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Author: spenser, edmund
Matches Found: 178


Spenser, Edmund    Poet's Biography
Alternate Author Name(s): Clout, Colin
178 poems available by this author


AMORETTI (COMPLETE)    Poem Text    
Subject(s): Courtship; Love


AMORETTI: 1    Poem Text    
First Line: Happy ye leaves! When as those lily hands
Last Line: Whom if ye please, I care for other none.
Variant Title(s): "to His Book;""happy Ye Leaves When As Those Lilly Hands,"";
Subject(s): Authors & Authorship; Books; Reading


AMORETTI: 10    Poem Text    
First Line: Unrighteous lord of love, what law is this
Last Line: As she doth laugh at me, and makes my pain her sport.
Subject(s): Prayer; Love Complaints


AMORETTI: 11    Poem Text    
First Line: Daily when I do seek and sue for peace
Last Line: But mine no price nor prayer may surcease.
Subject(s): Love Unrequited


AMORETTI: 12    Poem Text    
First Line: One day I sought with her heart-thrilling eyes
Last Line: Against your eies that justice I may gaine.
Subject(s): Justice


AMORETTI: 13    Poem Text    
First Line: In that proud port which her so goodly graceth
Last Line: Such lowlinesse shall make you lofty be.
Subject(s): Pride


AMORETTI: 14    Poem Text    
First Line: Return again, my forces late dismayed
Last Line: So dying live, and living do adore her.
Subject(s): Love Unrequited


AMORETTI: 15    Poem Text    
First Line: Ye trade-full merchants that with weary toil
Last Line: Her mind, adornd with vertues manifold.
Subject(s): Love


AMORETTI: 16    Poem Text    
First Line: One day as I unwarily did gaze
Last Line: Yet as it was, I hardly scap't with paine.
Subject(s): Love Unrequited; Pain


AMORETTI: 17    Poem Text    
First Line: The glorious portrait of that angel's face
Last Line: That can expresse the life of things indeed.
Variant Title(s): Her Portrait
Subject(s): Beauty; Virtue


AMORETTI: 18    Poem Text    
First Line: The rolling wheel that runneth often round
Last Line: Whiles she as steele and flint doth still remayne.
Variant Title(s): "the Rolling Wheele That Runneth Often Round,"";
Subject(s): Love Complaints


AMORETTI: 19    Poem Text    
First Line: The merry cuckoo, messenger of spring
Last Line: Ere cuckow end, let her a rebell be.
Variant Title(s): The Merry Cuckoo
Subject(s): Birds; Cuckoos


AMORETTI: 2    Poem Text    
First Line: Unquiet thought! Whom at the first I bred
Last Line: If not, die soone, and I with thee will perish.
Subject(s): Courtsdhip; Poetry & Poets


AMORETTI: 20    Poem Text    
First Line: In vain I seek and sue to her for grace
Last Line: That ye were blooded in a yeelded pray.
Subject(s): Cruelty


AMORETTI: 21    Poem Text    
First Line: Was it the work of nature or of art
Last Line: Such art of eyes I never read in bookes.
Subject(s): Beauty


AMORETTI: 22    Poem Text    
First Line: This holy season, fit to fast and pray
Last Line: Amongst thy deerest relicks to be kept.
Variant Title(s): "this Holy Season Fit To Fast And Pray,"";
Subject(s): Love Nature Of


AMORETTI: 23    Poem Text    
First Line: Penelope, for her ulysses' [ulisses] sake
Last Line: Whose fruitlesse worke is broken with least wynd.
Variant Title(s): "doing And Undoing;""penelope For Her Ulisses' Sake,"";
Subject(s): Penelope (Mythology); Melancholy


AMORETTI: 24    Poem Text    
First Line: When I behold that beauty's wonderment
Last Line: That for my faults ye will me gently beat.
Subject(s): Pandora (Mythology)


AMORETTI: 25    Poem Text    
First Line: How long shall this like-dying life endure
Last Line: That greater meede at last may turne to mee.
Subject(s): Cruelty


AMORETTI: 26    Poem Text    
First Line: Sweet is the rose but grows upon a brere
Last Line: That endlesse pleasure shall unto me gaine?
Variant Title(s): Sweet And Sour
Subject(s): Flowers; Pain; Plpeasure


AMORETTI: 27    Poem Text    
First Line: Fair proud! Now tell me, why should fair be proud
Last Line: But that which shall you make immortall cherish.
Subject(s): Pride


AMORETTI: 28    Poem Text    
First Line: The laurel-leaf which you this day do wear
Last Line: But in your brest his leafe and love embrace.
Subject(s): Apollo; Daphne (Mythology)


AMORETTI: 29    Poem Text    
First Line: See! How the stubborn damsel doth deprave
Last Line: And fill the world with her victorious prayse.
Subject(s): Love


AMORETTI: 3    Poem Text    
First Line: The sovereign beauty which I do admire
Last Line: The wonder that my wit cannot endite.
Subject(s): Beauty


AMORETTI: 30    Poem Text     Recitation
First Line: My love is like to ice, and I to fire
Last Line: That it can alter all the course of kynd.
Variant Title(s): "my Love Is Lyke To Yse, And I To Fyre:"";
Subject(s): Love


AMORETTI: 31    Poem Text    
First Line: Ah! Why hath nature to so hard a heart
Last Line: Such cruelty she would have soone abhord.
Subject(s): Beauty; Cruelty


AMORETTI: 32    Poem Text    
First Line: The painful smith with force of fervent heat
Last Line: And she to stones at length all frosen turne?
Subject(s): Heat; Cold; Despair


AMORETTI: 33    Poem Text    
First Line: Great wrong I do, I can it not deny
Last Line: Or lend you me another living brest.
Subject(s): Poetry & Poets


AMORETTI: 34    Poem Text    
First Line: Lyke as a ship, that through the ocean wyde
Last Line: In secret sorrow and sad pensivenesse.
Subject(s): Sea; Ocean


AMORETTI: 35    Poem Text    
First Line: My hungry eyes, through greedy covetise
Last Line: And all their showes but shadowes, saving she.
Subject(s): Eyes


AMORETTI: 36    Poem Text    
First Line: Tell me, when shall these wearie woes have end?
Last Line: Ye shall condemned be of many a one.
Subject(s): Pain


AMORETTI: 37    Poem Text    
First Line: What guile is this, that those her golden tresses
Last Line: To covet fetters, though they golden bee.
Variant Title(s): "what Guyle Is This, That Those Her Golden Tresses,"";
Subject(s): Hair; Innocence; Love


AMORETTI: 38    Poem Text    
First Line: Arion, when through tempest's cruel wrack
Last Line: Then to be blam'd for spilling guiltlesse blood.
Subject(s): Arion (7th Century B.c.)


AMORETTI: 39    Poem Text    
First Line: Sweet smile! The daughter of the queen of love
Last Line: Seem'd every bit which thenceforth I did eat.
Subject(s): Virtue


AMORETTI: 4    Poem Text    
First Line: New year, forth looking out of janus' gate
Last Line: Prepare your selfe new love to entertaine.
Subject(s): Winter; Spring; Youth; Old Age; Life; Death


AMORETTI: 40    Poem Text    
First Line: Mark when she smiles with amiable cheer
Last Line: With that sunshine, when cloudy looks are cleared.
Subject(s): Smiles


AMORETTI: 41    Poem Text    
First Line: Is it her nature, or is it her will
Last Line: That so fayre beauty was so fowly shamed.
Subject(s): Love Complaints


AMORETTI: 42    Poem Text    
First Line: The love which me so cruelly tormenteth
Last Line: And doe me not before my time to dy.
Subject(s): Pain; Grief


AMORETTI: 43    Poem Text    
First Line: Shall I then silent be, or shall I speak?
Last Line: Wil soone conceive, and learne to construe well.
Subject(s): Silence


AMORETTI: 44    Poem Text    
First Line: When those reknonwed noble peers of greece
Last Line: The more I fynd their malice to increace.
Subject(s): Orpheus


AMORETTI: 45    Poem Text    
First Line: Leave, lady! In your glass of crystal clean
Last Line: Remove the cause by which your fayre beames darkned be.
Variant Title(s): "leave, Lady, In Your Glasse Of Christall Clene"";
Subject(s): Mirrors


AMORETTI: 46    Poem Text    
First Line: When my abode's prefixed time is spent
Last Line: The stormes which she alone on me doth raine.
Subject(s): Heaven


AMORETTI: 47    Poem Text    
First Line: Trust not the treason of those smiling looks
Last Line: And thinck they dy with pleasure, live with payne.
Subject(s): Cruelty


AMORETTI: 48    Poem Text    
First Line: Innocent paper! Whom too cruel hand
Last Line: And speake her good, though she requite it ill.
Subject(s): Innocence; Writing & Writers


AMORETTI: 49    Poem Text    
First Line: Fair cruel! Why are ye so fierce and cruel?
Last Line: So shall you live by giving life to me.
Subject(s): Mercy


AMORETTI: 5    Poem Text    
First Line: Rudely thou wrongest my dear heart's desire
Last Line: Without some spark of such self-pleasing pride.
Subject(s): Pride


AMORETTI: 50    Poem Text    
First Line: Long languishing in double malady
Last Line: And with one salve both hart and body heale.
Subject(s): Sickness


AMORETTI: 51    Poem Text    
First Line: Do I not see that fairest images
Last Line: But having her, my joy wil be the greater.
Subject(s): Beauty; Persistence


AMORETTI: 52    Poem Text    
First Line: So oft as homeward I from her depart
Last Line: That of her presens I my meed may take.
Subject(s): Grief; Reconciliation


AMORETTI: 53    Poem Text    
First Line: The panther, knowing that his spotted hide
Last Line: As in theyr maker ye them best may see.
Subject(s): Panthers


AMORETTI: 54    Poem Text    
First Line: Of this world's theatre in which we stay
Last Line: She is no woman, but a sencelesse stone.
Variant Title(s): A Hard Audience
Subject(s): Conceit


AMORETTI: 55    Poem Text    
First Line: So oft as I her beauty do behold
Last Line: Be lyke in mercy as in all the rest.
Subject(s): Beauty


AMORETTI: 56    Poem Text    
First Line: Fair ye be sure, but cruel and unkind
Last Line: Whom ye doe wreck, doe ruine, and destroy.
Subject(s): Beauty


AMORETTI: 57    Poem Text    
First Line: Sweet warrior! When shall I have peace with you?
Last Line: That al my wounds wil heale in little space.
Subject(s): Love Unrequited; Reconciliation


AMORETTI: 58. BY HER THAT IS MOST ASSURED TO HERSELF    Poem Text    
First Line: Weak is the assurance that weak flesh respondeth
Last Line: That to your selfe ye most assured arre?
Subject(s): Pride


AMORETTI: 59    Poem Text    
First Line: Thrice happy she that is so well assured
Last Line: But he most happy who such one loves best.
Variant Title(s): The True Woman
Subject(s): Self-assurance


AMORETTI: 6    Poem Text    
First Line: Be nought dismayed that her unmoved mind
Last Line: To knit the knot that ever shall remaine.
Subject(s): Patience; Oak Trees


AMORETTI: 60    Poem Text    
First Line: They that in course of heavenly spheres are skilled
Last Line: This yeare ensuing, or else short my dayes.
Subject(s): Impatience


AMORETTI: 61    Poem Text    
First Line: The glorious image of the maker's beauty
Last Line: Then dare be lov'd by men of meane degree.
Subject(s): Pride


AMORETTI: 62    Poem Text    
First Line: The weary year his race now having run
Last Line: And chaunge old yeares annoy to new delight.
Subject(s): New Year


AMORETTI: 63    Poem Text    
First Line: After long storms' and tempests' sad assay
Last Line: All sorrowes short that gaine eternall blisse
Subject(s): Marriage


AMORETTI: 64    Poem Text    
First Line: Coming to kiss her lips (such grace I found)
Last Line: But her sweet odour did them all excell.
Variant Title(s): The Garden Of Beauty
Subject(s): Smells; Odors; Aromas; Fragrances


AMORETTI: 65    Poem Text    
First Line: The doubt which ye misdeem, fair love, is vain
Last Line: And spotlesse pleasure builds her sacred bowre.
Subject(s): Love; Love - Marital; Marriage; Wedded Love; Marriage - Love; Weddings; Husbands; Wives


AMORETTI: 66    Poem Text    
First Line: To all those happy blessings which ye have
Last Line: With my reflex yours shall encreased be.
Subject(s): Love


AMORETTI: 67    Poem Text    
First Line: Like as a huntsman after weary chase
Last Line: So goodly wonne, with her owne will beguyld.
Variant Title(s): "lyke As A Huntsman After Weary Chace,"";
Subject(s): Free Will & Determinism


AMORETTI: 68    Poem Text    
First Line: Most glorious lord of life, that on this day
Last Line: Love is the lesson which the lord us taught.
Variant Title(s): "easter Day;christ's True Love's Example;easter Morning;sonnet On Easter;easter;""most Glorious Lord Of Lyfe That On This Day"";
Subject(s): Bible; Easter; Holidays; Jesus Christ; Redemption; Religion; Resurrection, The; The Resurrection; Theology


AMORETTI: 69    Poem Text    
First Line: The famous warriors of the antique world
Last Line: Gotten at last with labour and long toyle.
Subject(s): War; Immortality


AMORETTI: 7    Poem Text    
First Line: Fair eyes! The mirror of my mazed heart
Last Line: Such death the sad ensample of your might.
Subject(s): Eyes


AMORETTI: 70    Poem Text    
First Line: Fresh spring, the herald of love's mighty king
Last Line: For none can call againe the passed time.
Subject(s): Carpe Diem; Love


AMORETTI: 71    Poem Text    
First Line: I joy to see how in your drawen work
Last Line: Betweene the spyder and the gentle bee.
Variant Title(s): "i Joy To See How In Your Drawen Work,"";
Subject(s): Drawing


AMORETTI: 72    Poem Text    
First Line: Oft when my spirit doth spread her bolder wings
Last Line: But here on earth to have such hevens blisse.
Subject(s): Beauty


AMORETTI: 73    Poem Text    
First Line: Being myself captivated here in care
Last Line: Him lodging in your bosome to have lent.
Subject(s): Passion


AMORETTI: 74    Poem Text    
First Line: Most happy letters! Framed by skillful trade
Last Line: That three such graces did unto me give.
Subject(s): Women


AMORETTI: 75    Poem Text     Recitation
First Line: One day I wrote her name upon the strand
Last Line: Our love shall live, and later life renew.
Variant Title(s): "her Name;our Love Shall Live;to Immortalise His Love;one Day I Wrote Her Name;eternizing Her;""one Day I Wrote Her Name Upon The Strand,"";
Subject(s): Art & Artists; Immortality; Love; Names; Seashore; Thought; Beach; Coast; Shore; Thinking


AMORETTI: 76    Poem Text    
First Line: Fair bosom! Fraught with virtues' richest treasure
Last Line: Which oft I wisht, yet never was so blest.
Subject(s): Breasts


AMORETTI: 77    Poem Text    
First Line: Was it a dream, or did I see it plain?
Last Line: My thoughts the guests, which would thereon have fedd.
Subject(s): Food & Eating


AMORETTI: 78    Poem Text    
First Line: Lacking my love, I go from place to place
Last Line: And let my thoughts behold her selfe in mee.
Variant Title(s): "lacking My Love I Go From Place To Place,"";
Subject(s): Absence


AMORETTI: 79    Poem Text    
First Line: Men call you fair, and you do credit it
Last Line: All other fayre, lyke flowres, untymely fade.
Variant Title(s): "the True Fair;""man Call You Fayre, And You Doe Credit It,"";
Subject(s): Beauty


AMORETTI: 8    Poem Text    
First Line: More than most fair, full of the living fire
Last Line: Well is he borne that may behold you ever.
Variant Title(s): "love In Absence;""more Then Most Faire, Full Of The Living Fire,"";
Subject(s): Beauty; Inspiration


AMORETTI: 80    Poem Text    
First Line: After so long a race as I have run
Last Line: Fit for the handmayd of the faery queene.
Subject(s): Poetry & Poets


AMORETTI: 81    Poem Text    
First Line: Fair is my love when her fair golden hairs
Last Line: But this the worke of harts astonishment.
Subject(s): Beauty


AMORETTI: 82    Poem Text    
First Line: Joy of my life! Full oft for loving you
Last Line: Shall lift you up unto an high degree.
Subject(s): Love Marital


AMORETTI: 83    Poem Text    
First Line: Let not one spark of filthy lustful fire
Last Line: And blesse your fortunes fayre election.
Subject(s): Eyes


AMORETTI: 84    Poem Text    
First Line: The world, that cannot deem of worthy things
Last Line: Let the world chose to envy or to wonder.
Subject(s): Prayer


AMORETTI: 85    Poem Text    
First Line: Venomous tongue, tipped with vile adder's sting
Last Line: Due to thy selfe, that it for me prepard.
Subject(s): Criticism & Critics


AMORETTI: 86    Poem Text    
First Line: Since I did leave the presence of my love
Last Line: But joyous houres doo fly away too fast.
Subject(s): Time


AMORETTI: 87    Poem Text    
First Line: Since I have lacked the comfort of that light
Last Line: I starve my body, and mine eyes doe blynd.
Subject(s): Absence


AMORETTI: 88    Poem Text    
First Line: Like as the culver on the bared bough
Last Line: And dead my life that wants such lively blis.
Variant Title(s): Amoretti: 89
Subject(s): Absence


AMORETTI: 9    Poem Text    
First Line: Long-while I sought to what I might compare
Last Line: Whose light doth lighten all that here we see.
Subject(s): Eyes


AN HYMN IN HONOUR OF BEAUTY    Poem Text    
First Line: Ah! Whither, love, wilt thou now carrie me?
Last Line: That can restore a damned wight from death.
Subject(s): Beauty


AN HYMN IN HONOUR OF LOVE    Poem Text    
First Line: Love, that long since hast to thy mighty powre
Last Line: This simple song, thus fram'd in praise of thee.


AN HYMN OF HEAVENLY BEAUTY    Poem Text    
First Line: Rapt with the rage of mine own ravisht thought
Last Line: Thy straying thoughts henceforth for ever rest.
Subject(s): Beauty


AN HYMN OF HEAVENLY LOVE    Poem Text    
First Line: Love, lift me up upon thy golden wings
Last Line: Kindled through sight of those faire things above.
Subject(s): Beauty; Jesus Christ


ASTROPHEL    Poem Text    
First Line: Shepherds that wont on pipes of oaten reed
Last Line: As fittest flowres to deck his mournfull hearse.
Subject(s): Sidney, Sir Philip (1554-1586)


COLIN CLOUTS COME HOME AGAIN    Poem Text    
First Line: The shepheards boy (best knowen by that name)
Last Line: Warnd them to draw their bleating flocks to rest.
Subject(s): Courts & Courtiers; Homecoming; London; Royal Court Life; Royalty; Kings; Queens


DAPHNAIDA    Poem Text    
First Line: What ever man he be, whose heavie mynd
Last Line: But what of him became I cannot weene.
Subject(s): Death; Dead, The


DISTICH    Poem Text    
First Line: Let no daye passe, passe no part of the day
Last Line: Lest thou doe passe, as dayes doe passe away.


EPIGRAM: 1    Poem Text    
First Line: In youth, before I waxed old
Last Line: He tooke his wings and away did fly.


EPIGRAM: 2    Poem Text    
First Line: As diane hunted on a day
Last Line: But diane beasts with cupids dart.


EPIGRAM: 3    Poem Text    
First Line: I saw, in secret to my dame
Last Line: For many have err'd in this beauty.'


EPIGRAM: 4    Poem Text    
First Line: Upon a day, as love lay sweetly slumbring
Last Line: My pining anguish to appease.
Variant Title(s): Cupid And The Bee


EPITHALAMION    Poem Text    
First Line: Ye learned sisters which have oftentimes
Last Line: And for short time an endlesse moniment.
Subject(s): Love; Love - Marital; Marriage; Wedding Song; Wedded Love; Marriage - Love; Weddings; Husbands; Wives; Epithalamium


I WAS PROMISED ON A TIME    Poem Text    
Last Line: I received nor rhyme nor reason
Subject(s): Poetry & Poets


IAMBICUM TRIMETRUM, FR. LETTER TO HARVEY    Poem Text    
First Line: Unhappie verse, the witnesse of my unhappie state
Last Line: "and I dye, who will saye"" this was, immerito?"
Subject(s): Language; Poetry & Poets; Words; Vocabulary


MUIOPOTMOS, OR THE FATE OF THE BUTTERFLIE    Poem Text    
First Line: I sing of deadly dolorous debate
Last Line: His bodie left the spectacle of care.
Subject(s): Butterflies; Fables; Insects; Mythology; Allegories; Bugs


PROSOPOPOIA, OR MOTHER HUBBERDS TALE    Poem Text    
First Line: It was the month, in which the righteous maide
Last Line: And bad her tongue, that it so bluntly tolde.
Subject(s): Courts & Courtiers; Royal Court Life; Royalty; Kings; Queens


PROTHALAMION    Poem Text    
First Line: Calm was the day, and through the trembling air
Last Line: Sweete themmes, runne softly, till I end my song.
Subject(s): Birds; Marriage; Weddings; Husbands; Wives


RIVERS OF IRELAND    Poem Text    
First Line: Ne thence the irishe rivers absent were
Last Line: To doe their dueful service, as to them befell.
Subject(s): Ireland; Rivers; Irish


SONNET PREFIXED TO 'NENNIO, OR A TREATISE OF NOBILITY'    Poem Text    
First Line: Who so wil seeke by right deserts t'attaine
Last Line: And next to jones, that truely it translated.
Subject(s): Nenna Of Bari, Sir John Baptista; Translating & Interpreting


SONNET PREFIXED TO 'THE COMMONWEALTH & GOVERNMENT OF VENICE'    Poem Text    
First Line: The antique babel, empress of the east
Last Line: Edm. Spencer.
Subject(s): Venice, Italy


SONNET TO MASTER GABRIELL HARVEY, DOCTOR OF LAWES    Poem Text    
First Line: Harvey, the happy above happiest men
Last Line: Your devoted friend, during life,
Subject(s): Harvey, Gabriel (1545-1630)


SONNET UPON HISTORIE OF GEORGE CASTRIOT, ALIAS SCANDERBERG    Poem Text    
First Line: Wherefore doth vaine antiquities so vaunt
Last Line: Thy acts, o scanderbeg, this volume tels.
Subject(s): Kastrioti, George (1405-1468); Castrioti, George; Castriot, George; Skanderbeg; Scanderbeg


SONNET: 13    Poem Text    
First Line: I saw a woman sitting on a beast
Last Line: Now for a truth great babylon is fallen.
Subject(s): Babylon; Bible; Prostitution; Religion; Harlots; Whores; Brothels; Theology


SONNET: 14    Poem Text    
First Line: Then might I see upon a white horse set
Last Line: Is pitiless thrown down in pit of fire.
Subject(s): Bible; Religion; Theology


SONNET: 15    Poem Text    
First Line: I saw new earth, new heaven, said saint john
Last Line: There grows life's fruit unto the churches good.
Subject(s): Bible; Religion; Theology


THE FAERIE QUEENE: BOOK 1, CANTOS 1-3    Poem Text    
First Line: Lo! I the man, whose muse whylome did maske
Last Line: More mild, in beastly kind, then that her beastly foe.
Subject(s): Chaucer, Geoffrey (1342-1400); Country Life; England; Fables; Knights & Knighthood; Language; Morality; Poetry & Poets; Sleep; Virtue; English; Allegories; Words; Vocabulary; Ethics


THE FAERIE QUEENE: BOOK 1, CANTOS 10-12    Poem Text    
First Line: Her faithfull knight faire una brings
Last Line: Well may she speede, and fairely finish her intent.


THE FAERIE QUEENE: BOOK 1, CANTOS 4-6    Poem Text    
First Line: To sinfull hous of pryde duessa
Last Line: And eke this battels end, will need another place.


THE FAERIE QUEENE: BOOK 1, CANTOS 7-9    Poem Text    
First Line: The redcrosse knight is captive made
Last Line: Till he should die his last, that is, eternally.


THE FAERIE QUEENE: BOOK 2, CANTOS 1-3    Poem Text    
First Line: Right well I wote most mighty soueraine
Last Line: And to be easd of that base burden still did erne.
Subject(s): Chaucer, Geoffrey (1342-1400); Country Life; England; Fables; Knights & Knighthood; Language; Morality; Poetry & Poets; Sleep; Virtue; English; Allegories; Words; Vocabulary; Ethics


THE FAERIE QUEENE: BOOK 2, CANTOS 10-12    Poem Text    
First Line: A chronicle of briton kings
Last Line: But let us hence depart, whilest wether serves and winde.'


THE FAERIE QUEENE: BOOK 2, CANTOS 4-6    Poem Text    
First Line: Guyon does furor bind in chaines
Last Line: And him restor'd to helth, that would have algates dyde.


THE FAERIE QUEENE: BOOK 2, CANTOS 7-9    Poem Text    
First Line: Guyon finds mamon in a delve
Last Line: To read those bookes; who gladly graunted their desire.


THE FAERIE QUEENE: BOOK 3, CANTOS 1-3    Poem Text    
First Line: It falls me here to write of chastity
Last Line: The redcrosse knight diverst, but forth rode britomart.
Subject(s): Chaucer, Geoffrey (1342-1400); Country Life; England; Fables; Knights & Knighthood; Language; Morality; Poetry & Poets; Sleep; Virtue; English; Allegories; Words; Vocabulary; Ethics


THE FAERIE QUEENE: BOOK 3, CANTOS 10-12    Poem Text    
First Line: Paridell rapeth hellenore
Last Line: Where let them wend at will, whilest here I doe respire.


THE FAERIE QUEENE: BOOK 3, CANTOS 4-6    Poem Text    
First Line: Bold marinell of britomart
Last Line: And from prince arthure fled with wings of idle feare.


THE FAERIE QUEENE: BOOK 3, CANTOS 7-9    Poem Text    
First Line: The witches sonne loves florimell
Last Line: Them go to rest. So all unto their bowres were brought.


THE FAERIE QUEENE: BOOK 4, CANTOS 1-3    Poem Text    
First Line: The rugged forhead that with grave foresight
Last Line: That since their days such lovers were not found elswhere.
Subject(s): Chaucer, Geoffrey (1342-1400); Country Life; England; Fables; Knights & Knighthood; Language; Morality; Poetry & Poets; Sleep; Virtue; English; Allegories; Words; Vocabulary; Ethics


THE FAERIE QUEENE: BOOK 4, CANTOS 10-12    Poem Text    
First Line: Scudamour doth his conquest tell
Last Line: Which to another place I leave to be perfected.


THE FAERIE QUEENE: BOOK 4, CANTOS 4-6    Poem Text    
First Line: Satyrane makes a turneyment
Last Line: Untill another tyde, that I it finish may.


THE FAERIE QUEENE: BOOK 4, CANTOS 7-9    Poem Text    
First Line: Amoret rapt by greedie lust
Last Line: Comprised be, I will them in another tell.


THE FAERIE QUEENE: BOOK 5, CANTOS 1-3    Poem Text    
First Line: So oft as I with state of present time
Last Line: We on his first adventure may him forward send.
Subject(s): Chaucer, Geoffrey (1342-1400); Country Life; England; Fables; Knights & Knighthood; Language; Morality; Poetry & Poets; Sleep; Virtue; English; Allegories; Words; Vocabulary; Ethics


THE FAERIE QUEENE: BOOK 5, CANTOS 10-12    Poem Text    
First Line: Prince arthur takes the enterprize
Last Line: To faery court, where what him fell shall else be told.


THE FAERIE QUEENE: BOOK 5, CANTOS 4-6    Poem Text    
First Line: Artegall dealeth right betwixt
Last Line: And to their sire their carcasses left to bestow.


THE FAERIE QUEENE: BOOK 5, CANTOS 7-9    Poem Text    
First Line: Britomart comes to isis church
Last Line: Would have the passion hid, and up arose withall.


THE FAERIE QUEENE: BOOK 6, CANTOS 1-3    Poem Text    
First Line: The waies, through which my weary steps I guyde
Last Line: That in another canto shall to end be brought.
Subject(s): Chaucer, Geoffrey (1342-1400); Country Life; England; Fables; Knights & Knighthood; Language; Morality; Poetry & Poets; Sleep; Virtue; English; Allegories; Words; Vocabulary; Ethics


THE FAERIE QUEENE: BOOK 6, CANTOS 10-12    Poem Text    
First Line: Calidore sees the graces daunce
Last Line: And seeke to please, that now is counted wisemens threasure.


THE FAERIE QUEENE: BOOK 6, CANTOS 4-6    Poem Text    
First Line: Calepine by a salvage man
Last Line: And passed forth, to follow his first enterprize.


THE FAERIE QUEENE: BOOK 6, CANTOS 7-9    Poem Text    
First Line: Turpine is baffuld; his two knights
Last Line: Shall more conveniently in other place be ended.


THE FAERIE QUEENE: BOOK 7. TWO CANTOS OF MUTABILITY    Poem Text    
First Line: What man that sees the ever-whirling wheele
Last Line: O that great sabbaoth god graunt me that sabaoths sight!
Subject(s): Chaucer, Geoffrey (1342-1400); Country Life; England; Fables; Knights & Knighthood; Language; Morality; Poetry & Poets; Sleep; Virtue; English; Allegories; Words; Vocabulary; Ethics


THE FAERIE QUEENE: DEDICATORY SONNET .. EARLE NORTHUMBERLAND    Poem Text    
First Line: The sacred muses have made alwaies clame
Last Line: This present of my paines, it to defend.
Subject(s): Percy, Henry. 9th Earl Of Northumberland


THE FAERIE QUEENE: DEDICATORY SONNET TO.. EARLE OF ORMOND    Poem Text    
First Line: Receive, most noble lord, a simple taste
Last Line: Receive, dear lord, in worth, the fruit of barren field.
Subject(s): Butler, Thomas. 10th Earl Of Ormonde


THE FAERIE QUEENE: DEDICATORY SONNET TO.. EARLE OF OXENFORD    Poem Text    
First Line: Receive, most noble lord, in gentle gree
Last Line: That loves and honours thee, as doth behove.


THE FAERIE QUEENE: DEDICATORY SONNET TO.. LADIES IN COURT    Poem Text    
First Line: The chian peincter, when he was requirde
Last Line: Forgive it me, faire dames, sith lesse ye have not lefte.
Subject(s): Courts & Courtiers


THE FAERIE QUEENE: DEDICATORY SONNET TO.. LORD BURLEIGH    Poem Text    
First Line: To you, right noble lord, whose carefull brest
Last Line: And wipe their faults out of your censure grave.
Subject(s): Cecil, William, 1st Baron Burleigh


THE FAERIE QUEENE: DEDICATORY SONNET TO.. LORD OF BUCKHURST    Poem Text    
First Line: In vain I thinke, right honourable lord
Last Line: Against vile zoilus backbitings vaine.
Subject(s): Criticism & Critics; Sackville, Thomas, 1st Earl Of Dorset; Zoilus (4th Century B.c.); Buckhurst, Baron


THE FAERIE QUEENE: DEDICATORY SONNET TO.. SIR FR. WALSINGHAM    Poem Text    
First Line: That mantuane poetes incompared spirit
Last Line: In bigger tunes to sound your living prayse.
Subject(s): Walsingham, Sir Francis (1532-1590)


THE FAERIE QUEENE: DEDICATORY SONNET TO.. SIR JOHN NORRIS    Poem Text    
First Line: Who ever gave more honourable prize
Last Line: Love him that hath eternized your name.
Subject(s): Norris, Sir John (1547-1597)


THE FAERIE QUEENE: DEDICATORY SONNET TO.. SIR WALTER RALEIGH    Poem Text    
First Line: To thee that art the sommers nightingale
Last Line: Let thy faire cinthias praises bee thus rudely showne.
Subject(s): Raleigh, Sir Walter (1552-1618)


THE FAERIE QUEENE: DEDICATORY SONNET TO.. THE EARLE OF ESSEX    Poem Text    
First Line: Magnificke lord, whose vertues excellent
Last Line: To these first labours needed furtheraunce.
Subject(s): Devereux, Robert. 2d Earl Of Essex


THE FAERIE QUEENE: DEDICATORY SONNET TO.. THE LADY CAREW    Poem Text    
First Line: Ne may I, without blot of endlesse blame
Last Line: In ampler wise it selfe will forth display.


THE FAERIE QUEENE: DEDICATORY SONNET.. COUNTESSE OF PEMBROKE    Poem Text    
First Line: Remembraunce of that most heroicke spirit
Last Line: Vouchsafe from him this token in good worth to take.
Subject(s): Herbert, Mary Sidney (1561-1621); Pembroke, Countess Of; Sidney, Mary (1561-1621); Dudley, Mary


THE FAERIE QUEENE: DEDICATORY SONNET.. EARLE OF CUMBERLAND    Poem Text    
First Line: Redoubted lord, in whose corageous mind
Last Line: For honor of your name and high descent.
Subject(s): Clifford, George De (1558-1605); Cumberland, 3rd Earl Of


THE FAERIE QUEENE: DEDICATORY SONNET.. THE LORD OF HUNSDON    Poem Text    
First Line: Renowmed lord, that for your worthinesse
Last Line: That all posteritie thy honor may reherse.
Subject(s): Carey, Henry, 1st Baron Hunsdon


THE FAERIE QUEENE: DEDICATORY SONNET.. TO LORD CH. HOWARD    Poem Text    
First Line: And ye, brave lord, whose goodly personage
Last Line: That it may live to all posterity.
Subject(s): Howard, Charles. 1st Earl Of Nottingham; Howard Of Effingham, Charles, 2d Baron


THE FAERIE QUEENE: DEDICATORY SONNET..SIR CHRISTOPHER HATTON    Poem Text    
First Line: Those prudent heads, that with their counsels wise
Last Line: Which for their titles sake may find more grace.
Subject(s): Hatton, Sir Christopher (1540-1591)


THE FAERIE QUEENE: DEDICATORY SONNETS TO.. THE LORD GREY    Poem Text    
First Line: Most noble lord, the pillor of my life
Last Line: The which vouchsafe, dear lord, your favorable doome.
Subject(s): Grey, Charles, 2d Earl (1764-1845)


THE RIVER MULLA    Poem Text    
First Line: Old father mole, (mole hight that mountain gray
Last Line: Did lose his name: so deare his love he bought.
Subject(s): Mulla [awbeg] (River), Ireland


THE RUINES OF TIME    Poem Text    
First Line: It chaunced me on day beside the shore
Last Line: And loath this drosse of sinfull worlds desire.
Subject(s): Sleep


THE SHEPHEARDES CALENDER: APRIL    Poem Text    
First Line: Tell me, good hobbinoll, what garres thee
Last Line: And twincling starres the daylight hence chase.
Subject(s): April; Country Life; Elizabeth I, Queen Of England (1533-1603


THE SHEPHEARDES CALENDER: AUGUST    Poem Text    
First Line: Tell me, perigot, what shalbe the game
Last Line: The night nigheth fast, yts time to be gone.
Subject(s): August


THE SHEPHEARDES CALENDER: CONCLUSION    Poem Text    
First Line: Loe! I have made a calender for every yeare
Last Line: Merce non mercede.
Subject(s): Seasons


THE SHEPHEARDES CALENDER: DECEMBER    Poem Text    
First Line: The gentle shepheard satte beside a springe
Last Line: Tell rosalind her colin bids her adieu.'
Subject(s): Aging; December; Seasons; Winter


THE SHEPHEARDES CALENDER: DEDICATORY SONNET    Poem Text    
First Line: Goe, little booke: thy self presente
Last Line: Immerito.
Subject(s): Books; Reading


THE SHEPHEARDES CALENDER: FEBRUARY    Poem Text    
First Line: Ah for pittie! Wil rancke winters rage
Last Line: Hye thee home, shepheard, the day is nigh wasted.
Subject(s): February; Old Age


THE SHEPHEARDES CALENDER: JANUARY    Poem Text    
First Line: A shepheards boye (no better doe him call)
Last Line: Whose hanging heads did seeme his carefull case to weepe.
Subject(s): January; Love - Complaints; Winter


THE SHEPHEARDES CALENDER: JULY    Poem Text    
First Line: Is not thilke same a goteheard prowde
Last Line: Thou hast such doubt to climbe.
Subject(s): September; Shepherds & Shepherdesses


THE SHEPHEARDES CALENDER: JUNE    Poem Text    
First Line: Lo, collin, here the place whose pleasaunt syte
Last Line: And wett your tender lambes that by you trace.
Subject(s): June; Love - Complaints


THE SHEPHEARDES CALENDER: MARCH    Poem Text    
First Line: Thomalin, why sytten we soe
Last Line: Yts time to hast us homeward.
Subject(s): Love; March (Month); Spring


THE SHEPHEARDES CALENDER: MAY    Poem Text    
First Line: Is not thilke the mery moneth of may
Last Line: I hold it best for us home to hye.
Variant Title(s): The Old Shepherd's May Song
Subject(s): Country Life; May (Month); Religion; Theology


THE SHEPHEARDES CALENDER: NOVEMBER    Poem Text    
First Line: Colin, my deare, when shall it please thee sing
Last Line: Now gynnes to mizzle, hye we homeward fast.
Subject(s): Mourning; November; Bereavement


THE SHEPHEARDES CALENDER: OCTOBER    Poem Text    
First Line: Cuddie, for shame! Hold up thy heavye head
Last Line: Cuddie shall have a kidde to store his farme.
Subject(s): October


THE SHEPHEARDES CALENDER: SEPTEMBER    Poem Text    
First Line: Diggon davie, I bidde her god day
Last Line: Diggon on fewe such freendes did ever lite.


THE TEARES OF THE MUSES    Poem Text    
First Line: Rehearse to me ye sacred sisters nine
Last Line: The rest untold no living tongue can speake.
Subject(s): Poetry & Poets


VERSES UPON THE SAID EARLES LUTE    Poem Text    
First Line: Whilst vitall sapp did make me spring
Last Line: The muses nine this voice did send.
Subject(s): Boyle, Richard, Earl Of Cork,(1566-1643); Lutes


VIRGILS GNAT    Poem Text    
First Line: We now have playde (augustus) wantonly
Last Line: The shepheard hath thy deaths record engraved.
Subject(s): Gnats; Virgil (70-19 B.c.); Vergil


VIRGILS GNAT: DEDICATORY SONNET    Poem Text    
First Line: Wrong'd, yet not daring to expresse my paine
Last Line: May by this gnatts complaint be easily knowen.
Subject(s): Dudley, Robert. 1st Earl Of Leicester; Gnats


VISIONS OF THE WORLDS VANITIE    Poem Text    
First Line: One day, whiles that my daylie cares did sleepe
Last Line: Shall finde his state most fickle and unsure.
Subject(s): Fables; Allegories