Poetry Explorer- Classic Contemporary Poetry, OBSERVATIONS IN THE ART OF ENGLISH POESY: 17. AN ELEGY, by THOMAS CAMPION



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OBSERVATIONS IN THE ART OF ENGLISH POESY: 17. AN ELEGY, by             Poet's Biography
First Line: Constant to none, but ever false to me
Last Line: If graced firm he stands, if not, eas'ly falls.
Subject(s): Unfaithfulness; Infidelity; Adultery; Inconstancy


Constant to none, but ever false to me,
Traitor still to love through thy faint desires,
Not hope of pity now nor vain redress
Turns my griefs to tears and renewed laments.
Too well thy empty vows and hollow thoughts
Witness both thy wrongs and remorseless heart.
Rue not my sorrow, but blush at my name,
Let thy bloody cheeks guilty thoughts betray.
My flames did truly burn, thine made a show,
As fires painted are which no heat retain,
Or as the glossy pyrop feigns to blaze,
But, touched, cold appears, and an earthy stone.
True colours deck thy cheeks, false foils thy breast,
Frailer than thy light beauty is thy mind.
None canst thou long refuse, nor long affect,
But turn'st fear with hopes, sorrow with delight,
Delaying, and deluding ev'ry way
Those whose eyes are once with thy beauty chained.
Thrice happy man that entering first thy love,
Can so guide the straight reins of his desires,
That both he can regard thee, and refrain:
If graced firm he stands, if not, eas'ly falls.





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