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Classic and Contemporary Poetry: Explained

DEJECTION, by             Poet Analysis     Poet's Biography

Robert Seymour Bridges' "Dejection" is a poem that reflects on the emotional and spiritual pain of feeling lost and disconnected from the world. The poem was first published in Bridges' collection of poems, "The Growth of Love" in 1898. 

The poem "Dejection" explores the emotional and spiritual pain of feeling disconnected from the world, with the speaker describing a sense of isolation and disconnection from both nature and other human beings. The poem begins with a description of the speaker's emotional and spiritual state, with the speaker describing feeling "dead" and disconnected from the world. However, the poem's tone shifts as the speaker reflects on the possibility of finding connection and meaning in the world.

Throughout the poem, Bridges employs a range of poetic elements to convey the emotional pain and longing of disconnection. The use of vivid imagery, including the "gloomy skies" and the "dreary waste", creates a vivid picture of the emotional landscape of disconnection. The use of repetition, such as the repeated phrase "dead to the world", emphasizes the sense of isolation and disconnection.

In addition to its focus on the pain of disconnection, the poem can be read as a commentary on the human experience of longing for connection and meaning. The poem suggests that even in times of disconnection and despair, it is possible to find meaning and purpose in the world.

In conclusion, "Dejection" is a powerful and evocative poem that reflects on the pain of feeling disconnected from the world. Bridges' use of poetic elements, such as vivid imagery and repetition, creates a vivid and emotional picture of the emotional landscape of disconnection. The poem's themes of longing, connection, and the search for meaning and purpose in difficult times, make it a timeless reflection on the human experience of loss and despair.


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