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BALLAD TO THE TUNE - 'BUT THAT NE'ER TROUBLES ME, BOYS', by                     Poet's Biography
First Line: And now a fig for th' lower house
Last Line: For spent is his last groat.
Subject(s): Great Britain - Parliament


I

AND now a fig for th' lower house;
The army I do set at nought:
I care not for them both a louse;
For spent is my last groat, boys,
For spent is my last groat.

II

Delinquent I'd not fear to be,
Though 'gainst the cause and Noll I'd fought;
Since England's now a state most free,
For who's not worth a groat, boys,
For who's not worth a groat.

III

I'll boldly talk, and do, as sure
By pursuivants ne'er to be sought;
'Tis a protection most secure,
Not to be worth a groat, boys,
Not to be worth a groat.

IV

I should be soon let loose again
By some mistake if I were caught;
For what can any hope to gain
From one not worth a groat, boys,
From one not worth a groat.

V

Nay, if some fool should me accuse,
And I unto the bar were brought;
The judges audience would refuse,
I being not worth a groat, boys,
I being not worth a groat.

VI

Or if some raw one should be bent
To make me in the air to vault,
The rest would cry, he's innocent,
He is not worth a groat, boys,
He is not worth a groat.

VII

Ye rich men, that so fear the state,
This privilege is to be bought;
Purchase it then at any rate,
Leave not yourselves a groat, boys,
Leave not yourselves a groat.

VIII

The parliament which now does sit
(That all may have it, as they ought)
Intends to make them for it fit,
And leave no man a groat, boys,
And leave no man a groat.

IX

Who writ this song, would little care
Although at th' end his name were wrought;
Committee-men their search may spare,
For spent is his last groat, boys,
For spent is his last groat.





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