Poetry Explorer- Classic Contemporary Poetry, POOR TARTAR; A HUNGARIAN LEGEND, by JOHN GODFREY SAXE



Poetry Explorer

Classic and Contemporary Poetry

Rhyming Dictionary Search
POOR TARTAR; A HUNGARIAN LEGEND, by             Poet's Biography
First Line: There's trouble in hungary, now, alas!
Last Line: "god pity the tartar!"" said he."
Subject(s): Legends, Hungarian; Tatars; Tartars


I.

THERE's trouble in Hungary, now, alas!
There's trouble on every hand!
For that terrible man,
The Tartar Khan,
Is ravaging over the land!

II.

He is riding forth with his ugly men,
To rob and ravish and slay;
For deeds like those,
You may well suppose,
Are quite in the Tartar-way.

III.

And now he comes, that terrible chief,
To a mansion grand and old;
And he peers about
Within and without,
And what do his eyes behold?

IV.

A thousand cattle in fold and field,
And sheep all over the plain;
And noble steeds
Of rarest breeds,
And beautiful crops of grain.

V.

But finer still is the hoarded wealth
That his ravished eyes behold;
In silver plate
Of wondrous weight,
And jewels of pearl and gold!

VI.

A nobleman owns this fine estate;
And when the robber he sees,
'T is not very queer
He quakes with fear,
And trembles a bit in the knees.

VII.

He quakes in fear of his precious life,
And, scarce suppressing a groan,
"Good Tartar," says he,
"Whatever you see
Be pleased to reckon your own!"

VIII.

The Khan looked round in a leisurely way
As one who is puzzled to choose;
When, cocking his ear,
He chanced to hear
The creak of feminine shoes.

IX.

The Tartar smiled a villainous smile,
When, like a lily in bloom,
A lady fair
With golden hair
Came gliding into the room.

X.

The robber stared with amorous eyes;
Was ever so winning a face?
And long he gazed
As one amazed
To see such beauty and grace.

XI.

A moment more, and the lawless man
Had seized his struggling prey,
Without remorse,
And taking horse
He bore the lady away.

XII.

"Now Heaven be praised!" the noble man cried,
"For many a mercy to me!
I bow me still
Unto his will, --
God pity the Tartar!" said he.





Other Poems of Interest...



Home: PoetryExplorer.net