Poetry Explorer- Classic Contemporary Poetry, THE FROGS: THE RIVAL POETS, by ARISTOPHANES



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THE FROGS: THE RIVAL POETS, by             Poet's Biography
First Line: Fiercely, methinks, will he rage in his heart and loud will he bellow
Last Line: All the other's lungs have wrought.
Subject(s): Aeschylus (525-456 B.c.); Euripides (484-406 B.c.)


FIERCELY, methinks, will he rage in his heart and loud will he bellow,
When, as he glances aside, he espies this acid-tongued fellow
Whetting his tusks. Then in furious frenzy of soul
Round and round his eyes will roll.

O what a fight! How his phrases will charge, helm a glancing, plume waving,
Down on the pin-pricking ranks of his foe, the splinter-and-shaving
Troops that engage with poetic genius free,
Prancing phraseology!

Here 'neath a crest all his own, the mane on his shaggy neck curling,
Brows drawn down in a terrible frown, he is roaring and whirling
Riveted phrases, and baulk upon baulk follows fast,
Tossed on the titanic blast.

Here the smooth tongue uncoiling, the prattler, all blemishes tracing
Sets with a shake of their bridle the steeds of her jealousy racing,
Feasts on the phrases, and nibbles and nibbles to naught
All the other's lungs have wrought.





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