Poetry Explorer- Classic Contemporary Poetry, ALEXANDER YPSILANTI, by KARL WILHELM MULLER



Poetry Explorer

Classic and Contemporary Poetry

Rhyming Dictionary Search
ALEXANDER YPSILANTI, by             Poet's Biography
First Line: Alexander ypsilanti sat in muncac's lofty tower
Last Line: From the window, and in moonlight spreads his pinions to the skies.
Alternate Author Name(s): Muller, Wilhelm
Subject(s): Hungary; Prisons & Prisoners; Ypsilantis, Alexandros (1792-1828); Ypsilanti, Alexander


ALEXANDER YPSILANTI sate in Muncacs' lofty tower,
And the rotten casement rattled in the wind that midnight hour;
Black-winged clouds, in long procession, hiding moon and
stars, swept by,
And the Greek prince whispered sadly: "Must I here, a captive, lie?"
On the distant south horizon still he gazes, half unmanned:
"Were I sleeping in thy dust, now, my beloved Fatherland!"
And he flung the window open, 't was a dreary scene to view;
Crows were swarming in the lowlands, round the cliff the eagle flew.
And again he murmured, sighing: "Comes there none good news to tell
From the country of my fathers?" And his heavy lashes fell, --
Was't with tears, or was't with slumber? And his head sank
on his hand; --
Lo! his face is growing brighter, -- dreams he of his Fatherland?
So he sate, and to the sleeper came a slender armed man,
Who, with glad and earnest visage, to the mourner thus began:
"Alexander Ypsilanti, cheer thy heart and lift thy head!
In the narrow rocky passage where my blood was freely shed,
Where the brave three hundred Spartans slumber in a common grave,
Greece to-day has met the oppressor, and her conquering banners wave.
This glad message to deliver was my spirit sent to thee:
Alexander Ypsilanti, Hellas' holy land is free!"
Then awoke the prince from slumber, and in ecstasy he cries:
"'T is Leonidas!" and glistening tears of joy bedewed his eyes.
Hark! above his head a rustling; and a kingly eagle flies
From the window, and in moonlight spreads his pinions to the skies.





Other Poems of Interest...



Home: PoetryExplorer.net