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A POISON TREE, FR. SONGS OF EXPERIENCE, by             Poet Analysis     Poet's Biography

"A Poison Tree" is a poem from William Blake's collection, Songs of Experience, which was published in 1794. The poem is a metaphorical exploration of the destructive power of anger and the importance of forgiveness.

In the poem, Blake describes how his anger towards a friend grew into a poisonous tree, which he nurtured with his "watering can" and "sunshine." The tree eventually bore "an apple bright" which he offered to his friend. However, when his friend ate the apple, he died, and the speaker was "glad" that his enemy was no more.

The poem is a metaphor for the destructive power of anger and the importance of forgiveness. The tree represents the speaker's anger, and the apple represents the consequences of that anger. The poem suggests that when anger is nurtured and allowed to grow, it can become a destructive force that harms not only the person who is angry but also the people around them.

The poem's message is further emphasized by its structure and language. The first stanza is written in a simple, straightforward style, which contrasts with the more complex and metaphorical language used in the second stanza. This contrast emphasizes the destructive power of the speaker's anger and the importance of recognizing and dealing with it.

The poem's conclusion, where the speaker is "glad" that his enemy is no more, is a chilling reminder of the consequences of anger and the need for forgiveness. The poem suggests that forgiveness is the only way to break the cycle of anger and destruction.

Overall, "A Poison Tree" is a powerful exploration of the destructive power of anger and the importance of forgiveness. Blake's use of metaphor and structure is effective in conveying his message, and the poem remains a relevant commentary on the destructive nature of anger in society today.


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