Poetry Explorer- Classic Contemporary Poetry, MY MEADOW, by HAYDEN CARRUTH



Poetry Explorer

Classic and Contemporary Poetry

Rhyming Dictionary Search
MY MEADOW, by             Poet's Biography
First Line: Well, it's still the loveliest meadow in all vermont
Last Line: Maybe I have lived too long with the world
Subject(s): Environment; Fields; Nature; Plants; Environmental Protection; Ecology; Conservation; Pastures; Meadows; Leas; Planting; Planters


Well, it's still the loveliest meadow in all Vermont.
I believe that truly, yet for years have hardly

seen it, I think, having lived too long with it --
until I went to clean up the mess of firewood

left by the rural electric co-op when they cut
my clump of soft maples "threatening" their lines,

this morning, the last day of September. My maple leaves
were spilled in the grass, deep crimson. I worked

with axe and chainsaw, and when I was done I sat
on my rock that had housed my fox before the state

executed him on suspicion of rabies, and then
I looked at my meadow. I saw how it lies between

the little road and the little brook, how its borders
are birch and hemlock, popple and elm and ash,

white, green, red, brown, and gray, and how my grass
is composed in smooth serenity. Yet I have hankered

for six years after that meadow I saw in Texas
near Camp Wood because I discovered an armadillo

there and saw two long-tailed flycatchers
at their fantastic mating dance in the air.

Now I saw my meadow. And I called myself all kinds
of a blind Yankee fool -- not so much for hankering,

more for the quality of my looking that could make me
see in my mind what I could not see in my meadow.

However, I saw my serviceberry tree at the edge
of the grass where little pied asters, called Farewell-to-Summer,

made a hedge, my serviceberry still limping
from last winter's storms, and I went

and trimmed it. The small waxy pointed leaves
were delicate with the colors of coral and mallow

and the hesitating blush of the sky at dawn.
When I finished I stepped over my old fence

and sat by my brook on moss sodden from last night's
rain and got the seat of my britches wet.

I looked at my brook. It curled over my stones
that looked back at me again with the pathos

of their Paleozoic eyes. I thought of my
discontents. The brook, curled in its reflections

of ferns and asters and bright leaves, was whispering
something that made no sense. Then I closed my eyes

and heard my brook inside my head. It told me --
and I saw a distant inner light like the flash

of a waterdrop on a turning leaf -- it told me
maybe I have lived too long with the world.


Used with the permission of Copper Canyon Press, P.O. Box 271, Port Townsend, WA
98368-0271, www.cc.press.org




Other Poems of Interest...



Home: PoetryExplorer.net