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Classic and Contemporary Poetry: Explained

LOVE POEM FOR THE FORTY-SECOND STREET LIBRARY, by             Poet Analysis     Poet's Biography

"Love Poem for the Forty-Second Street Library" is a poem by David Ignatow, first published in his 1977 collection "Rescue the Dead". The poem is a love letter to the library and the role it plays in the speaker's life.

Explanation:

The speaker describes the library as a place of refuge and solace, where he can escape from the chaos of the city and find peace among the books. He appreciates the quiet and calm of the library, and the way it provides a sense of purpose and belonging.

Poetic Elements:

  • Form: Free verse
  • Imagery: The use of sensory details, such as the "oiled wood floors" and the "smooth marble counters", creates a vivid picture of the library.
  • Metaphor: The library is compared to a "cathedral", highlighting its importance and sanctity to the speaker.
  • Tone: The tone is reverential and admiring, emphasizing the speaker's love for the library.

Conclusion:

Overall, "Love Poem for the Forty-Second Street Library" is a heartfelt tribute to the library and the role it plays in the speaker's life. It celebrates the beauty and importance of books and the quiet spaces where one can find peace and solitude.

Poem Snippet:

 

"The library is a whispering post.

You don't need to take a book with you,

the book is already in you"

 


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