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Author: HACKER, MARILYN
Matches Found: 191


Hacker, Marilyn    Poet's Biography
191 poems available by this author


1974       
First Line: I'm pregnant,' I wrote to her in delight
Subject(s): Homosexuality


26-DEC       
First Line: Across the street, the widow weighs the storm
Last Line: Her grandmother's chandelier tinkles behind %her, seasick, swaying like a pendulum


A CHAPLET FOR JUDITH LANDRY    Poem Text    
First Line: Dear judith: in sincerest gratitude
Subject(s): Friendship; Hospitality


A MAN WITH SONS    Poem Text    
First Line: You come back with a heaped-shopping basket
Subject(s): Fathers & Sons


ABSENT FRIEND       
First Line: Perched on a high stool, the auburn sybil
Last Line: There. Or another where, but I am wrong


AFTER ASSUMPTION       
First Line: Yesterday, closed shops
Last Line: North over the coastal hills; %fog shrouds the mountains


AGAIN, THE RIVER       
First Line: Early summer in what I hope is 'midlife'
Last Line: Toward other moorings


AGAINST ELEGIES    Poem Text     Recitation by Author
First Line: James has cancer. Catherine has cancer
Subject(s): Aids (disease); Sickness; Illness


AGAINST ELEGIES       
First Line: James has cancer. Catherine has cancer
Last Line: And I, in no one's stories, as we are
Subject(s): Aids (disease); Sickness


AGAINST SILENCE       
First Line: Because you are %my only daughter's only grandmother
Last Line: What it will be, or even what it was


ALBA NEAR IMPRUNETA       
First Line: They wake to january light
Last Line: Their half-empty %pint of good brandy


ALMOST AUBADE       
First Line: The little hours: two lovers herd upstairs
Last Line: Lie in my arms until the kids get up
Subject(s): Family Life


ALTO SOLO       
First Line: Dear one, it's a while since you turned the lights out
Last Line: There the river goes with its bundled cargo: %unanswered letters


AN ALEXANDRITE PENDANT FOR MY MOTHER    Poem Text    
First Line: I am not in my country, and my home


ANYONE       
First Line: There was never a prelapsarian childhood
Last Line: There was nothing to interest historians in her letters


APRIL INTERVAL       
First Line: Wherever I surface I reinvent
Last Line: As long as I'm still sound, and it's still sunny


APRIL INTERVAL I    Poem Text    
First Line: Wherever I surface I reinvent


APRIL INTERVAL III    Poem Text    
First Line: Around my shelves of books and bibclots


APRIL INTERVAL IV    Poem Text    
First Line: There was no spring in saratoga springs
Subject(s): Rain


AT NOON, AN ORDERLY WHEELED ME UPSTAIRS       
First Line: At noon, an orderly wheeled me upstairs
Last Line: The hand that held the cup next was my daughter's.


AUBADE II       
First Line: Sometimes, when you're asleep, I want to do
Last Line: You wake up, and you bring it down like rain


AUGUST JOURNAL       
First Line: How does it feel, in this ephemeral flesh
Last Line: Eight different sets of windows opposite


BALLAD OF LADIES LOST AND FOUND    Poem Text    
First Line: Where are the women who, entre deux guerres
Subject(s): African Americans - Women; Anthony, Susan Brownell (1820-1906); Blues (music); Bonheur, Rosa (1822-1899); Colette, Sidonie Gabrielle (1873-1954); De La Cruz, Juana Ines (1648-1695); Dickinson, Emily (1830-1886); Doolittle, Hilda (1886-1961); Eleanor Of A


BALLAD OF LADIES LOST AND FOUND       
First Line: Where are the women who, entre deux guerres
Last Line: And truncated a woman's chronicle, %and plain old margaret fuller died as well
Subject(s): African Americans - Women; Anthony, Susan Brownell (1820-1906); Blues (music); Bonheur, Rosa (1822-1899); Colette, Sidonie Gabrielle (1873-1954); De La Cruz, Juana Ines (1648-1695); Dickinson, Emily (1830-1886); Doolittle, Hilda (1886-1961); Eleanor Of A


BLACK BOAT    Poem Text     Recitation by Author
First Line: If you were there when I woke


BROCELIANDE       
First Line: Yes, there is a vault in the ruined castle
Last Line: Here, beneath viridian skies, a window glistens at midnight


BURNHAM BEECHES    Poem Text    
First Line: At two am, chain-smoking in your car
Subject(s): Relationships


CANCER WINTER    Poem Text    
First Line: Syllables shaped around the darkening day's
Variant Title(s): "syllables Shaped Around The Darkening Day's"";
Subject(s): Cancer (disease)


CANCER WINTER       
First Line: Syllables shaped around the darkening day's
Last Line: I woke up, still alive. Does that mean 'cured'?
Variant Title(s): Syllables Shaped Around The Darkening Day'
Subject(s): Cancer (disease)


CANZONE    Poem Text    
First Line: Consider the three functions of the tongue
Subject(s): Pleasure; Taste (sense)


CANZONE       
First Line: Consider the three functions of the tongue
Last Line: Whoever wants to give %only one meaning to that, has untutored taste
Subject(s): Pleasure; Taste (sense)


CELLES       
First Line: We liked its name: those ones, feminine plural
Last Line: Like us, feminine, plural, transient


CHANSON DE L'ENFANT PRODIGUE    Poem Text    
First Line: The child of wonder looks in bed
Subject(s): Children; Childhood


CHANSON DE LA MAL AIMEE       
First Line: December fog condensed above the seine
Last Line: At midnight was a privilege of mine %across that river or another one


CHILIASTIC SAPPHICS       
First Line: Sunday afternoon at the end of summer
Last Line: Cried in french and arabic at the market %early this morning


CLEIS        Recitation by Author
Subject(s): Daughters


CODA    Poem Text    
First Line: Maybe it was jet lag, maybe not,
Subject(s): Divorce; Conduct Of Life


CODA, SELS.       
First Line: Did you love well what very soon you left?
Last Line: Of honey from the seasons of your tongue
Variant Title(s): Did You Love Well What Very Soon You Left


CONVERATION IN THE PARK       
First Line: Do people look at me and know I'm gay?'


CORONA       
First Line: You're flying back, weighed with half


COUNTRY & WESTERN       
First Line: She will never know I cried for her
Last Line: The beer...I doused the light. I cried for her


COUNTRY & WESTERN 2       
First Line: It looks like we are the last unmarried
Last Line: Smoke while we watch the stars, and talk about food


CREPUSCULE WITH MURIEL    Poem Text     Recitation by Author
First Line: Instead of a cup of tea, instead of a milk-
Subject(s): Rukeyser, Muriel (1913-1980); Strokes (illness)


CREPUSCULE WITH MURIEL       
First Line: Instead of a cup of tea, instead of a milk
Last Line: Rouged by the fluvial light of six o'clock


CULTURAL EXCHANGES       
First Line: When augusta, the teenaged impleada
Last Line: Night? Like the americans, she explained


DAY BOOK, SELS.       


DAYS OF 1944: THREE FRIENDS       
First Line: It wasn't safe to stay in saint-brieuc
Last Line: The fire took, while you lived, I played, at war


DAYS OF 1965       
First Line: Leaf-mulch, wood-smoke odor of lapsang souchong
Last Line: As a smoky memory, while a kitchen %resonates mozart


DAYS OF 1987       
First Line: We were coming down from the monastery


DAYS OF 1992       
First Line: I spent the morning waxing the furniture
Last Line: Letting the cries of the street subsume us


DAYS OF 1994: ALEXANDRIANS    Poem Text    
First Line: Lunch: as we close the twentieth century,
Subject(s): Aging; Transience; Cancer (disease); Food & Eating; Impermanence


DAYS OF 1999       
First Line: One unexceptional bright afternoon %in august, coming from the rose garden
Last Line: Blurts the repeated questions of the rain


DEAR JOOL, I MISS YOU IN SAINT-SATURNIN       
First Line: You mocked me that hot day at carcassonne
Last Line: But is for solitudes shared in the blue %vat of meridional air: for you


DESESPERANTO       
First Line: The dream's forfeit was a night in jail
Last Line: Of the dream's forfeit. One night in jail?


DESPERANTO    Poem Text    
First Line: The dream's forfeit was a night in jail
Subject(s): Roth, Joseph (1894-1939); Exiles


DINNER WITH ELIZABETH       
First Line: The iron doors opened on a gallery
Last Line: Whose leasehold names me resident for two


DIRECTIONS       
First Line: You knew the right title for all these years
Last Line: You know the right direction all these years


DUSK: JULY    Poem Text    
First Line: Late afternoon rain of a postponed summer
Subject(s): Literary Form; Love


DUSK: JULY       
First Line: Late afternoon rain of a postponed summer
Last Line: But we're alive now
Subject(s): Literary Form


EIGHT DAYS IN APRIL    Poem Text    
First Line: I broke a glass, got bloodstains on the sheet
Subject(s): Literary Form


EIGHT DAYS IN APRIL       
First Line: I broke a glass, got bloodstains on the sheet
Subject(s): Literary Form


ELEGY    Poem Text    
First Line: Crying from exile, I
Last Line: Alone, you are dead
Subject(s): Jazz; Joplin, Janis (1943-1970); Music & Musicians


ELEGY       
First Line: Crying from exile, I
Last Line: Alone, you are dead
Subject(s): Jazz; Joplin, Janis (1943-1970); Music And Musicians


ELEGY FOR A SOLDIER    Poem Text     Recitation by Author
First Line: The city where I knew you was swift
Subject(s): Jordan, June (1936-2002)


ELEGY FOR A SOLDIER       
First Line: The city where I knew you was swift
Last Line: Audre lorde, neruda, amichai, senghor, %and you, june jordan
Subject(s): Jordan, June (1936-2002)


ELEKTRA ON THIRD AVENUE       
First Line: At six, when april chills our hands and feet


ELEVENS       
First Line: James a. Wright, my difficult older brother
Subject(s): Man-woman Relationships; Women's Rights; Wright, James (1927-1980); Male-female Relations; Feminism


ELEVENS       
First Line: James a. Wright, my difficult older brother
Last Line: You are the fog of language on manhattan %where it's descending
Subject(s): Man-woman Relationships; Women's Rights; Wright, James (1927-1980)


ELYSIAN FIELDS    Poem Text    
First Line: Champs elysees of broadway' says the awning
Last Line: Under the awning frmo behind the glass
Subject(s): Restaurants; Cafes; Diners


ELYSIAN FIELDS       
First Line: Champs elysees of broadway' says the awning
Last Line: Under the awning from behind the glass
Subject(s): Restaurants


ESSAY ON DEPARTURE    Poem Text    
First Line: And when you leave, and no one's left behind
Subject(s): Farewell; Parting


ESSAY ON DEPARTURE       
First Line: And when you leave, and no one's left behind
Last Line: The place you were, the moment that you leave


FABLE       
First Line: A fox, a badger, any provident creature
Last Line: A wild duck's molting wings flapped in distress %between departure and the tls


FAREWELL TO THE FINLAND WOMAN       
First Line: Two thousand orphans, real ones and children of
Last Line: Womanhood, though they lose breasts and borders


FEELING AND FORM       
First Line: Dear san: everybody doesn't write poetry
Last Line: These lines, and yours, convergent, made, unlike; %that likelihood draws words I write poetry


FIFTEEN TO EIGHTEEN       
First Line: I'd almost know, the nights I snuck in late
Subject(s): Homosexuality


FIRST, I WANT TO MAKE YOU COME IN MY HAND    Poem Text    


FIRST, I WANT TO MAKE YOU COME IN MY HAND       
Last Line: Where I need you. I want you to make me come
Subject(s): Erotic Love


FOR JEAN MIGRENNE       
First Line: Mauve into purple, bent on foam-green stems
Last Line: Across the road that feeds the autoroute


FOR K.J., BETWEEN ANNIVERSARIES       
First Line: I'll call you, my time, midday on saturday
Last Line: Where you are with me when you're elsewhere, %lover and friend, in the ways we've chosen


FOR K.J., LEAVING AND COMING BACK    Poem Text    
First Line: August first: it was a year ago
Subject(s): Relationships; Separation


FOR L. J., LEAVING AND COMING BACK       
First Line: August first: it was a year ago
Last Line: Owned certainty; perpetual suprise


FOR THE 6TH OF APRIL       
First Line: Eden is %pots and tubs on the terrace
Last Line: Work their way up and spring comes


FOUND IN TRANSLATION [FOR CLAIRE MALROUX]    Poem Text    
First Line: On a beechwood sideboard there sat in state
Last Line: Music, carved wood, a blue ceramic tile
Subject(s): Children; Music Box; Translating & Interpreting; Childhood


FROM ORIENT POINT    Poem Text     Recitation
First Line: The art of living isn't hard to muster
Subject(s): Conduct Of Life


FROM ORIENT POINT       
First Line: The art of living isn't hard to muster
Last Line: Art; go on living: that's not hard to muster


GERDA IN THE EYRIE    Poem Text    
First Line: I almost love you. I've wanted to be you
Subject(s): Love


GHAZAL ON HALF A LINE BY ADRIENNE RICH       
First Line: In a familiar town, she waits for certain letters
Last Line: At night, after she draws the curtains? Letters


GOING AWAY FROM THE RIVER       
First Line: Midsummer's eve: rain slants into docked barges
Last Line: I can still get there, leave there, overland


GOING BACK TO THE RIVER       
First Line: Dusk, iridescent gasoline floats on the
Last Line: Meet me and walk with me to the river


GRAFFITI FROM THE GARE SAINT-MANQUE       
First Line: Outside the vineyard is a caravan


HANG-GLIDER'S DAUGHTER       
First Line: My forty-year-old father learned to fly
Last Line: Then it was me flying, feet still %on the road. We're here, on top of the hill
Subject(s): Fathers And Daughters


I WOKE UP, AND THE SURGEON SAID, YOU'RE CURED.       
First Line: I woke up, and the surgeon said, you're cured.
Last Line: To noon, when I would be wheeled back upstairs.


INTRODUCTORY LINES       
First Line: Rushing to press, it still would seem evasion
Last Line: P.S. There are no haiku; that's a mercy


INVOCATION       
First Line: This is for elsa, also known as liz
Last Line: Which we prefer to the alternative


IVA'S PANTOUM    Poem Text    
First Line: We pace each other for a long time.
Subject(s): Women; Relationships


JEAN-MICHEL GALIBETT, EPICIER A SAINT-JEAN-DE-FOS       
First Line: Reconstitute a sense to make of absence
Last Line: As the wind unwound the streamers in his yard


LA BOUGEOTTE       
First Line: It's not the name of the next town
Last Line: Not even two of them are on the highway


LA FONTAINE DE VAUCLUSE       
First Line: Azure striation swirls beyond the stones
Last Line: Fully hoist cold handsful from a crevice where %azure striation swirls beyond the stones


LANGUEDOCIENNE       
First Line: This morning the wind came, shaking the quince tree
Last Line: Nectarines under the poplar, wind in the quince tree


LAST APRIL INTERVAL       
First Line: Eight o'clock, nine o'clock
Last Line: Here to keep renegade %souls occupied


LATE AUGUST       
First Line: The weather is changing. The mountainous temperate cli
Last Line: What we'd need for a couple of days? All our conversations %touch on departure


LATE AUGUST LETTER       
First Line: Dear eavan, %just yesterday afternoon
Last Line: We might scale if I were there, %or you nearby, dear eavan


LE TRAVAIL RAJEUNIT       
First Line: Lace cushions were considered by a tall
Last Line: Too; then she joined the queue for eggs


LES SERPILLIERES       
First Line: To my upstairs writing-table, to hers downstairs
Last Line: Hung them on the line outside to dry


LETTER FROM GOOSE CREEK: APRIL       
First Line: We're both in greenville, but a state apart
Last Line: That change is: that one thing changes everything


LETTER TO MUNNSVILLE N.Y. FROM THE RUE DE TURENNE       
First Line: Hayden, my snow-field
Last Line: To come back up the four flights %and unlock the door


LINES DECLIMING A TRANSATLANTIC DINNER INVITATION       
First Line: Regretfully, I proffer my excuses


LINES DECLINING A TRANSATLANTIC DINNER INVITATION    Poem Text    
First Line: Regretfully, I proffer my excuses


LITERARY INITIATION C. 1960       
First Line: Expansively to his bar-entourage
Last Line: --'he's a genius, but he's a transvestite!'


LITTLE UNSENT LETTER FROM L'HERAULT       
First Line: The heat-inversion on your late-july


LONG ISLAND RAILROAD       
First Line: Brown-skinned manhattan students take the train
Last Line: They bag their beer at pennsylvania station
Subject(s): Long Island (n.y.); New York City; Railroads


LOVE, DEATH AND THE CHANGING OF THE SEASONS, SELS.       
First Line: First, I want to make you come in my hand


MARKET DAY       
First Line: Today is the jour de marche
Last Line: Now it's here, filled with things that I need: %today is the jour de marche


MIGRAINE SONNETS       
First Line: It's a long way from the bedroom to the kitchen
Last Line: It's a long way from the bedroom to the kitchen


MORNING NEWS    Poem Text     Recitation by Author
First Line: Spring wafts up the smell of bus exhaust, of bread
Subject(s): Politics & Government; War


MORNING NEWS       
First Line: Spring wafts up the smell of bus exhaust, of bread
Last Line: Time lessons with the signs for house, book, bread?
Subject(s): Politics; War


MOTHER 2       
First Line: No one is 'woman' to another
Last Line: Dwelling brown loquacious daughter, %corporeal exemplar of %her thirst for what she would not love?


MUSES       
First Line: Don't think I haven't noticed you
Last Line: To you tear up the rest of the house, I %will not be convinced %by your onyx %identical eyes


MYTHOLOGY    Poem Text    
First Line: Penelope as a garcon manque
Subject(s): Popular Culture - United States


MYTHOLOGY       
First Line: Penelope as a garcon manque
Subject(s): Popular Culture - United States


NEARLY A VALEDICTION       
First Line: You happened to me. I was happened to
Last Line: You were the epic in the episode. %you were the year poised on the equinox


NEARLY A VALEDICTORIAN    Poem Text    
First Line: You happened to me. I was happened to
Subject(s): Love; Separation


NIGHTS OF 1962: THE RIVER MERCHANT'S WIFE       
First Line: Emigree from the bronx, a married child
Last Line: Enough to hit whelan's for ham and eggs


NIGHTS OF 1964-1966: THE OLD RELIABLE    Poem Text    
First Line: White decorators interested in art
Subject(s): Aids (disease); Sickness; Illness


NIGHTS OF 1964-1966: THE OLD RELIABLE       
First Line: White decorators interested in art
Last Line: And so did I, and my three friends are dead
Subject(s): Aids (disease); Sickness


NIGHTS OF 1964€1966: THE OLD RELIABLE    Poem Text     Recitation by Author
First Line: White decorators interested in art,
Subject(s): Friendship; Relationships


OCTOBER       
First Line: There is memory, and there's the haze
Last Line: For a breath of paradox, you are in the present


ODD AND EVEN NUMBERS OF THE STREET       
First Line: The odd and even numbers of the street
Last Line: Became another form of gallows humor.


ON THE STAIRWAY       
First Line: My fourth-floor neighbor, mme. Uyttebroeck
Last Line: #name?


ONE MORE CAR POEM FOR JULIE       
First Line: I need transmission fluid for the brain
Last Line: Even the r-cinq won't start in the rain: %we need transmission fluid for the brain


ORDINARY WOMEN I       
First Line: I am the woman you see in bloomingdales's %ruffling the rack of children's
Last Line: I am the woman you will see blooming %up from our terror, with women: me, you


ORDINARY WOMEN II       
First Line: Mrs. Velez of the tenants' association %zig-zags her top-heavy shopping cart
Last Line: Not looking across the street, or down the street, %not looking at the sidewalk or the sky


PARAGRAPH FOR HAYDEN       
First Line: Quadruple bypass: yes, he had it
Last Line: Stay in the present tense. Stay in the present tense


PARAGRAPHS FROM A DAY-BOOK; FOR HAYDEN CARRUTH, SELS.       


QUAI DE VALMY       
First Line: The 3eme becomes the 10eme and 11eme
Last Line: With a january afternoon's brief clarity


QUEENSWAY       
First Line: A generosity of strawberries


RIPOSTE       
First Line: Dear tom, / when my next volume (granted: slender)
Subject(s): Disch, Tom (b. 1940); Man-woman Relationships; Women's Rights; Male-female Relations; Feminism


RIPOSTE       
First Line: Dear tom, %when my next volume (granted: slender)
Last Line: And you might find an artists' colony %a perfectly respectable resort
Subject(s): Disch, Tom (b. 1940); Man-woman Relationships; Women's Rights


RITES FOR COUSIN VIT       
First Line: Carried her unprotesting out the door
Last Line: In parks or alleys, comes happly on the verge %of happiness, haply hysterics. Is.


RONDEAU       
First Line: Why did ray leave her pipe tobacco ...?'


RONDEAU AFTER A TRANSATLANTIC TELEPHONE CALL       
First Line: Love, it was good to talk to you tonight


RUE DE BRETAGNE       
First Line: That afternoon in the rue de bretagne
Last Line: Remembering those lines of aragon


RUNAWAYS CAFE II    Poem Text    
First Line: For once, I hardly noticed what I ate
Subject(s): Desire


RUNAWAYS CAFE: 1       
First Line: For once, I hardly noticed what I ate
Last Line: For me, I might dare more if someone were


RUNAWAYS CAFE: 2       
First Line: For once, I hardly noticed what I ate
Last Line: At least I didn't get white sauce down my front


RUNE OF THE FINLLAND WOMAN       
First Line: She could bind the world's winds in a single strand
Last Line: She could bind the world's winds in a single strand


SATURDAY NIGHT BILE       
First Line: Multiple %relationships? I like waking up
Last Line: Twelve potential animosities, %saturday night bile


SELF       
First Line: I did it %differently
Last Line: Dialogue on the beautiful: quin- %tessentially human
Subject(s): Love


SEPARATE LIVES       
First Line: The last time I talked to you in my head
Last Line: The last time I talked to you in my head


SONNET       
First Line: Love drives its rackety blue caravan
Last Line: Ing at the edge. Predictably, it's cold.


SONNET ENDING WITH A FILM SUBTITLE    Poem Text    
Subject(s): Irony


SONNET ENDING WITH A FILM SUBTITLE       
Subject(s): Irony


SONNET FOR IVA       
First Line: The bathroom tiles are very pink and new
Last Line: This day. I cringe on the warm pink tiles of %a strange house. We cry on both sides of the door


SONNET ON A LINE FROM VENUS KHOURY-GHATA       
First Line: She recognized the seasons by their texture
Last Line: What equilibrium they can recover


SQUARE DU TEMPLE: ANOTHER AUGUST       
First Line: Two long-legged black girls jump double-dutch
Last Line: When will the moment be enough again?


SQUARES AND COURTYARDS       
First Line: Across the place du marche ste-catherine
Last Line: Thinking: she can, if anybody could


STREET SCENES: 1       
First Line: Wool scarf and leather
Last Line: A real storm--will my salmon begonia %breathe, or be battered?


STREET SCENES: 3       
First Line: Dusted with flour, pine-gold, the wand of bread
Last Line: #name?


STREET SCENES: 4       
First Line: Seven-thirty and lightly the rain continues
Last Line: Where else when the satcheled children file back to class


STREET SCENES: 5       
First Line: The german tour bus
Last Line: Should they have been born?


SYRIA RENGA    Poem Text     Recitation by Author
First Line: Driving a flatbed
Subject(s): Syria


TAKING NOTICE: 1.       
First Line: My child wants dolls, a tutu, that girls' world made
Last Line: The neighbor's tireless radio sings lies %through the thin wall behind my desk and bed


TAKING NOTICE: 10.       
First Line: The grizzled doorman lets the doctors' wives
Last Line: At our boot-toes blue-jeaned women slow-dance %to a rhythmic alto plaint of ruined romance


TAKING NOTICE: 11       
First Line: In the public theater lobby, I wait for marie
Last Line: I flush above the belt and throb below


TAKING NOTICE: 12.       
First Line: You're high on work, bouncing words off the ceiling
Last Line: Drenched feast whose mute wit is a mutual %silence honed in our rapt mouths to a sign


TAKING NOTICE: 13.       
First Line: No better lost than any other woman
Last Line: The unhealed woman hearing her own voice damn %her to the nightmares of the brooding girl


TAKING NOTICE: 14       
First Line: And I shout at iva, whine at you. Easily
Last Line: To a nude child, who's forgiven me - I think


TAKING NOTICE: 2.       
First Line: Morning: the phone jangles me from words: you
Last Line: At eight when I put iva on the bus, %stalling through iced slush between frost-rimed cars


TAKING NOTICE: 25       
First Line: We work, play, don't cross-reference calendars
Last Line: Accept the hard gift of your different sight?


TAKING NOTICE: 3.       
First Line: When that jackbooted choreography
Last Line: Skin, if I lost myself in you id'd be %no better lost than any other woman


TAKING NOTICE: 4.       
First Line: She twists scraps of her hair in unshelled snails
Last Line: Body, flaccid, gaunt in a greyed nightgown, %something more culpable for us then 'men.'


TAKING NOTICE: 5.       
First Line: I never will be only a lesbian.'
Last Line: Rhetoric, this. You talk about your friend. %I hold you, wanting whatever I want


TAKING NOTICE: 6.       
First Line: Angry, I speak, and pass the hurt to you
Last Line: (you say) the light is the same night and day, %but it feels like night at night anyway


TAKING NOTICE: 7.       
First Line: If we talk, we're too tired to make love; if we
Last Line: North, indulging some rich weave of weeks where %we'd work, play, not cross-reference calendars


THE HANG-GLIDER'S DAUGHTER    Poem Text    
First Line: My forty-year-old father learned to fly
Subject(s): Fathers & Daughters


THEN       
First Line: I was due home at seven, and you were
Last Line: Flights toward twilight traffic in chelsea


THIRD SNOWFALL    Poem Text    
First Line: Another storm, another blizzard
Subject(s): Snow


THREE SONNETS FOR IVA       
First Line: He tips his boy baby's hand in an icy
Subject(s): Homosexuality


TORCH       
First Line: Pillar of sequins in a saturday
Last Line: And a walk-out. She also stared young


TROISIEME SANS ASCENSEUR       
First Line: A square of sunlight on the study wall
Last Line: Tall north window, framing the winter sun


TURENNE / FRANCS-BOURGEOIS       
First Line: A winter tuesday morning: people shopped
Last Line: Across the street from them began to cry


TWO CITIES       
First Line: The streetlights bent
Last Line: At a fresh table while the floor was cleaned


UNDER THE ARC DE TRIOMPHE: OCTOBER 17    Poem Text    
First Line: The french clocks struck two-thirty, and above


UNTITLED    Poem Text    
First Line: You did say, need me less and I'll want you more.
Subject(s): Beauty


UNTITLED    Poem Text    
Subject(s): Lesbians; Beauty


UNWRAPPED ICON, TOO POTENT TO TOUCH       
First Line: An unwrapped icon, too potent to touch
Last Line: An unwrapped icon, too potent to touch


VENDANGES       
First Line: The spiral of a story in an ear
Last Line: What can you do but tell someone the story?


WAGERS       
First Line: I bet you don't wear shoulder pads in bed
Last Line: I bet you don't wear shoulderpads in bed


WEDNESDAY I.D. CLINIC    Poem Text    
First Line: Your words are ones the patients said themselves
Subject(s): Aids (disease); Sickness; Illness


WEDNESDAY I.D. CLINIC       
First Line: Your words are ones the patients said themselves
Last Line: Later. You could keep it to yourself. You won't
Subject(s): Aids (disease); Sickness