Poetry Explorer- Classic Contemporary Poetry, BIRDS, by NESTA HIGGINSON SKRINE



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BIRDS, by             Poet's Biography
First Line: Sure maybe ye've heard the storm-thrush
Last Line: Ay, thon's the wee bird for me.
Alternate Author Name(s): O'neill, Moira
Subject(s): Robins


Sure maybe ye've heard the storm-thrush
Whistling bould in March,
Before there's a primrose peepin' out,
Or a wee red cone on the larch;
Whistlin' the sun to come out o' the cloud,
An' the wind to come over the sea,
But for all he can whistle so clear an' loud,
He's never the bird for me.

Sure maybe ye've seen the song-thrush
After an April rain
Slip from in-under the drippin' leaves,
Wishful to sing again;
An' low wi' love when he's near the nest,
An' loud from the top o' the tree,
But for all he can flutter the heart in your breast,
He's never the bird for me.

Sure maybe ye've heard the cushadoo
Callin' his mate in May,
When one sweet thought is the whole of his life,
An' he tells it the one sweet way.
But my heart is sore at the cushadoo
Filled with his own soft glee,
Over an' over his' me an' you!'
He's never the bird for me.

Sure maybe ye've heard the red-breast
Singin' his lone on a thorn,
Mindin' himself o' the dear days lost,
Brave wid his heart forlorn.
The time is in dark November,
An' no spring hopes has he:
'Remember,' he sings, 'remember!'
Ay, thon's the wee bird for me.





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