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Author: BLUMENTHAL, MICHAEL
Matches Found: 183


Blumenthal, Michael    Poet's Biography
183 poems available by this author


A MAN LOST BY A RIVER    Poem Text    
First Line: There is a voice inside the body
Last Line: For no good reason
Subject(s): Life Choices


A SUPERMARKET IN TEXAS    Poem Text    
First Line: They have mated an apricot / with a plum, they have cloned
Last Line: As god is my witness, or these witnesses my god
Subject(s): God; Markets; Miller, Arthur (1915-2005); Supermarkets


ABANDONING YOUR CAR IN A SNOWSTORM: ROSSLYN, VIRGINIA       
First Line: It is better %than leaving your wife or your nagging lover


ACCOUNTANT       
First Line: This being cambridge, he too
Last Line: That things may yet add up to add up


ADVICE TO MY STUDENTSL HOW TO WRITE A POEM    Poem Text    
First Line: Forget now, fofr a moment
Subject(s): Poetry & Poets


AND THE WAGES OF GOODNESS ARE NOT ASSURED    Poem Text    
First Line: That jacob stole his own brother's blessing
Subject(s): Concentration Camps


AND THE WAGES OF GOODNESS ARE NOT ASSURED (FOR AHARON APPLEF       
First Line: That jacob stole his own brother's blessing
Last Line: Keep singing like that into the light of this darkening world


ANGEL GABRIEL IS THE IMAGINATION       
First Line: He did not know if madness would survive into the night
Last Line: With never a hand in his deep pockets that came up empty


APPRENTICE       
First Line: His whole life had been movement
Last Line: And his true love came to him in the luminous dark
Subject(s): Apprentices


ARK (FOR PEGGY AND HOWARD NEMEROV)       
First Line: My son plays with the ark you gave him
Last Line: And multiply, who must replenish the earth


ART OF POETRY       
First Line: Perhaps all we are here to say is: house
Subject(s): Poetry And Poets


AT LUCY VINCENT BEACH, EASTER SUNDAY 1986       
First Line: In that long moment when you are trying to decide


ATELIER RHEINGOLD       
First Line: Here is the room in which
Last Line: To get, in his own way, home again


AUBADE       
First Line: A silvered light against my hand
Last Line: And lovlier than true


BACK FROM THE WORD PROCESSING COURSE, I SAY TO MY OLD TYPEWRITER    Poem Text    
First Line: Old friend, you
Subject(s): Typewriters


BACK FROM WORD-PROCESSING COURSE, I SAY TO MY OLD TYPEWRITER       
First Line: Old friend, you
Last Line: Vibrate those aging hips again %beneath these trembling hands
Subject(s): Computers; Typewriters


BE KIND    Poem Text    
First Line: Not merely because henry james said
Subject(s): Kindness


BEAR       
First Line: Last night I dreamt I was a bear
Last Line: And put my bear hair everywhere


BECAUSE MARRIAGE IS NOT FOR ROMANTICS       
First Line: We should meet in some central european city
Last Line: Of romance and desire and impossible love


BEFORE A STORM, IN SEPTEMBER       
First Line: Air inhales water and light so hard
Last Line: The air surrendering its secret, and we %wet with the mere thought of it


BITTER TRUTH       
First Line: The truth is a bitter truth--
Last Line: I too must end with I do not know: the sky, %the water on the lake, and the truth below


BLEIBTREUSTRASSE       
First Line: I have sat on many streets
Last Line: I speak your name


BLUE       
First Line: Inside the hollowness that is bone
Last Line: That says I love you, and when the bones %open out into their pelvic dust, the blue %that is always


BLUEBIRD       
First Line: Perhaps it was these signs of early spring
Last Line: Into the chilly, april night, still flame for you: %the spring that comes in earnest, even now


BRAHMS       
First Line: It must be that my early friendship with defeat
Last Line: Brahms will show you how loyal the notes are


BUYING BASEBALL CARDS AT FORTY-TWO (FOR MARILYN LEVINE)       
First Line: It is because I wanted to see again their faces
Last Line: As I, heading home to my son, have gone the way of all sons


CAMBRIDGE       
First Line: Your neighbor has written a book


CHEERS    Poem Text    
First Line: Imagine drinking to the health
Subject(s): Health; Toasts


CHEERS       
First Line: Imagine drinking to the health
Last Line: Hallowed the names of your loved ones, in sickness and in health


CHERRIES       
First Line: After auschwitz, it's been said, it's no longer possible
Last Line: And birkenau and dachau, relishing the taste of cherries %inmy mouth, refusing to believe they are t
Subject(s): Nature


CHRISTMAS ECLOGUE: WASHINGTON, D.C.       
First Line: The homeless have all gone home
Last Line: That is not homeless pauses, looks around, %gives thanks, remains


CIVIC LEADERS       
First Line: So much virtue in a single room!
Last Line: Reaches out %in search of a knee


CONNOISSEUR OF STARTS       
First Line: He loved the quick and hot commencements best
Last Line: In fits and starts: the connoisseur of endings


COUVADE       
First Line: When your wife uttered your son
Last Line: Will speak his name into the tight tercet %of their togetherness. And his son %will call him father,


CURE       
First Line: Not just my family, dear god
Last Line: This longing to stop things from dividing, %I write this poem


DAYENU       
First Line: Had he rescued the nightingales from the floods
Last Line: Oh, it would have been enough, lord %dayenu, dayenu. %and for years


DAYS WE WOULD RATHER KNOW    Poem Text    
First Line: There are days we would rather know


DAYS WE WOULD RATHER KNOW       
First Line: There are days we would rather know
Last Line: Of the ginkgo, something to keep for a better tomorrow: %days we would rather know that never come


DEEP ECOLOGY       
First Line: My wife stays home and stares at the amaryllis
Last Line: The deep echo of that flower's bloom %for the empty sound of two hands clapping?
Subject(s): Nature


DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A CHILD AND A POEM       
First Line: If you are terrified of your own death
Last Line: You may want to write a poem


DISAPPOINTMENTS OF CHILDHOOD       
First Line: Imagine, now, an affection the same size
Last Line: Their small bones %growing constantly inward %from your spreading arms


DOWN DIGNIFIED       
First Line: He thought he would merely continue
Last Line: Of everything beyond its own demise


DRINKS AND KISSES       
First Line: My mouth puddles with bourbon and the taste
Last Line: I pucker forth to kiss you among the dying trees


DUNG BEETLES       
First Line: They accept whatever excrement
Last Line: Thanking the immaculate gods %for the divine orderliness %ofthis shit-ridden world


DUSK: MALLARDS ON THE CHARLES RIVER       
First Line: So much like an old couple


EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION    Poem Text    
First Line: Because I want to educate him early
Last Line: Language to language, house to house
Subject(s): Children; Education; Childhood


EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION       
First Line: Because I want to educate him early
Last Line: Hello good-bye hello good-bye hello good-bye
Subject(s): Children; Education


EARTH WAS TEPID AND THE MOON WAS DARK       
Last Line: And then it was over, the day. And again the moon


ELEGY FOR MY MOTHER: THE DAYS (BETTY BLUMENTHAL)       
First Line: It has been twenty-five years, now
Last Line: Of death, the kiss all life comes from


ELEPHANTS DYING       
First Line: It is as if they are ashamed
Last Line: And how they beat the earth to sleep %with their huge feet, their tails, %their beautiful, dead bone


EMILIO ROMA IS DEAD (IN MEMORIAM, EMILIO ROMA III)       
First Line: Yours were the sexy subjects
Last Line: In the gaze of our foremost philosopher, %that last perceiver


EMILIO ROMER IS DEAD    Poem Text    
First Line: Yours were the sexy subjects
Last Line: In the gaze of our foremost philosopher, / that last perceiver
Subject(s): Death


EPITHALAMIUM: THE SINGLE LIGHT       
First Line: Just as coitus means, really, to travel together
Last Line: Was meant to be, this utterance that love alone makes true, %its single light still burning in your


FALLING ASLEEP AT THE EROTIC MOZI       
First Line: Because I want to watch them do what I would like to do
Last Line: I hunger. I fidget. I dream. I fall asleep


FATHER       
First Line: I hold a candle to your face
Last Line: Be water, father, %be blood


FIRST SNOW: CAMBRIDGE, MASS    Poem Text    
First Line: The trees cough up a plentitude of starlings
Subject(s): Snow


FIRST SNOW: CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS       
First Line: The trees cough up a plenitude of starlings
Last Line: Or snow could, or the starlings in earnest


FISH FUCKING       
First Line: This is not a poem about sex, or even
Last Line: Happily ever after, chasing each other, lustful %as stars through the constantly breaking water


FIVE ANSWERS TO SACVAN BERCOVITCH       
First Line: In a drizzle, maybe, in the sun
Last Line: When some learned singing, others how to pray


FLIRTATION       
First Line: I am tired of looking at you through this glass
Last Line: In satin sheets, sipping imported brandy: %whispering each other's name to the impossible windows


FOR H., DEAD IN A CAR AT THIRTY-EIGHT    Poem Text    
First Line: Today I blessed every little thing in the world
Subject(s): Automobile Accidents; Mortality


FOR H., DEAD IN A CAR AT THIRTY-EIGHT       
First Line: Today I blessed every little thing in the world
Last Line: Calling not me that must have called it to you


FORCES       
First Line: Who, having lived more than a moment
Last Line: Chooses us over and over until we're chosen for real


FREUDIAN SLIP       
First Line: Though she coaxes the embroidered silk
Last Line: And when she says I love you, %she means watch your step, %the rest of your life


GARDEN       
First Line: It is an old store, older
Last Line: In the new garden from which all eat, %and in which no one wants to plant


GARMENTS       
First Line: Now the sun's yellow smock is falling again


GEOLOGIST (GRAND CANYON, MAY 1988)       
First Line: He had made a life of stone
Last Line: Pyrite for true gold. He was not fool enough %ever to take gneiss for granite
Subject(s): Nature


GERMANS       
First Line: Punctual, decent, historically regal
Last Line: And what are they reading? The tagesspiegel


GOD LOVES YOU, AND SO DO I    Poem Text    
First Line: Because it is what he says always, to anyone
Subject(s): Fathers & Sons


GOD LOVES YOU, AND SO DO I       
First Line: Because it is what he says always, to anyone


GROWING OLD IN WEST VIRGINIA       
First Line: Like some ripe, old couple
Last Line: Morning came, %found us in a tapestry of light


HALF FULL       
First Line: Ahead the taillights of cars like raccoon's eyes
Last Line: The full moon rising like love in the rearview mirror


HAPPIEST DAY OF YOUR LIFE (FOR D.)       
First Line: You were in chicago. It was september
Last Line: The pages of newsprint in your hand, turning


HAPPY POEM       
First Line: This is a poem against false piety and sadness
Last Line: This is my poem. And it is your poem. %and it is not sorry about anything... %not even this


HEART OF QUANG DUC       
First Line: When quang duc poured gasoline all over his body
Last Line: Forever, or for very long


HEARTS OF MEN       
First Line: Swing %like pendulums
Last Line: For the shaken trill %of their weeping-- %their cleft, broken hearts?


I AM SICK OF THE RICH       
First Line: I am sick of the rich, the way
Last Line: Iceberg, complaining to no one in particular %of the darkness, the seaweed, the incredible poverty


I HAVE LIVED THIS WAY FOR YEARS AND DO NOT WISH TO CHANGE    Poem Text    
First Line: I hope you'll forgive the black paint
Last Line: The chocolate-covered cotton balls
Subject(s): Writing & Writers; Conduct Of Life


I HAVE LIVED THIS WAY FOR YEARS AND DO NOT WISH TO CHANGE       
First Line: I hope you'll forgive the black paint
Last Line: Help yourself to the jellyfish, the goose down, %the chocolate-covered cotton balls
Subject(s): Writing And Writers


I THINK CONSTANTLY OF THOSE WHO WERE TRULY GREAT    Poem Text    
First Line: And. To be pertfectly honest, it bums me out
Subject(s): Humility


I THINK CONSTANTLY OF THOSE WHO WERE TRULY GREAT       
First Line: And, to be perfectly honest, it burns me out
Last Line: My own small deeds into their magnificent arms


ICARUS DESCENDED       
First Line: I was a bird once, and I flew
Last Line: Of cold metal where your wings once were


IN A CEMETERY IN KEENE, NEW HAMPSHIRE       
First Line: Bolander, blixen, wellington, and crumb
Last Line: Of such thoughts to be thought, books to be read %among the mute cerebrations of the dead


IN A HELICOPTER OVER PARACHUTE, COLORADO       
First Line: I am not sure what the gods would have thought of this
Last Line: The greatest kindness is not reverence, and whether men %canlong continue to move mountains, or moun


IN ASSISI       
First Line: This morning, in assisi, I woke
Last Line: Singing in the stream, this all I know of perfect joy, %and all the white doves kissing in its name


INVENTORS       
First Line: Imagine being the first to say: surveillance'


IT HAPPENS       
First Line: A man wakes. A woman wakes


JULIEK'S VIOLIN    Poem Text    
First Line: In the dank halls of buchenwald
Last Line: Naked and questioning
Subject(s): Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945); Jews; Shoah; Judaism


JULIEK'S VIOLIN       
First Line: In the dank halls of buchenwald
Last Line: Juliek plays on. %and the children, %as if in answer, %burn
Subject(s): Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945); Jews


JUNGIANS & FREUDIANS AT THE JOSEPH CAMPBELL LECTURE       
First Line: The jungians are all wearing purple
Last Line: Over jungian wine and freudian doughnuts %in the pale, white room


LAST SUPPER       
First Line: None of us is christ, really
Last Line: Descends over three men fingering the truth %of themselves in the solitary darkness: %the wax of the


LEAP CHILD       
First Line: Born on a day which comes again
Last Line: To have been born at all, though the stuttering %years sometimes skip over his good name %without ev


LEARNING BY DLING       
First Line: And now the day is mine and it is sweet
Last Line: Just claim your loss tonight. And don't repeat


LETTERS FLOATING AROUND ELLIS ISLAND       
First Line: Today I was thinking about the millions of letters
Last Line: The ever-rising berg, the revivifying thal


LIFE GOES ON    Poem Text    
First Line: Over the dulling years you write
Subject(s): Love; Language; Words; Vocabulary


LIGHT, AT THIRTY-TWO       
First Line: It is the first thing god speaks of
Last Line: All things lovely there. As that first poet wrote, %in his first book of poems: let there be light %


LITRAJURE OF EVERYDAY LIFE       
First Line: Nothing derivative here
Last Line: And unmediated from within the sweet %potpourri of its ribbed compendium: %nowhere indexed, nowhere


LOOKING FOR WILDFLOWERS IN BERNHEIM FOREST       
First Line: The dogtooth violet, the chickweed
Last Line: Through the woods, calling out %such words as only love can name


LOSS       
First Line: Something falls from you, life
Last Line: Loss persuades me it is real, %irrevocable, %unsure of its own resurrection. %as we are, david, as w


LUKACS FURDO: DECEMBER 31. 1995       
First Line: Why should I not be among them
Last Line: To heal ourselves before we are healed


MAN LOST BY A RIVER       
First Line: There is a voice inside the body
Last Line: For having strayed %from the path of his routine, %for no good reason
Subject(s): Men


MAN WHO NEEDED NO ONE       
First Line: He wanted to need no one, not
Last Line: Asking for a light to see by, a match %to retrieve his heart with from the widening dark


MATINEE       
First Line: It could almost be an affair, this slinking off
Last Line: If desire only wanted what desire had


MEDITATION ON POLITICS AT THE QUABBIN RESERVOIR (FOR JOSEPH       
First Line: All day there has been no peace
Last Line: Where we meet to become this: possessors %of a merely partial purity, a purely human one
Subject(s): Nature


MELANCHOLY       
First Line: Though the flutist was beautiful
Last Line: It is almost night %when the joys of this life %finally find you again, %looking for tulips beneath


MUSHROOM HUNTING IN LATE AUGUST, PETERBOROUGH, N.H.       
First Line: The drosophila wing of the morning moon
Last Line: I stumble out into the sunlight. %I pucker my lips at the morning moon. %and I eat
Subject(s): Mushrooms; New Hampshire


MUSIC OF WHATEVER       
First Line: The way goethe counted out hexameters
Last Line: Your voice in the unchilled wind making music %of even this even now even here


NEVER TO HAVE LOVED A CHILD    Poem Text    
Subject(s): Love


NEVER TO HAVE LOVED A CHILD       
Last Line: And what has become of them now


NIGHT BASEBALL       
First Line: At night, when I go out to the field
Last Line: That boy still rising from his theft to find the light


NIGHT THE DANCING DIED (APRIL 19, 1968)       
First Line: The night martin luther king was shot
Last Line: Went burning in the chilly april air


NO MORE KISSING - AIDS EVERYWHERE    Poem Text    
First Line: He says it to the young couple
Last Line: Kissing their way towards heaven until they die
Subject(s): Aids (disease); Sickness; Illness


NO MORE KISSING - AIDS EVERYWHERE       
First Line: He says it to the young couple
Last Line: Kissing their way towards heaven till they die
Subject(s): Aids (disease); Sickness


OCTOBER SESTINA: THE SHADOWS       
First Line: The maple that was amber this time
Last Line: Songing the quiet of this restless time, as the dead %spreadtheir fingers beneath the widening shado


OLD PAINTER AT THE VIOLIN       
First Line: Because it is his destiny
Last Line: Because, in the cacophony of this life, %the one voice he always heard clearly %was his own


ON THE EDGE AT SANTORINI       
First Line: You understand now %what it means
Last Line: Watch the rest of your life %fall like rain to the hungry sea


OPUS POSTHUMOUS    Poem Text    
First Line: I love the way the dead keep writing to us
Last Line: Place beyond desire and meanness, beyond dust
Subject(s): Death; Writing & Writers; Dead, The


OPUS POSTHUMOUS       
First Line: I love the way the dead keep writing to us
Last Line: A place beyond desire and meanness, beyond dust
Subject(s): Death; Writing And Writers


ORDINARY HEARTBREAKS    Poem Text    
First Line: The day dawns, and what do you do with your one body?


ORDINARY HEARTBREAKS       
First Line: The day dawns, and what to do with your one body?
Last Line: You feel a revolution coming, %your own four walls trembling


ORDINARY/EXTRAORDINARY       
First Line: Courage and sleep, lindsay said
Last Line: Are the extraordinary flowers %we carry, speechlessly, %intoour ordinary rooms


OVER OHIO       
First Line: You can say what you want about the evils of technology
Last Line: An andean condor sailing over ohio, above the factories, %above the dust and the highways and the mi


PACT       
First Line: It's an old truth, that always lurks behind the curtain
Last Line: Of that old truth, the one there waiting by the curtain


PHOTOGRAPH OF GIACOMETTI       
First Line: The man's life is his work
Last Line: A long shadow crossing the glazed street %to reclaim his body, before the rain does


PLEASURES OF OLD AGE       
First Line: When my grandmother lisette turned ninety-nine
Last Line: How she would gladly tremble for them again, %even now


POEM BY SOMEONE ELSE       
First Line: This is not my poem
Last Line: It is not my poem, %but only my brother's-- %who lives in another country


POEM FOR MY FATHER AT EIGHTY-FIVE AFTER CROSS-COUNTY SKIING       
First Line: It is as the good book says: he whom the gods love
Last Line: Turning my face toward the sun, correcting the world


POEM, AGAINST HESITATION       
First Line: Her tilted chin mimics the rise
Last Line: Oh, kiss her already, you fool, %the darkness surrounds us


POET, MARRIED       
First Line: He missed his loneliness
Last Line: Whatever it was he had left


PRAISE       
First Line: I roll from the bed mornings
Last Line: All I will remember %are last night's stars... %what they disturb, %and what they rectify


PRAYER FOR MY SON (FOR NOAH)       
First Line: Little bird, %small sacred flake
Last Line: But through passionate eyes


PUER AETERNUS       
First Line: The wax wings of icarus haunt you
Last Line: From the shadows: the kind voice of daedalus %whispers its warning as you head for the sun


PUZZLE       
First Line: In the old family photograph, they are all
Last Line: To speak your name quietly into their strange completeness


REFINISHING THE TABLE       
First Line: You still remember the nick your sister made
Last Line: Calling your sister, the dead trees and the %mute children of another life back to the table


RISK       
First Line: There are lives so safe you could weep for them
Last Line: All the risk I would ever need


SAMIZDAT'S MUSE       
First Line: He had been writing ambiguous love poems
Last Line: Not entirely of their own choosing


SAXOPHONE       
First Line: Just as the mind gasps and dies a little at orgasm
Last Line: Trembling the darkness, finding its way to you


SAY (FOR WENDY PARSONS)       
First Line: Say you have always wanted to be someone
Last Line: Gets in their way, in whatever guise r


SERIAL MONOGAMY       
First Line: For seven years I have been here loving your teeth
Last Line: Desire runs hot as surprise over your eyelids, toes, %your lovely new body


SNOWSTORM       
First Line: White's the crazed color of the day
Last Line: Whiteness of our lives before moving on once again %into the real and quotidian darkness of the next


SOME NIGHTS AT THIRTY       
First Line: Some nights you are the dirty girl from iowa
Last Line: Shifting me to first gear and pedaling like crazy, %in our old bed of fantasy and remarkable absence


SQUID       
First Line: So this is love
Last Line: And all nausea reduces, finally, to a hunger %for what is naked and approachable, %tangible and deli


STAMPS       
First Line: They are the world's licked emissaries


STONES       
First Line: We live in dread of something
Last Line: Not even the fish %will pause to tell apart


SUPERMARKET IN TEXAS       
First Line: They have mated an apricot %with a plum, they have cloned
Last Line: As god is my witness, or these witnesses my god
Subject(s): God; Markets; Miller, Arthur (b. 1915)


SWITCH-HITTERS    Poem Text    
First Line: How many home runs / mickey mantle hit
Last Line: Up and over the fence, a home run
Subject(s): Physical Disabilities; Handicapped; Handicaps; Physically Challenged; Cripples


SWITCH-HITTERS       
First Line: How many home runs %mickey mantle hit
Last Line: And up over the fence, a home run
Subject(s): Physical Disabilities


THE ACCOUNTANT    Poem Text    
First Line: This being cambridge, he too
Subject(s): Accountants & Accounting


THE CONNOISSEUR OF STARTS    Poem Text    
First Line: He loved the quick and hot commencements best


THE DISAPPOINTMENTS OF CHILDHOOD    Poem Text    
First Line: Imagine now, an affection the same size
Subject(s): Childhood Memories


THE FLIRTATION    Poem Text    
First Line: I am tired of looking at you through this glass
Subject(s): Desire


THE FORCES    Poem Text    
First Line: Who, having lived more than a moment


THE GEOLOGIST (GRAND CANYON, MAY 1988)    Poem Text    
First Line: He had made a life of stone
Last Line: Ever to take gneiss for granite
Subject(s): Nature


THE NEW YORKER POEM    Poem Text    
First Line: It is best to mention a painter
Last Line: Delightfully difficult, bilingual
Subject(s): New Yorker, The (periodical); Paintings & Painters; Poetry & Poets


THE PLEASURES OF OLD AGE    Poem Text    
First Line: When my grandmother lisette turned ninety-nine
Subject(s): Old Age; Romance; Grandparents; Grandmothers; Grandfathers; Great Grandfathers; Great Grandmothers


THE YOUNG    Poem Text    
First Line: So here they are
Last Line: Telling them how it is
Subject(s): Youth


THIS IS IT       
First Line: Ah, john, the world is cold
Last Line: On the day of your birth. Happy birthday. %this is it


TIP OF THE ICEBERG       


TODAY I AM ENVYING THE GLORIOUS MEXICANS       
Last Line: Mexicans beside the wild chrysanthemums--%besude the rose, the sangria and the happy earth


TONGUES    Poem Text    
First Line: I turn to my cold blood
Last Line: In the cold, brackish language of water, / and of salt
Subject(s): Language


TONGUES       
First Line: I turn to my cold blood
Last Line: In the cold, brackish language of water, %and of salt


TWICE-BORN MATCHES       
First Line: I sit by the water, a box
Last Line: I reach into my pocket for my matches, %hoping to find one %that will burn a second time


UNITED JEWISH APPEAL    Poem Text    
First Line: My grandmother was eighty-nine and blind
Subject(s): Old Age; Grandparents; Childhood Memories; Grandmothers; Grandfathers; Great Grandfathers; Great Grandmothers


UNITED JEWISH APPEAL       
First Line: My grandmother was eighty-nine and blind
Last Line: Of the united jewish appeal


WALK ON A SUMMER'S NIGHT       
First Line: Not to go out in melancholy, or in rage
Last Line: Before you call them your own


WASHINGTON HEIGHTS    Poem Text    
First Line: Even the bad bews came slowly and was afraid
Last Line: For the ice truck, buried the dead, called it home
Subject(s): Washington Heights, New York City; Childhood Memories


WASHINGTON HEIGHTS, 1959       
First Line: Even the bad news came slowly and was afraid
Last Line: As long as the mail kept coming, we smiled, waited %for the ice truck, buried the dead, called it ho


WASP IN THE STUDY       
First Line: It knows the window's the way out


WATCHING LA BOHEME WITH MY FATHER       
First Line: I used to wonder why these simple deaths
Last Line: For we have learned to sing together rather well-- %before the lights went out, before the curtains


WAVING GOOD-BYE TO MY FATHER       
First Line: My father, folding toward the earth again, plays
Last Line: To live, dear father, is to forgive. %and I forgive


WEEDING       
First Line: Some say it's woman's work, this bending
Last Line: In any place the gods might pause to occupy, %as they do here and now, amen


WHAT A TIME!    Poem Text    
First Line: To dance, at a dark party, to old tunes
Subject(s): Parties


WHAT A TIME!       
First Line: To dance, at a dark party, to old tunes


WHAT I BELIEVE       
First Line: I believe there is no justice
Last Line: So as not to disturb anyone, %so as not to interfere %with what we believe in


WHAT SURVIVES       
First Line: Over the dulling years
Last Line: About love. %about language. %about the light on the table


WHO WILL LIVE IN OUR HOUSES WHEN WE DIE?       
First Line: The silent hush, the rusted hinges
Last Line: And how can the unborn sing for us %when we return to the earth?


WINTER LIGHT       
First Line: In the flat, clean light of winter
Last Line: The coldness of stone and hover above everything, %in the stark, immaculate light of winter


WISHES THAT COULD LAST A LIFETIME       
First Line: Now it is once again the cold morning
Last Line: It lasts and lasts. It goes on, %ephemeral as breath, wishful as all thinking. %enough to last an en


WISHFUL THINKING       
First Line: I like to think that ours will be more than just another story
Last Line: And the flames of longing: a bird rising over the ashes, a dream


WOMAN INSIDE       
First Line: There is a woman %inside me
Last Line: She is the one %who wakes %with her arms around me %when I wake %alone


YIN AND YANG       
First Line: My love is simple
Last Line: Singing: moon, moon, stars, stars


YOUNG       
First Line: So here they are
Last Line: Telling them how it is
Subject(s): Youth


YOUNG BIRDS CRYING LATE AT NIGHT       
First Line: At night you can hear them
Last Line: Of their impotent wings as the stars %ember and rise up %to light this palpitating world