Poetry Explorer- Classic Contemporary Poetry, TO MY FRIEND THOMAS RANDOLPH, ON HIS PLAY 'THE MUSE'S LOOKING-GLASS', by ASTON COCKAYNE



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TO MY FRIEND THOMAS RANDOLPH, ON HIS PLAY 'THE MUSE'S LOOKING-GLASS', by            
First Line: Some austere catos be, that do not stick
Last Line: Be a spectator of thy scenes again.
Alternate Author Name(s): Cokayne, Aston; Cokain, Aston
Subject(s): Randolph, Thomas (1605-1634)


Some austere Catos be, that do not stick
To term all poetry base that's dramatic:
These contradict themselves; for bid them tell,
How they like poesy, and they'll answer, well.
But as a stately fabric, raised by
The curious science of Geometry,
If one side of the machine perish, all
Participate with it a ruinous fall:
So they are enemies to Helicon
That vow they love all Muses, saving one.
Such supercilious humours I despise,
And like Thalia's harmless comedies.
Thy Entertainment had so good a fate,
That whosoe'er doth not admire thereat,
Discloseth his own ignorance; for no
True moralist would be suppos'd thy foe.
In the pure Thespian spring thou hast refin'd
Those harsh, rude precepts, which he did rehearse
In heavy prose, to run in nimble verse.
The Stagyrite will be slighted: who doth list
To read or see't becomes a moralist;
And if his eyes and ears are worth thine ore,
Learn more in two hours than two years before.
Thou hast my suffrage, friend, and I would fain
Be a spectator of thy scenes again.





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