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Author: WINTERS, YVOR
Matches Found: 175


Lewis, Janet    Poet's Biography
Alternate Author Name(s): Winters, Janet Lewis; Winters, Yvor, Mrs.
93 poems available by this author


A LULLABY    Poem Text    
First Line: Lullee, lullay / I could not love thee more
Subject(s): Christmas; Religion; Nativity, The; Theology


ANCIENT ONES: BETATAKIN       
First Line: Time stays, they said. We go
Last Line: In time's unchanging room
Subject(s): Native Americans


ANISHINABEG IN THE CRANBERRY SWAMP       
First Line: Autumn bows %the headed grass
Last Line: Frost from hip to shoulder %like morning mist
Subject(s): Native Americans


APRIL HILL       
First Line: She did not climb the april hill'
Subject(s): Religion


BABY GOAT       
First Line: New-born, gilded with blood
Last Line: Into the spring's content, %into the spring's chill silvery content


BUILDING THE CABIN, EVERENS POINT       
First Line: Building had barely begun
Last Line: Wide enough to welcome bob barth


CALENDAR       
First Line: The quince bush in march
Last Line: And the birds of the air, indeed, %inhabit there


CANDLE FLAME       
First Line: I feel myself like the flame
Last Line: Were it not for the certain, ever-recurring calm %of the unknown sheltering palm


CARMEL HIGHLANDS    Poem Text    
First Line: Below the gardens and the darkening pines
Last Line: An ancient speech, hushed in tremendous ease.
Subject(s): Carmel, California


CAUTIONARY NOTE       
First Line: We have long known
Last Line: His eye is also on the crocodile


CHILD IN A GARDEN (III)       
First Line: It is the motion of the heart
Last Line: All too soon these lips will be %with heroes in eternity


CHORD       
First Line: In a moment of grief, a word
Last Line: Two notes that clung like lovers %and left me trembling


CLOCK       
First Line: Whose is the clock that strikes the hours
Last Line: Across still fields, whose silver shock %floats the warm air?


COUNTRY BURIAL       
First Line: After the words of the magnificence and doom
Last Line: Brings numbness to the untranslatable heart
Subject(s): Religion


CRADLE SONG       
First Line: Sleep, my baby, my own!
Last Line: So sleep, my little, my dear


DAYS       
First Line: Swift and subtle %the flying shuttle
Last Line: Of choice or change %no room, no room


DEAR PAST       
First Line: For the sake of the dear past
Last Line: Who could have this foreknown?


DIOS NO SE MUDA       
First Line: Doves call in the orchard where
Last Line: What presence embraces me now %in the still sunshine?
Subject(s): Teresa, Saint (1515-1582)


DURING ILLNESS       
First Line: Ah, landor, if thy page lay clear
Last Line: Even alcestis' quiet gaze
Subject(s): Landor, Walter Savage (1775-1864)


EARLY MORNING       
First Line: The path %the spider makes through the air
Last Line: Invisible, %until it finds the spider's web


EARTH-BOUND       
First Line: Still grove and hill and shadowy grot
Last Line: And sleep at last in heaven that is a grove


ELEGY FOR TWO FRIENDS       
First Line: Their curtains survive %the hands that made
Last Line: Where, for a time, %there was only one
Variant Title(s): For Nancy Bray And Gladys Mear


FAREWELL       
First Line: Here is no part %of that we loved
Last Line: And go, dear ashes, go
Subject(s): Mothers


FOR CARL RIPPIN       
First Line: Between midnight and morning %the hand relaxed
Last Line: The hand relaxed and so, %young man, farewell


FOR CLARA ATKINS ON HER 91ST BIRTHDAY       
First Line: Now to the young in heart I bring
Last Line: You keep your rendez-vous with spring


FOR ELIZABETH MADOX ROBERTS; WHO DIED MARCH 13, 1941       
First Line: From the confusion of estranging years
Last Line: Tears, and my earliest love, elizabeth, and changeless art
Subject(s): Roberts, Elizabeth Madox (1886-1941)


FOR JOHN MUIR, A CENTURY AND MORE AFTER HIS TIME       
First Line: I have seen those indians in their birch canoes
Last Line: Lifting a fragile head %to greet the sun
Subject(s): Muir, John (1838-1914)


FOR LOUISE CHENERY       
First Line: Why did you wait so long
Last Line: So did you wait, so fearful, %and so longing, hunted of god?


FOR LUCY       
First Line: The small cat nuzzles her head beneath my chin
Last Line: Comfort given, comfort received, we fall asleep


FOR MARGARET HAMILTON       
First Line: The imagination, powerful to paint
Last Line: Yet signed mortality, sweet friend
Subject(s): Friendship


FOR THE FATHER OF SANDRO GULOTTA       
First Line: When I called the children from play
Last Line: In their long, immortal day?


FOR THE POTTER       
First Line: Remembered in the pouring of milk
Last Line: In our remembrance, stay, %and in the serving of nourishment, share %each living day
Subject(s): Pottery And Potters; Sills, Esther (d. 1987)


FORSAN ET HAEC       
First Line: Forsan et haec olim-' how does it go, that line?
Last Line: Forsan et haec olim meminisse iuvabit
Subject(s): Stanford, Don (1913-1998)


FOSSIL, 1919    Poem Text    
First Line: I found a little ancient fern
Last Line: In a a round apricot velvet case.
Subject(s): Fossils


FOSSIL, 1975       
First Line: Changed and not changed. Three million years
Last Line: Changed and not changed. The spirit hears %in drifting fern the morning air
Subject(s): Fossils; Religion


FROM THE INDIANS IN THE WOODS: EXODUS AT EVENING       
First Line: Light came sideways %into the hole
Last Line: To bushes in the valley, %treading silky yarrow


FROM THE INDIANS IN THE WOODS: ONE SITS IN THE WOODS       
First Line: Gradual, continual approach
Last Line: Where the great ants climb


GARDEN NOTE I, LOS ALTOS       
First Line: A spring storm shakes the old peach tree
Last Line: Holds fast her white clusters


GARDEN NOTE II, MARCH       
First Line: Nothing more hesitant
Last Line: Under this same tree


GARDEN NOTE: LOS ALTOS, NOVEMBER       
First Line: The dusty loquat smells of cinnamon
Last Line: Loved presences, fair memories, and fair fame


GIRL HELP    Poem Text     Recitation
First Line: Mild and slow and young
Last Line: Scented with days to come.
Subject(s): Girls


GRANDMOTHER REMEMBERS       
First Line: Ah, the cold, cold days %when we lived
Last Line: Their shadows passed %our tent


HARD EARTH       
First Line: Here the houses


HE GOES AWAY AGAIN       
First Line: In thorny juniper %the wind is cold
Last Line: The spider, %making tight her web


HELEN GROWN OLD       
First Line: We have forgotten paris, and his fate
Last Line: The fading sound %is blent of falling embers, weeping kings


HYMNS BY FIRELIGHT       
First Line: Now the sweet cloudy voices rise and fall
Last Line: And the white ash gathers, heavy upon the coals


IN A CONVALESCENT HOSPITAL       
First Line: I say, lord, let her go
Last Line: And pray it bless %both her, and me


IN THE EGYPTIAN MUSEUM       
First Line: Under the lucent glass, %closed from the living air
Last Line: Pierces me with 'alas %that the beloved must die!'
Subject(s): Death; Museums


INDIANS IN THE WOODS       
First Line: Ah, the woods, the woods
Last Line: Needle and leaf and vine
Subject(s): Native Americans


KAYENTA, ARIZONA, MAY 1977       
First Line: I fall asleep to the sound of rain
Last Line: Turn, turn in the wind


LENORE'S BEAR       
First Line: A bear of crystal! %the surface encloses
Last Line: Within that prison, freedom, %and peace for the heart at last


LIKE SUMMER HAY       
First Line: Like summer hay it falls
Last Line: Laid two by two, brown %against the snow


LINES TO A KITTEN       
First Line: Morsel of suavity %perched on my knee
Last Line: Pure quality of your great treacherous race


LINES WITH A GIFT OF HERBS       
First Line: The summer's residue %in aromatic leaf
Last Line: Have all their might conserved %in treasure, finally
Subject(s): Herbs; Marcus Aurelius (121-180)


LOCKET       
First Line: My father had a locket, smooth gold
Last Line: Closed, the line of the hinges barely showed


LOST GARDEN       
First Line: Children asleep in deep meadows
Last Line: Your garden is running away!
Subject(s): Cadotte, Pauline (polly) (1900-1955) "; Gardens And Gardening


LOVE POEM       
First Line: Instinctively, unwittingly, %I came unto your hand
Last Line: The vintner, and his heavy head %in vineyards overgrown


LULLABY       
First Line: Lullee, lullay %I could not love thee more
Last Line: But loved him just the same. %lullee, lullee, lullay
Subject(s): Christmas; Religion


LULLABY, SUNMOUNT       
First Line: Creep into your narrow bed
Last Line: Gently sleep and wake to find %the certain day


MANGER       
First Line: What is the sweet savor?
Last Line: Laid over the floor!


MANIBUSH AND THE GRANDMOTHER       
First Line: With keen ankles %dividing weed and weed
Last Line: I watch the flashing %in the grass
Subject(s): Native Americans


MAY IN THE DESERT       
First Line: The dove of jesus turns
Last Line: To stony earth, %where the faint voices float


MEADOW TURF       
First Line: Goldenrod, strawberry leaf, small %bristling aster, all
Last Line: Oh, heart, here is your healing, here among %the fragrant living and dead


MELISSA'S BOUQUET       
First Line: Rose, and rose-of-sharon
Last Line: Should yield such treasure, %thanks be to god, at noon, at dawn


MORNING DEVOTION       
First Line: In the fear of death I ask me
Last Line: Feel all's complete at day's as at life's ending


MUSIC AT A CONCERT       
First Line: This is the many-mansioned, built in air
Last Line: Whereby my loss is, for a time, denied


NIGHTFALL AMONG POPLARS       
First Line: As light grew horizontal
Last Line: The quick dry spider %ran across my hand


NON OMNIS MORIAR       
First Line: Non omnis moriar. In narrow pathways
Last Line: Image of gentleness and peace, so be not lost


OCTOBER MORNING       
First Line: The pump froze, the trees
Last Line: Were dozens of honey bees


OJIBWAY VILLAGE       
First Line: Among gray cones %odor of sweet grass %and warm bodies
Last Line: These bodies, so still %in the deluge %of fine air
Subject(s): Native Americans; Ojibwa Indians


OLD LOVE       
First Line: Love that is rooted deep, %quiet as friendship seeming
Last Line: How at late day returning %those meet who need not part


OUT OF A DARK WOOD       
First Line: Out of a dark wood we stumble, spirit-led
Last Line: So sorrow, bless us before we go away


READER       
First Line: Sun creeps under the eaves
Last Line: Heaving damp heavy wings


REMEMBERED MORNING       
First Line: The axe rings in the wood
Last Line: Catches her into its way


RIVALS       
First Line: Two women in an empty room
Last Line: But both of them still hear it blow


RIVER       
First Line: Remember for me the river
Last Line: Who will not be able to remember. %remember the river
Subject(s): St. Mary's River (north America)


ROCKY ISLANDS       
First Line: There are wolves %cracking dry bones
Last Line: Over the light %still flakes of rock


ROSE       
First Line: It has become a simile, its meaning
Last Line: Rose, for whom I have no proper words, %in charity accept these


ROSEMARY, BAY AND REDWOOD SPRAY       
Last Line: So love stays green with stars between %while his star burneth evenly
Subject(s): Michigan


SNAIL GARDEN       
First Line: This is the twilight hour of the morning
Last Line: That necessary angel, that other


SUNDAY MORNING AT THE ARTIST'S HOUSE       
First Line: Small cat with the white lines of make-up


TENNIS PLAYERS       
First Line: Their flying feet are swift
Last Line: Dreaming I watch them yet %across a continent


THE HANGAR AT SUNNYVALE: 1937    Poem Text    
First Line: Above the marsh, a hollow monument
Last Line: Until the inordinate dream again return.
Subject(s): Airships


THRESHING WIND       
First Line: Cold and clear weather, %and the wind harries us
Last Line: Drawing the sharp green leaves %against his shoulder
Subject(s): Native Americans


TIME AND MUSIC       
First Line: Time, that gives to music life
Last Line: Both snare and breath and motion is
Subject(s): Literary Form


TO A YOUNG HUSBAND       
First Line: When she shall grow like the clear daffodil
Last Line: And thank her as the witness she may be


TO THE POET, CLAYTON STAFFORD, FOR HIS VERSE       
First Line: O measured line and sure
Last Line: Through thine ennobling grace
Subject(s): Stafford, Clayton (1903-1981)


TRAVEL NOTE       
First Line: A steeple like a lightning rod
Last Line: To the last edge of grief


TROPHY, W.W.I       
First Line: A cross, %I had it from a friend, a russian woman
Last Line: In itself it says: %verdun %and the death of a man
Subject(s): World War I


ULYSSES IN THE LAND OF THE PHAEACIANS       
First Line: Not ithaca, but here
Last Line: Sea-blue, but firmest earth, %and vanishing no more


WHITE OAK       
First Line: I grow forever in one place, yet stir
Subject(s): Oak Trees


WIFE OF MANIBOZHO SINGS       
First Line: He comes and goes; %there is no rest
Last Line: Lie still %under the sun
Subject(s): Native Americans - Religion


WINTER GARDEN       
First Line: Child, dream of a pomegranate tree
Last Line: That not a leaf in your garden perish



Winters, Yvor    Poet's Biography
82 poems available by this author


A SONG IN PASSING    Poem Text    
First Line: Where am I now? And what
Last Line: Is the almight face
Subject(s): Religion; Theology


AN ELEGY    Poem Text    
First Line: The noon is beautiful: the perfect wheel
Subject(s): Airships


APOLLO AND DAPHNE       
First Line: Deep in the leafy fierceness of the wood
Last Line: The god withdrew into eternity


APRIL    Poem Text    
First Line: The little goat
Last Line: He walks away
Subject(s): Animals


APRIL       
First Line: The little goat
Last Line: He walks away
Subject(s): Animals


AT THE SAN FRANCISCO AIRPORT    Poem Text    
First Line: This is the terminal: the light
Last Line: In light, and nothing else, awake.
Subject(s): Air Travel; Language; Words; Vocabulary


AT THE SAN FRANCISCO AIRPORT       
First Line: This is the terminal: the light
Last Line: In light, and nothing else, awake
Subject(s): Air Travel; Language


BARNYARD       
First Line: The wind appears %and disappears
Last Line: The clotting cold %with short fierce cries


BEFORE DISASTER; WINTER, 1932-33    Poem Text    
First Line: Evening traffic homeward burns
Last Line: We must live or dry by steel
Subject(s): Traffic


BEFORE DISASTER; WINTER, 1932-33       
First Line: Evening traffic homeward burns
Last Line: Treading change with savage heel, %we must love or die by steel
Subject(s): Traffic


BY THE ROAD TO THE SUNNYVALE AIR-BASE       
First Line: The calloused grass lies hard
Last Line: I hear my neighbor's bees


COLD       
First Line: Frigidity the hesitant %uncurls its tentacles
Last Line: Smoky breath, no %breath at all


DEATH GOES BEFORE ME       
First Line: Death goes before me on his hands and knees


DIGUE DONDAINE, DIGUE DONDON       
First Line: Sun on the sidewalk


ELEGY       
First Line: The noon is beautiful: the perfect wheel
Last Line: Through the last stone age, for the pastoral kings
Subject(s): Airships


ELEGY ON A YOUNG AIREDALE BITCH LOST TWO YEARS SINCE IN THE SALT-MARSH    Poem Text    
First Line: Low to the water's edge
Last Line: And cast ashore to dry
Subject(s): Animals; Dogs


ELEGY ON A YOUNG AIREDALE BITCH LOST TWO YEARS SINCE IN THE SALT-MARSH       
First Line: Low to the water's edge
Last Line: And cast ashore to dry
Subject(s): Animals; Dogs


FABLE       
First Line: Beyond the steady rock the steady sea
Last Line: Lending a sheen to nothing, whispering


FALL OF LEAVES       
First Line: The green has suddenly %divided to pure flame
Last Line: Into the burning ground


FOR MY FATHER'S GRAVE       
First Line: Here lies one sweet of heart.
Last Line: These ashes speak no more


FOR THE OPENING OF THE WILLIAM DINSMORE BRIGGS ROOM    Poem Text    
First Line: Because our being grows in mind
Last Line: Which hell itself cannot unlock
Subject(s): Religion; Theology


FOR THE OPENING OF THE WILLIAM DINSMORE BRIGGS ROOM       
First Line: Because our being grows in mind
Subject(s): Religion


GRAVE       
First Line: Great eucalypti, black amid the flame
Last Line: Of him at peace to contemplate it not


HERACLES; FOR DON STANFORD       
First Line: Eurystheus, trembling, called me to the throne
Last Line: And deianira, an imperfect shade, %retreats in silence as my arc descends


HYMN TO DISPEL HATRED AT MIDNIGHT       
First Line: Here where I watch the dew
Last Line: Grief will not turn again
Subject(s): Hate


IN PRAISE OF CALIFORNIA WINES    Poem Text    
First Line: Amid these clear and windy hills
Last Line: In sunlight vanish quite away
Subject(s): California; Wine


IN PRAISE OF CALIFORNIA WINES       
First Line: Amid these clear and windy hills
Last Line: In sunlight vanish quite away
Subject(s): Americans; United States


INSCRIPTION FOR A GRAVEYARD       
First Line: When men are laid away
Subject(s): Religion


JOHN SUTTER    Poem Text    
First Line: I was the patriarch of the shining land
Subject(s): California - Gold Discoveries; Sutter, John (1803-1880); Failure; Gold Rush; Forty-niners


JOHN SUTTER       
First Line: I was the patriarch of the shining land
Last Line: The final drouth of penitential tears?


JOURNEY; SNAKE RIVER COUNTRY       
First Line: I now remembered slowly how I came
Last Line: In naked sunlight, on a naked world


LITTLE DIETY ALONE IN THE DESERT       
First Line: My life is here


MAGPIE'S SHADOW: 1. IN WINTER       
First Line: Pale mornings, and %I rise
Last Line: I, bent. Thin nights receding


MAGPIE'S SHADOW: 2. IN SPRING       
First Line: I walk out the world's door
Last Line: Why should I stop %for spring?


MAGPIE'S SHADOW: 3. IN SUMMER AND AUTUMN       
First Line: Pale bees! Oh, whither now?
Last Line: The well of autumn-dry


MARRIAGE       
First Line: Incarnate for our marriage you appeared
Last Line: May our heirs seal us in a single urn, %a single spirit never to return
Subject(s): Love; Love - Marital; Marriage


NIGHT OF BATTLE    Poem Text    
First Line: Impersonal the aim
Last Line: The dark blood of the folk.
Subject(s): World War Ii; Second World War


NIGHT OF BATTLE       
First Line: Impersonal the aim
Last Line: The dark blood of the folk
Subject(s): World War Ii


NOCTURNE       
First Line: Moonlight on stubbleshining hills
Last Line: Goes screaming %off toward darker hills


OCTOBER       
First Line: The houses %are more bare
Last Line: In one thing: %that it hides nothing


ON A VIEW OF PASADENA FROM THE HILLS       
First Line: From the high terrace porch I watch the dawn
Last Line: Rank with the sea, which crumbles evermore


ON TEACHING THE YOUNG       
First Line: The young are quick of speech
Last Line: Is in cold certitude- %laurel, archaic, rude


ORPHEUS; IN MEMORY OF HART CRANE       
First Line: Climbing from the lethal dead
Last Line: Sang unmeaning down the stream


PRAYER BESIDE A LAMP       
First Line: I pace beside my books and hear the


PRAYER FOR MY SON       
First Line: Eternal spirit, you %whose will maintains the world
Last Line: Pity this small and new %bright soul on hands and knees


PRINCE       
First Line: Prince or statesman who would rise to power


QUOD TEGIT OMNIA       
First Line: Earth darkens and is beaded
Last Line: Embedded in this crystalline %precipitate of time


REALIZATION       
First Line: Death. Nothing is simpler. One is dead
Last Line: Blurring a definition. Quick! You are old


ROWS OF COLD TREES       
First Line: To be my own messiah to the
Last Line: Among the blessed who have latin names


SILENT DAYS       
First Line: Here men go


SIR GAWAINE AND THE GREEN KNIGHT    Poem Text     Recitation by Author
First Line: Reptilian green the wrinkled throat
Subject(s): Knights & Knighthood


SIR GAWAINE AND THE GREEN KNIGHT       
First Line: Reptilian green the wrinkled throat
Last Line: I found a road that men had made %and rested on a drying hill
Subject(s): Knights And Knighthood


SLOW PACIFIC SWELL       
First Line: Far out of sight, forever stands the sea
Last Line: Or gathers seaward, ebbing out of mind
Subject(s): Sea


SOLITUDE OF GLASS       
First Line: Ne ferns, but


SOLITUDE OF GLASS       
First Line: No ferns, but %fringed rock
Last Line: Gathered to %the adamant


SONG IN PASSING       
First Line: Where am I now? And what
Subject(s): Religion


SONG OF A SMALL BOY WHO HERDS GOATS       
First Line: Sweeter than rough hair


STREETS       
First Line: The algebra of miracles, that


SUMMER COMMENTARY       
First Line: When I was young, with sharper sense
Last Line: Smears brandy on the trampling boot %and sends it sweeter on its way


SUMMER NOON: 1941       
First Line: With visionary care
Last Line: Will repossess this ground


TESTAMENT       
First Line: We will and move: the gain


THE MARRIAGE    Poem Text    
First Line: Incarnate for our marriage you appeared
Subject(s): Love; Love - Marital; Marriage; Wedded Love; Marriage - Love; Weddings; Husbands; Wives


THE SLOW PACIFIC SWELL    Poem Text     Recitation by Author
First Line: Far out of sight, forever stands the sea
Subject(s): Sea; Ocean


THESEUS: A TRILOGY; FOR HENRY RAMSEY       
First Line: On the wet sand the queen emerged from forest
Last Line: So cast him from the rock to solitude, %to the cold perfection of unending peace


TIME AND THE GARDEN       
First Line: The spring has darkened with activity
Last Line: The mind's immortal, but the man is dead


TO A MILITARY RIFLE, 1942    Poem Text    
First Line: The times come round again
Last Line: True shape of death and power
Subject(s): War


TO A MILITARY RIFLE, 1942       
First Line: The times come round again
Subject(s): War


TO A YOUNG WRITER    Poem Text    
First Line: Here for a few short years
Subject(s): Writing & Writers


TO A YOUNG WRITER       
First Line: Here for a few short years
Last Line: What moves you overmuch


TO EMILY DICKINSON    Poem Text    
First Line: Dear emily, my tears would burn your page,
Last Line: In that hard argument which led to god
Subject(s): Dickinson, Emily (1830-1886)


TO EMILY DICKINSON       
First Line: Dear emily, my tears would burn your page,
Last Line: In that hard argument which led to god.
Subject(s): Dickinson, Emily (1830-1886)


TO MY INFANT DAUGHTER: 1       
First Line: Ah, cold you now with thinking tongue
Last Line: A token only and a name?


TO MY INFANT DAUGHTER: 2    Poem Text    
First Line: Alas, that I should be
Last Line: Of what has had an end
Variant Title(s): To My Infant Daughter (2)
Subject(s): Fathers & Daughters


TO MY INFANT DAUGHTER: 2       
First Line: Alas, that I should be
Last Line: Of what has had an end
Variant Title(s): To My Infant Daughter (2
Subject(s): Fathers And Daughters


TO THE HOLY SPIRIT; FROM A DESERTED GRAVEYARD IN SALINAS       
First Line: Immeasurable haze: %the desert valley spreads
Last Line: Quiet beyond recall, %into irrelevance


TO THE MOON       
First Line: Goddess of poetry, %maiden of icy stone
Last Line: What is your pleasure now?


TWO SONGS OF ADVENT: 1       
First Line: On the desert, between pale mountains, our cities
Last Line: Far whispers creeping through an ancient shell


TWO SONGS OF ADVENT: 2       
First Line: Coyote, on delicate mocking feet
Last Line: Listen! Listen! For I enter now your thought


VACANT LOT       
First Line: Tough hair like dead
Last Line: Turns back and nips %the bitter grass


VISION       
First Line: Years had elapsed; the long room was the same
Last Line: Wide open, and the tremor of that scream %shattered my beinglike an empty dream


WILD SUNFLOWER       
First Line: Sunflower! Gross of leaf and porous
Last Line: Not be beaten %down nor turn away


WINTER EVENING       
First Line: The earth for miles is massed with wet