dost thou molest
Last Line: None but them, and leave the rest.
Subject(s): Sickness; Small Pox; Illness


TO SIR EDWARD HERBERT    Poem Text    
First Line: If men get name, for some one virtue: then
Last Line: And yet, they, altogether, less than thee.
Subject(s): Herbert, Edward (1583-1648); Herbert Of Cherbury, 1st Baron


TO SIR HENRY CARY    Poem Text    
First Line: That neither fame nor love might wanting be
Last Line: That virtuous is, when the reward's away.
Subject(s): Cary, Sir Henry. 1st Viscount Falkland


TO SIR HENRY GOODYERE    Poem Text    
First Line: When I would know thee, goodyere, my thought looks
Last Line: It was a knowledge, that begat that love.
Variant Title(s): To The Same
Subject(s): Books; Goodyer, Sir Henry (1571-1627); Reading; Goodyere, Sir Henry (1571-1627)


TO SIR HENRY NEVIL    Poem Text    
First Line: Who now calls on thee, nevil, is a muse
Last Line: Whilst others toil for titles to their tombs.
Subject(s): Neville, Sir Henry (1564-1615)


TO SIR HENRY SAVILE [UPON HIS TRANSLATION OF TACITUS]    Poem Text    
First Line: If, my religion safe, I durst embrace
Last Line: That dares nor write things false, nor hide things true.
Subject(s): Savile, Sir Henry (1549-1622); Translating & Interpreting


TO SIR HORACE VERE    Poem Text    
First Line: Which of thy names I take, not only bears
Last Line: Who more should seek men's reverence, than fear.
Subject(s): Vere, Sir Horace (1565-1635)


TO SIR JOHN RADCLIFFE    Poem Text    
First Line: How like a column, radcliffe, left alone
Last Line: Wherewith, against thy blood, they offenders be.
Subject(s): Radcliffe, Sir John (1580-1627)


TO SIR RALPH SHELTON    Poem Text    
First Line: Not he that flies the court for want of clothes
Last Line: Makes the whole longer, than 'twas given him, much.


TO SIR ROBERT WROTH    Poem Text    
First Line: How blest art thou, canst love the country, wroth
Last Line: Though mayst think life, a thing but lent.
Subject(s): Life; Wroth, Sir Robert (1576-1614)


TO SIR THOMAS OVERBURY    Poem Text    
First Line: So phoebus makes me worthy of his bays
Last Line: Who in such ambition can but follow thee.
Subject(s): Overbury, Sir Thomas (1581-1613)


TO SIR THOMAS ROE (1)    Poem Text    
First Line: Thou hast begun well, roe, which stand well too
Last Line: And ever is ill got without the first.
Subject(s): Roe, Sir Thomas (1581-1644)


TO SIR THOMAS ROE (2)    Poem Text    
First Line: That thou hast kept thy love, increased thy will
Last Line: Thy fact is more: let truth encourage thee.
Subject(s): Roe, Sir Thomas (1581-1644)


TO SIR WILLIAM JEPHSON    Poem Text    
First Line: Jephson, thou man of men, to whose loved name
Last Line: A desperate solecism in truth and wit.
Subject(s): Jephson, Sir William (D. 1611)


TO SIR WILLIAM UVEDALE    Poem Text    
First Line: Uvedale, thou piece of the first times, a man
Last Line: I could adore, almost the idolatry.
Subject(s): Uvedale, Sir William (D. 1652)


TO SUSAN, COUNTESS OF MONTGOMERY    Poem Text    
First Line: Were they that named you, prophets? Did they see
Last Line: If not, 'tis fit for you, some should envy.


TO THE AUTHOR    Poem Text    
First Line: In picture, they which truly understand
Last Line: Being told there, reason cannot, sense may err.


TO THE GHOST OF MARTIAL    Poem Text    
First Line: Martial, thou gav'st far nobler epigrams
Last Line: Thou flattered'st thine, mine cannot flattered be.
Subject(s): Martial (40-104)


TO THE KING ON IS BIRTHDAY. AN EPIGRAM. NOVEMBER 19, 1632    Poem Text    
First Line: This is king charles his day. Speak it, thou tower
Last Line: What prayers (people) can you think too much?
Subject(s): Charles I, King Of England (1600-1649)


TO THE LEARNED CRITIC    Poem Text    
First Line: May others fear, fly, and traduce thy name
Last Line: Shall outlive garlands, stol'n from the chaste tree.
Subject(s): Critics & Criticism


TO THE MEMORY OF MY BELOVED MASTER WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE    Poem Text    
First Line: To draw no envy, shakespeare, on thy name
Last Line: And despairs day, but for thy volume's light!
Subject(s): Books; Dramatists; Plays & Playwrights ; Poetry & Poets; Shakespeare, William (1564-1616); Reading; Dramatists


TO THE MEMORY OF THAT MOST HONOURED LADY JANE, COUNTESS OF SHREWSBURY    Poem Text    
First Line: I could begin with that grave form, 'here lies'
Last Line: This second marriage, will eternal make.


TO THE READER    Poem Text    
First Line: Pray thee, take care, tak'st my book in hand
Last Line: To read it well: that is, to understand.
Subject(s): Books; Reading


TO THE RIGHT HON. HIEROME, LORD WESTON; RETURN FROM HIS EMBASSY    Poem Text    
First Line: Such pleasure as the teeming earth
Last Line: And both a strength, and beauty to his land!


TO THE RIGHT HONOURABLE, THE LORD HIGH TREASURER OF ENGLAND    Poem Text    
First Line: My lord / poor wretched states, pressed by extremities
Last Line: A bedrid wit, than a besieged town.
Subject(s): Weston, Richard. 1st Earl Of Portland


TO THE RIGHT HONOURABLE, THE LORD TREASURER OF ENGLAND    Poem Text    
First Line: If to my mind, great lord, I had a state
Last Line: Aloud; and (haply) it may last as long.


TO THE RIGHT NOBLE TOM, TELL-TROTH OF HIS TRAVELS, CORIAT    Poem Text    
First Line: Try and trust roger, was the word, but now
Last Line: Ever his thighs male then, and his brains she.
Subject(s): Coriat, Thomas (1577-1617); Coriate, Thomas


TO THE SAME    Poem Text    
First Line: When we do give, alphonso, to the light
Last Line: For fame, with breath soon kindled, soon blown out.
Subject(s): Ferrabosco, Alphonso (1575-1628); Music & Musicians


TO THE SAME SIR COD    Poem Text    
First Line: The expense in odours is a most vain sin
Last Line: Except thou could'st, sir cod, wear them within.
Subject(s): Smells; Odors; Aromas; Fragrances


TO THE SAME [BENJAMIN RUDYERD] (2)    Poem Text    
First Line: If I would wish, for truth, and not for show
Last Line: Who prov'st, all these were, and again may be.
Subject(s): Rudyerd, Sir Benjamin (1572-1658)


TO THE SAME [BENJAMIN RUDYERD] (3)    Poem Text    
First Line: Writing thyself, or judging others' writ
Last Line: Of the best writer, and judge, should emulate.
Subject(s): Rudyerd, Sir Benjamin (1572-1658)


TO THE WORLD    Poem Text    
First Line: False world, goodnight: since thou hast brought / that hour upon my morn of age
Last Line: Here in my bosom, and at home.
Subject(s): Earth; World


TO THE WORTHY AUTHOR MR JOHN FLETCHER    Poem Text    
First Line: The wise, and many-headed bench, that sits
Last Line: Or moths shall eat, what all these fools admire.
Subject(s): Fletcher, John (1579-1625)


TO THE WORTHY AUTHOR ON THE HUSBAND    Poem Text    
First Line: It fits not only him that makes a book
Last Line: She need not blush upon the marriage day.
Subject(s): Authors & Authorship


TO THOMAS PALMER ON HIS BOOK 'THE SPRITE OF TREES AND HERBS'    Poem Text    
First Line: When late, grave palmer, these thy grafts and flowers
Last Line: And thou in them shalt live as long as fame.
Subject(s): Books; Reading


TO TRUE SOLDIERS    Poem Text    
First Line: Strength of my country, whilst I bring to view
Last Line: But's angry for the captain, still: is such.
Subject(s): Soldiers


TO WILLIAM ROE    Poem Text    
First Line: Roe (and my joy to name) thou art now, to go
Last Line: Came back untouched. This man hath travelled well.
Subject(s): Roe, William (B. 1585)


TO WILLIAM, EARL OF PEMBROKE    Poem Text    
First Line: I do but name thee, pembroke, and I find
Last Line: The commonwealth still safe, must study thee.
Subject(s): Herbert, William, 3d Earl Of Pembroke


TRUE BALM    Poem Text    
First Line: High-spirited friend / I send nor balms nor corsives to your wound
Last Line: Even in youth.
Variant Title(s): An Ode;the Noble Balm
Subject(s): Courage; Valor; Bravery


VERSES AT THE DEVIL TAVERN    Poem Text    
First Line: Welcome all that lead or follow
Last Line: To the oracle of apollo.
Variant Title(s): Inscription Over The Door At The Entrance Into The Apollo;over The Door At The Entrance Into The Apollo
Subject(s): London


VISION OF BEN JONSON, ON MUSES OF HIS FRIEND M. DRAYTON    Poem Text    
First Line: It hath been questioned, michael, if I be
Last Line: If I can be a friend, and friend to thee.
Subject(s): Drayton, Michael (1563-1631)


VOLPONE: FOOLS    Poem Text    
First Line: Fools, they are the only nation
Last Line: He, he, he?
Variant Title(s): Nano's Song


VOLPONE: SONG    Poem Text    
First Line: You that would last long, list to my song
Last Line: Here's medicine, for the nones.


VOLPONE: SONG    Poem Text    
First Line: Had old hippocrates, or galen
Last Line: Or paracelsus, with his long-sword.


WHY I WRITE NOT OF LOVE    Poem Text    
First Line: Some act of love's bound to rehearse
Last Line: When love is fled, and I grow old.
Subject(s): Love; Writing & Writers


WITCHES' CHARM (3)    Poem Text    
First Line: The owl is abroad, the bat, and the toad
Last Line: Let all be dumb.
Variant Title(s): Witches' Chasm;charm
Subject(s): Witchcraft & Witches


WOMEN MEN'S SHADOWS    Poem Text    
First Line: Follow a shadow, it still flies you
Last Line: Styled but the shadows of us men!
Variant Title(s): Song: That Women Are But Men's Shadows;the Shadow
Subject(s): Courtship; Shadows; Women