Poetry Explorer- Classic Contemporary Poetry, THESMOPHORIAZUSAE: EURIPIDES, by ARISTOPHANES



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Classic and Contemporary Poetry

THESMOPHORIAZUSAE: EURIPIDES, by             Poet's Biography
First Line: Dere now bemoany to de ouder air
Last Line: Cease.
Subject(s): Euripides (484-406 B.c.)


SCYTHIAN. MNESILOCHUS. EURIPIDES

(The Scythian brings Mnesilochus in, fastened to his plank, and sets it up
on the stage.)

SC.

Dere now bemoany to de ouder air.

MN.

O, I entreat you.

SC.

Nod endread me zu.

MN.

Slack it a little.

SC.

Dat is vat I does.

MN.

O mercy! mercy! O, you drive it tighter.

SC.

Dighder zu wiss him?

MN.

Miserable me!
Out on you villain.

SC.

Zilence, bad ole man.
I'se fetch de mad, an vatch zu comfibly.

MN.

These are the joys Euripides has brought me!

(Euripides makes a momentary appearance as Perseus.)

O Gods! O saviour Zeus! there's yet a hope.
Then he won't fail me! Out he flashed as Perseus.
I understand the signals, I'm to act
The fair Andromeda in chains. Ah, well,
Here are the chains, worse luck, wherewith to act her.
He'll come and succour me; he's in the wings.

(Euripides enters singing.)

EUR.

Now to peep, now to creep
Soft and slily through.
Maidens, pretty maidens,
Tell me what I am to do.
Tell me how to glide
By the Scythian Argus-eyed,
And to steal away my bride,
Tell me, tell me, tell me, tell me, tell me, tell me, tell,
Echo always lurking in the cavern and the dell. . . . (Exit.)
(Euripides speaks in the voice of Echo from behind the scenes.)

EUR.

O welcome, daughter; but the Gods destroy
Thy father Cepheus, who exposed thee thus!

MN.

O, who art thou that mournest for my woes?

EUR.

Echo, the vocal mocking-bird of song,
I, who, last year, in these same lists contended,
A faithful friend, beside Euripides.
And now, my child, for thou must play thy part,
Make dolorous wails.

MN.

And you wail afterwards?

EUR.

I'll see to that; only begin at once.

MN.

O Night most holy,
O'er dread Olympus, vast and far,
In thy dark car
Thou journeyest slowly
Through Ether ridged with many a star.

EUR.

With many a star.

MN.

Why on Andromeda ever must flow
Sorrow and woe?

EUR.

Sorrow and woe?

MN.

Heavy of fate.

EUR.

Heavy of fate.

MN.

Old woman, you'll kill me, I know, with your prate.

EUR.

Know with your prate.

MN.

Why, how tiresome you are: you are going too far.

EUR.

You are going too far.

MN.

Good friend, if you kindly will leave me in peace,
You'll do me a favour, O prithee, cease.

EUR.

Cease.





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