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Subject: AMERICAN REVOLUTION
Matches Found: 287

"BRAVE PAULDING AND THE SPY [SEPTEMBER 23, 1780]", by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: Come all you brave americans
Last Line: "success to north america, / ye sons of liberty"
Subject(s): "american Revolution;andre, John (1750-1780);paulding, John (1758-1818);soldiers;


"EVACUATION OF NEW YORK BY THE BRITISH, 1783", by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: They come!-they come!-the heroes come
Last Line: "and bless, oh! Bless america!"
Subject(s): American Revolution;freedom;new York City - Revolutionary Period;peace;victory; Liberty


"INDEPENDENCE BELL - JULY 4, 1776", by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: There was a tumult in the city
Last Line: "which, please god, shall never die!"
Subject(s): American Revolution;fourth Of July;liberty Bell;patriotism; Independence Day


"OFF FROM BOSTON [MARCH 4, 1776]", by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: "sons of valor, taste the glories"
Last Line: "from this land, so happy, driven, / never stain its bosom more"
Subject(s): American Revolution;boston


A BALLAD FOR A BOY, by WILLIAM JOHNSON CORY    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: When george the third was reigning, a hundred years ago
Last Line: And treat some rescued breton as a comrade and a guest.
Subject(s): American Revolution - French Involvement; Farmer, George; Navy - Great Britain; English Navy


A BALLAD OF PRINCETON BATTLE, by HENRY VAN DYKE    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Along assunpink's woody bank we left our campfires
Last Line: The men who make a nation great are men who dare to die.
Alternate Author Name(s): Civis Americanus
Subject(s): American Revolution; Princeton, Battle Of (1777)


A CAPE COD WOOD ROAD, by AMOS RUSSEL WELLS    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: The silent woodlands bend above
Last Line: The real is here, it is not there!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Cape Cod; Roads; Paths; Trails


A DIALOGUE BETWEEN GEORGE AND FOX, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Good charly fox, your counsel I implore
Last Line: And france, triumphant, stems the subject main.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Fox, Charles James (1749-1806); George Iii, King Of England (1738-1820); Great Britain - Foreign Relations; Navy - France; Navy - Great Britain; Navy - Spain; French Navy; English Navy; Spanish Navy


A DIALOGUE INTITLED THE KIND MASTER AND THE DUTIFUL SERVANT, by JUPITER HAMMON    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Come my servant, follow me
Last Line: And seek the joy of heav'n. Finis.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Worship


A LONDON DIALOGUE, BETWEEN MY LORDS, DUNMORE AND GERMAINE, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Ever since I returned to my dear native shore
Last Line: We can spare you some hundreds to pay for the dozen.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Murray, John. 4th Earl Of Dunmore


A NEW BALLAD, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: "rouse, britons! At length"
Last Line: "a frenchman, a spaniard, a yankee! / derry down, down, hey derry down"
Subject(s): American Revolution


A NEW WAR SONG BY SIR PETER PARKER, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: "my lords, with your leave"
Last Line: "the continent, whole, / we will take, be my soul, / if the cowardly yankees will let us"
Subject(s): "american Revolution;charleston, South Carolina;parker, Sir Peter (1721-1811);


A NEW YORK TORY TO HIS FRIEND IN PHILADELPHIA, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Dear sir, I'm so anxious to hear of your health
Last Line: The rebellion is done -- for the trumbull is taken!
Subject(s): American Revolution


A NEW YORK TORY'S EPISTLE TO ONE OF HIS FRIENDS, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Dark glooms the day that sees me leave this shore
Last Line: He reigns secure the monarch of the wild.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Exiles


A PASQUINADE, by JOSEPH STANSBURY    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Has the marquis of lafayette
Last Line: "witness burgoyne, and two famous brothers!"
Variant Title(s): A New Song
Subject(s): American Revolution


A PICTURE OF HIS TIMES, WITH OCCASIONAL REFLECTIONS, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Still round the world triumphant discord flies
Last Line: Emerge new mountains, or new oceans rise.
Subject(s): American Revolution


A POEM CONTAINING SOME REMARKS ON THE PRESENT WAR, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: Britons grown big with pride
Last Line: Their raptured tongues do tell / their joys great
Subject(s): American Revolution;boston


A RENEGADO EPISTLE TO THE INDEPENDENT AMERICANS, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: We tories, who lately were frightened away
Last Line: The worst that can happen is -- feathers and tar.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Exiles; Treason & Traitors


A SONG, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: "smile, massachusetts, smile"
Last Line: "defiance bid to tyrants' frown, / and glory will your valor crown"
Subject(s): American Revolution;boston


A SONG, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: "hark! 'tis freedom that calls, come, patriots"
Last Line: And strew the way over with flowers
Subject(s): American Revolution;soldiers


A SONG ABOUT CHARLESTON, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: King hancock sat in regal state
Last Line: "hearts which with native valor glowed, / hearts of true british mould"
Subject(s): "american Revolution;charleston, South Carolina;lincoln, Benjamin (1733-1810);


A SONG FOR LEXINGTON, by ROBERT KELLEY WEEKS    Poem Text                
First Line: The spring came earlier on
Last Line: Our first immortal name!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Fourth Of July; Lexington, Battle Of (1775); Independence Day; Concord, Battle Of


A SPEECH THAT SHOULD HAVE BEEN SPOKEN BY THE KING ..., by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: My lords, I can hardly from weeping refrain
Last Line: Let us conquer -- or go to the devil together.
Subject(s): American Revolution; George Iii, King Of England (1738-1820)


AARON BURR'S WOOING, by EDMUND CLARENCE STEDMAN    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: From the commander's quarters on westchester
Last Line: "he'll forgive this night's tryst with the widow prevost!"
Subject(s): American Revolution; Burr, Aaron (1756-1836); Courtship


ABOUT SAVANNAH, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: Come let us rejoice
Last Line: "huzza for the king and prevost, sir"
Subject(s): "american Revolution;estaing, Jean Baptiste De (1729-1794);navy - France;prevost, Augustine;savannah, Georgia;" French Navy


ACROSS THE DELAWARE, by WILLIAM MCKENDREE CARLETON    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: The winter night is cold and drear
Last Line: And god has crossed the delaware!
Alternate Author Name(s): Carleton, Will
Subject(s): American Revolution; Delaware (river); Trenton, Battle Of (1776)


AH, 'TIS IN VAIN THE PEACEFUL DIN, by HENRY DAVID THOREAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
Last Line: By no laconian rill
Subject(s): New England; American Revolution


AMERICA A PROPHECY, by WILLIAM BLAKE    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: The shadowy daughter of urthona stood before red orc
Last Line: But tho' obscur'd, this is the form of the angelic land.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Bible; Mythology; Prophecy & Prophets


AMERICA FOREVER; OR, A DEFIANCE TO THE BULWARK OF RELIGION, by UNKNOWN    Poem Source                
First Line: Great britain in her glory, american doth engage
Last Line: We will try the operation with powder, shot and bull
Subject(s): American Revolution; Navy - United States


AMERICA INDEPENDENT, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: To him who would relate the story right
Last Line: Wafting the produce of the rural vale.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Great Britain


AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE, by FRANCIS HOPKINSON    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Make room, all ye kingdoms, in history renown
Last Line: When men fight for freedom, they must be victorious.
Variant Title(s): Camp Ballad
Subject(s): American Revolution; United States - Continental Congress; United States - Declaration Of Independence


AMERICAN LIBERTY, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Source                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Great guardians of our freedom, we pursue
Last Line: Suc is the godlike glory to be free
Subject(s): American Revolution; Independence


AMERICAN TIMES, by JONATHAN ODELL    Poem Source                
First Line: When faction, pois'nous as the scorpion's
Last Line: And indignation gathers in the verse
Subject(s): American Revolution - French Involvement; Freedom; U.s. - Congress


AN ADDRESS TO THE COMMANDER IN CHIEF ... AMERICAN ARMY, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Accept, great men, that share of honest praise
Last Line: Alike in merits, and alike in fame!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Army - United States; Presidents, United States; Washington, George (1732-1799)


AN ANCIENT PROPHECY, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: When a certain great king, whose initial is g
Last Line: And your lion shall growl, but hardly bite more. --
Subject(s): American Revolution; Cornwallis, Charles (1738-1805); George Iii, King Of England (1738-1820)


ANDRE, by CHARLOTTE FISKE BATES    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: This is the place where andre met that death
Last Line: Had been his name, -- if that, indeed, could be!
Alternate Author Name(s): Roge, Mme.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Andre, John (1750-1780); Capital Punishment; Soldiers; Hanging; Executions; Death Penalty


ANDRE'S LAST REQUEST [OR, REQUEST TO WASHINGTON] [OCTOBER 1, 1780], by NATHANIEL PARKER WILLIS    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: It is not the fear of death
Last Line: By a soldier's death!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Andre, John (1750-1780); Capital Punishment; History; Military Justice; Presidents, United States; Soldiers; Washington, George (1732-1799); Hanging; Executions; Death Penalty; Historians; Courts Martial


ARNOLD AT STILLWATER, by THOMAS DUNN ENGLISH    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Ah, you mistake me, comrades, to think that my heart is steel!
Last Line: Fell from the patriot's heaven down to the loyalist's hell!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Arnold, Benedict (1741-1801); Courage; Soldiers; Valor; Bravery


ARNOLD THE VILE TRAITOR, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: "arnold! The name, as heretofore, / shall now be benedict no more"
Last Line: "and odious for the blackest crimes, / arnold shall stink to latest times"
Subject(s): "american Revolution;arnold, Benedict (1741-1801);soldiers;


ARNOLD'S DEPARTURE, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: With evil omens from the harbour sails / the ill-fated ship that worthless arnol
Last Line: And a fat lamb, in sacrifice, shall die.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Arnold, Benedict (1741-1801); Soldiers; Treason & Traitors


ASSUNPINK AND PRINCETON [JANUARY 3, 1777], by THOMAS DUNN ENGLISH    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Glorious the day when in arms at assunpink
Last Line: And you and your children would not have been free.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Cornwallis, Charles (1738-1805); Princeton, Battle Of (1777); Reed, James (1724-1807); St. Clair, Arthur (1736-1818)


BALLAD, by UNKNOWN    Poem Source                
First Line: Rise, rise, bright genius rise
Last Line: Sing washington and common sense
Subject(s): American Revolution; Freedom; U.s. - Continental Army; War


BARNEY'S INVITATION, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Come all ye lads who know no fear
Last Line: Success to the hyder ali.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Barney, Joshua (1759-1818); Navy - United States; Sea Battles; American Navy; Naval Warfare


BATTLE OF LEXINGTON, by SIDNEY LANIER    Poem Source                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Then haste ye, prescott and revere!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Lexington, Battle Of (1775)


BATTLE OF TRENTON, by UNKNOWN    Poem Source                
First Line: On christmas day in seventy-six
Subject(s): American Revolution


BEELZEBUB'S REMONSTRANCE (ON RIVINGTON'S APOLOGY FOR LYING), by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Your golden dreams, your flattering schemes
Last Line: Will bolt him in, and keep him there!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Lies; Rivington, James (1724-1803)


BENNINGTON, by WILLIAM HENRY BABCOCK    Poem Text                
First Line: A cycle was closed and rounded
Last Line: The earthworks at bennington.
Alternate Author Name(s): Babcock, W. H.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Bennington, Battle Of (1777)


BETTY ZANE, by THOMAS DUNN ENGLISH    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Women are timid, cower and shrink
Last Line: Mingles the blood of betty zane.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Fort Henry, Battle Of (1777); Native Americans; Zane, Elizabeth; Indians Of America; American Indians; Indians Of South America


BICENTENNIAL, by JOHN CIARDI                    Poet's Biography
First Line: This official bicentennial arts person programming
Subject(s): American Revolution Bicentennial (1976); Williams, William Carlos (1883-1963)


BICENTENNIAL, by JOHN CIARDI    Poem Source                 Poet's Biography
First Line: This official bicentennial arts person programming
Last Line: A wall of buttons blinking data dead
Subject(s): American Revolution Bicentennial (1976); Williams, William Carlos (1883-1963)


BIRTHDAY SONG, by JONATHAN ODELL    Poem Source                
First Line: Time was when america hallow'd the morn
Subject(s): American Revolution


BOLD HAWTHORNE [OR, HATHORNE], by UNKNOWN    Poem Source                
First Line: The twenty-second of august
Subject(s): American Revolution


BOSTON COMMON: 1774, by OLIVER WENDELL HOLMES    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: The streets are thronged with trampling feet
Last Line: The pipe-clayed belts of gage's men.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Boston


BOSTON TEA, by DAVID WADSWORTH CANNON JR.    Poem Source                
First Line: The ladies of the d.A.R
Subject(s): Daughters Of The American Revolution


BUNKER HILL, by GEORGE HENRY CALVERT    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Not yet, not yet; steady, steady!
Last Line: His steed he spurred, in haste to lead such noble men.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Bunker Hill, Battle Of


BUNKER HILL, by WILLIAM A. PHELON    Poem Text                
First Line: A low redoubt, dug into tumbled earth--
Last Line: Of bunker, hill, and its immortal name!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Bunker Hill, Battle Of; War


BUNKER HILL, JUNE 17, by GEORGE LUNT    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Hill, on whose green, eternal crest
Last Line: Mid the old fires of bunker-hill!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Bunker Hill, Battle Of; Patriotism; Soldiers; War


BUNKER HILL, JUNE 17, 1840, by GEORGE LUNT    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: We've been up the brave old hill, brother
Last Line: Still keep it free, or die!'
Subject(s): American Revolution; Bunker Hill, Battle Of; Soldiers


BUNKER'S HILL, by JOHN NEAL    Poem Source                
First Line: No shout disturbed the night
Subject(s): American Revolution; Bunker Hill, Battle Of


BUNKER'S HILL, OR THE SOLDIER'S LAMENTATION, by JOHN FREETH    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: I am a jolly soldier, / enlisted years ago
Last Line: Be destined to the cord.
Alternate Author Name(s): Free, John
Subject(s): American Revolution; Bunker Hill, Battle Of; Fights; Lament; Soldiers


BURGOYNE'S PROCLAMATION, by WILLIAM+(1) LIVINGSTON    Poem Source                
First Line: By john burgoyne and burgoyne john, sir
Subject(s): American Revolution; Burgoyne, John (1722-1792)


CALDWELL OF SPRINGFIELD [JUNE 23, 1780], by FRANCIS BRET HARTE    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Here's the spot. Look around you. Above on the height
Last Line: But not always a hero like this, -- and that's all.
Alternate Author Name(s): Harte, Bret
Subject(s): American Revolution; Caldwell, James (1734-1781); New Jersey; Patriotism; Revenge


CAPTAIN JONES' INVITATION, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Thou, who on some dark mountain's brow
Last Line: Learn what it is to go to sea.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Jones, John Paul (1747-1792); Sea; Ocean


CAPTAIN MOLLY AT MONMOUTH, by WILLIAM COLLINS (1721-1759)    Poem Source                 Poet's Biography
First Line: On the bloody field of monmouth flashed the guns of greene and wayne
Variant Title(s): Molly Maguire At Monmout
Subject(s): American Revolution; Maguire, Molly


CARMEN BELLICOSUM, by GUY HUMPHREYS MCMASTER    Poem Text                
First Line: In their ragged regimentals
Last Line: Hurling death!
Variant Title(s): The Old Continentals
Subject(s): American Revolution; Brandywine Creek, Battle Of (1777); Patriotism; War


CHARLESTON RETAKEN; DEC. 14, 1782, by PAUL HAMILTON HAYNE    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: As some half-vanquished lion
Last Line: Did slowly disappear.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Charleston, South Carolina


CONCORD HYMN; SUNG AT COMPLETION OF CONCORD MONUMENT, 1836, by RALPH WALDO EMERSON    Poem Text     Poem Explanation             Poet's Biography
First Line: By the rude bridge that arched the flood
Last Line: The shaft we raise to them and thee.
Variant Title(s): The Concord Fight;hymn: Sung At The Completion Of The Concord Mounument
Subject(s): American Revolution; Americans; Concord, Massachusetts; Fourth Of July; Freedom; Massachusetts; Monuments; Mourning; Napoleon I (1769-1821); Patriotism; Soldiers; United States; War; Independence Day; Liberty; Bereavement; America


CONVIVIAL SONG FOR GENERAL MORRIS, by ROYALL TYLER    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Talk not of your washingtons
Last Line: The governor's seat.
Alternate Author Name(s): Old Simon; S.
Subject(s): Allen, Ira (1751-1814); American Revolution; Bradley, Stephen R. (1754-1830); Chittenden, Thomas (1730-1797); Enos, Roger; Lyon, Matthew (1746-1822); Morris, Lewis Richard (1760-1825); Sullivan, John (1740-1795); Tichenor, Isaac (1754-1838); Vermont


CORNWALLIS'S SURRENDER, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: When british troops first landed here
Last Line: And may great britain rue the day / her hostile bands came hither
Variant Title(s): Cornwallis Burgoyned
Subject(s): "american Revolution;cornwallis, Charles (1738-1805);yorktown Campaign (1781);


CRUISE OF THE FAIR AMERICAN, by UNKNOWN    Poem Source                
First Line: The twenty-second of august
Last Line: Success to fair america %and our good privateer
Subject(s): American Revolution; Navy - United States


CRY TO BATTLE, by JONATHAN MITCHELL SEWALL    Poem Source                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Ye see mankind the same in every age
Last Line: But the whole boundless continent is %yours!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Heroism; Military Service, Compulsory; Tyranny And Tyrants; U.s. - History


DAUGHTERS (AND SONS) OF THE MAERICAN REVOLUTION, by G. TOD STONE    Poem Source                
First Line: I stare at that old photo %anonymous blackman engulfed
Last Line: Black-faced %though some are white today...
Subject(s): American Revolution; Photography And Photographers


DAWN AT LEXINGTON, by KATHARINE LEE BATES    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: A stealthy tramping through the dark
Last Line: Flooding the world with light!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Lexington, Battle Of (1775); Revere, Paul (1735-1818); War; Concord, Battle Of


DIALOGUE, AT HYDE-PARK CORNER, LONDON, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Let those, who will, be proud and sneer
Last Line: We'll stay and guard our native shore.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Burgoyne, John (1722-1792); Cornwallis, Charles (1738-1805)


ENGLAND AND AMERICA IN 1782, by ALFRED TENNYSON    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: O thou, that sendest out the man
Last Line: Will vibrate to the doom.
Alternate Author Name(s): Tennyson, Lord Alfred; Tennyson, 1st Baron; Tennyson Of Aldworth And Farringford, Baron
Subject(s): American Revolution; Freedom; Great Britain; Patriotism; Liberty


EPIGRAM, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: Quote satan to arnold: 'my worthy good fellow'
Last Line: "you'll permit me, I hope, to die in my shoes"
Subject(s): "american Revolution;arnold, Benedict (1741-1801);soldiers;


EPIGRAM, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: "rudely forced to drink tea, massachusetts"
Last Line: The one who begins or resists the assault? Save
Subject(s): American Revolution;boston Tea Party


EPIGRAM, OCCASIONED BY TITLE OF RIVINGTON'S ROYAL GAZETTE, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Says satan to jemmy, 'I hold you a bet'
Last Line: "a sett of new types, and a sett of new lies."
Subject(s): American Revolution; Lies; Newspapers; Rivington, James (1724-1803); Journalism; Journalists


ETHAN ALLEN, SELS., by GEORGE LANSING RAYMOND    Poem Source                
First Line: The bell that rang at lexington
Subject(s): Allen, Ethan (1738-1789); American Revolution; Soldiers


EVACUATION OF NEW YORK BY THE BRITISH, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: They come! They come! The heroes come
Last Line: "the toast is, 'freedom's favorite son, / health, peace, and joy to washington"
Subject(s): American Revolution;new York City; "manhattan;new York, New York;the Big Apple;


FABLE, by DAVID MATTHEWS    Poem Source                
First Line: Rejoice, americans, rejoice!
Last Line: Frenchmen, like storks, love frogs--to eat 'em
Subject(s): American Revolution - French Involvement; Independence; U.s. - Congress; U.s. - Politics And Government


FAVORITE SONG, CELEBRATING THE NAVAL PROWESS OF AMERICA, by UNKNOWN    Poem Source                
First Line: That power that form'd th' unmeasur'd seas
Last Line: The continent, and all the sea, %but rule proud albion too
Subject(s): American Revolution; Navy - United States


FORT GRISWOLD, SEPT. 6, 1781, by JOHN GARDINER CALKINS BRAINARD    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: What seek ye here - ye desperate band?
Last Line: Beside the fisher's bay.
Subject(s): American Revolution


FOURTH OF JULY ODE, by JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Our fathers fought for liberty
Last Line: But ourselves must set us free.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Fourth Of July; Independence Day


FREE AMERICA, by JOSEPH WARREN    Poem Text             Recitation     Poet's Biography
First Line: That seat of science, athens
Last Line: Of brave america.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Freedom; Liberty


GENERAL GAGE'S SOLILOQUY, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Why, let the stricken deer go weep
Last Line: "let north and george themselves such battles fight."
Subject(s): American Revolution; Gage, Thomas (1721-1787)


GENERAL HOWE'S LETTER, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: As to kidnap the congress has long been my aim
Last Line: "but, fighting or flying, - I'm your very humble"
Subject(s): "american Revolution;howe, Richard. Earl Howe (1726-1799);


GENERAL MERCER AT PRINCETON, by CHARLES DAVIS PLATT    Poem Text                
First Line: Here mercer fell, with bayonet-pierced breast
Last Line: And kindle in men's hearts the heroic flame.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Generals; Princeton, Battle Of (1777)


GEORGE THE THIRD'S SOLILOQUY, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: What mean these dreams, and hideous forms that rise
Last Line: Or share, what still is worse -- old charles's fate.
Subject(s): American Revolution; George Iii, King Of England (1738-1820)


GRANDMOTHER'S STORY OF BUNKER HILL BATTLE, by OLIVER WENDELL HOLMES    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Tis like stirring living embers when, at eighty, one remembers
Last Line: All are here!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Boston; Bunker Hill, Battle Of


HAARLEM HEIGHTS, by ARTHUR GUITERMAN    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: They've turned at last! Goodby, king george
Last Line: That we shall claim our own!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Harlem Heights, Battle Of (1776); New York City - Revolutionary Period


HANDS ACROSS SEA, by ROBERT UNDERWOOD JOHNSON    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: England, thou breeder of heroes and of bards
Last Line: "that was the noblest conquest of her rule""?"
Subject(s): American Revolution


HER MONOLOGUE OF DARK CREPE WITH EDGES OF LIGHT, by NORMAN DUBIE    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Mistress adrienne, I have been given a bed with a pink dresser
Last Line: Don't hear from you I will try to understand. Chloe.
Subject(s): Adventure & Adventurers; American Revolution; Girls; Librarians & Libraries; Murder; Teaching & Teachers; Library; Librarians; Educators; Professors


HYMN OF THE MORAVIAN NUNS OF BETHLEHEM; ... PULASKI'S BANNER, by HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: When the dying flame of day
Last Line: And it was his martial cloak and shroud!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Pulaski, Casimir (1747-1779); Southern States; South (u.s.)


INDEPENDENCE, by UNKNOWN    Poem Source                
First Line: Come all you brave soldiers, both valiant and free
Last Line: And from all who'd deprive us of our %liberty
Subject(s): American Revolution; Fourth Of July; Freedom; Soldiers; U.s. - Congress; U.s. - Declaration Of Independence


JASPER AT FORT MOULTRIE, by EFFIE WALLER SMITH    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: I'm only a sergeant!' jasper said
Last Line: All honor and praise to you!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Courage; Flags - United States; Patriotism; Valor; Bravery; American Flag


LEXINGTON, by PERCY MACKAYE    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Where is the little town of lexington?
Last Line: "let lexington be still our revolution-cry!"
Alternate Author Name(s): Mackaye, Percy Wallace
Subject(s): American Revolution; Freedom; Lexington, Battle Of (1775); Revolutions; Liberty; Concord, Battle Of


LEXINGTON DAY, 1905, by AMELIA WOODWARD TRUESDELL    Poem Text                
First Line: On the hundred and thirtieth lexington day
Last Line: To our sons may he be their buckler and shield!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Battleships; Freedom; Heroism; Lexington, Battle Of (1775); Patriotism; Liberty; Heroes; Heroines; Concord, Battle Of


LEXINGTON [APRIL 19, 1775], by OLIVER WENDELL HOLMES    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Slowly the mist o'er the meadow was creeping
Last Line: Floats the fair emblem her heroes have won!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Lexington, Battle Of (1775); Concord, Battle Of


LEXINGTON; 1775, by JOHN GREENLEAF WHITTIER    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: No berserk thirst of blood had they
Last Line: The lion of our motherland!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Lexington, Battle Of (1775); Concord, Battle Of


LIBERTY POLE SATIRIZED, by UNKNOWN    Poem Source                
First Line: Come, listen, good neighbors of every degree
Last Line: And, huzzah king george and our %country for ever! %dery down, etc
Subject(s): American Revolution; Freedom; U.s. - Colonial Period


LIBERTY TREE, by THOMAS PAINE    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: In a chariot of light from the regions of day
Last Line: In defence of our liberty tree.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Freedom; United States - Continental Congress; War; Liberty


LINES OCCASIONED BY RIVINGTON'S NEW TITUAL TYPES ..., by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Well - now (said the devil) it looks something better!
Last Line: Of him and his arms I'll be the engraver.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Newspapers; Rivington, James (1724-1803); Journalism; Journalists


LINES WRITTEN ... ONE WHO HAD WATCHED .. AMERICAN & FRENCH REVOLUTIONS, by THOMAS LOVELL BEDDOES    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: As an almighty night doth pass away
Last Line: From the pale temples of the awakening world.
Subject(s): American Revolution; French Revolution (1789)


LINES; SUGGESTED BY GRAVES TWO ENGLISH SOLDIERS ON CONCORD, by JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: The same good blood that now-refills
Last Line: Your graves send courage forth, and might.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Concord, Massachusetts


LORD CORNWALLIS TO SIR HENRY CLINTON, FROM YORK, VIRGINIA, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: From clouds of smoke, and flames that round me glow
Last Line: Nor leaves one triumph, even to hope for, more.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Clinton, Sir Henry (1738-1795); Cornwallis, Charles (1738-1805)


LORD DUNMORE'S PETITION TO THE LEGISLATURE OF VIRGINIA, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Humbly sheweth, / that a silly old fellow, much noted of yore
Last Line: And your humble petitioner ever shall pray.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Murray, John. 4th Earl Of Dunmore; Virginia (state)


LORD NORTH'S RECANTATION, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: When north first began
Last Line: Our glory at most / is only that - tyrants recant
Subject(s): "american Revolution;north, Frederick, Lord (1732-1792);" "north, Frederick. 2d Earl Of Guilford;


LOYALIST SONG, by JOSEPH STANSBURY    Poem Source                
First Line: I've heard in old times that a sage used to say
Variant Title(s): Let Us Be As Happy As Long As We Ca
Subject(s): American Revolution


M'FINGAL, SELS., by JOHN TRUMBULL                   
Subject(s): American Revolution; Social Protest


MACDONALD'S RAID - A.D. 1780, by PAUL HAMILTON HAYNE    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: I remember it well; 'twas a morn dull and gray
Last Line: To those gallant old times when we fought 'gainst the king.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Marion, Francis (1737-1795); South Carolina


MANHATTAN CITY; A PICTURE, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Fair mistress of a warlike state
Last Line: And nova-scotia only claims.
Subject(s): American Revolution; New York City; Manhattan; New York, New York; The Big Apple


MARYLAND RESOLVES, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: On calvert's plains new faction reigns
Last Line: "from real griefs, from factious elves, / will speedily relieve ye"
Subject(s): American Revolution;maryland


MASSACHUSETTS SONG OF LIBERTY, by MERCY OTIS WARREN    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Come swallow your bumpers, ye tories, & roar
Last Line: In freedom we're born, etc.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Freedom; Massachusetts; Liberty


MINUTE MEN, by CLYDE ROBERTSON    Poem Text                
First Line: A dead man on a windy dune
Last Line: "wrote in blood for liberty."
Subject(s): American Revolution


MODERN IDOLATRY, OR ENGLISH QUIXOTISM, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: My native shades delight no more
Last Line: And worship wooden monarchs -- out of fear --
Subject(s): American Revolution; Great Britain


MOLLY PITCHER [JUNE 28, 1778], by LAURA ELIZABETH HOWE RICHARDS    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: All day the great guns barked and roared
Last Line: To hold the name of molly pitcher.
Alternate Author Name(s): Richards, Laura E.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Monmouth, Battle Of (1778); Pitcher, Molly (1754-1832); Mcguire, Molly; Mccauley, Mary Ludwig Hays


MOLLY PITCHER [JUNE 28, 1778], by KATE BROWNLEE SHERWOOD    Poem Text                
First Line: Twas hurry and scurry at monmouth town
Last Line: And the army was wild with cheers.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Monmouth, Battle Of (1778); Pitcher, Molly (1754-1832); Mcguire, Molly; Mccauley, Mary Ludwig Hays


MONTGOMERY AT QUEBEC, by CLINTON SCOLLARD    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Round quebec's embattled walls
Last Line: To the brave montgomery!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Courage; Montgomery, Richard (1738-1775); Quebec, Battle Of (1775); Valor; Bravery


MORGAN STANWOOD; CAPE ANN, 1775, by HIRAM RICH    Poem Text                
First Line: Morgan stanwood, patriot!
Last Line: After all, we meet.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Soldiers


MUGFORD'S VICTORY, by JOHN WHITE CHADWICK    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Our mother, the pride of us all
Last Line: And who brought him, though dead, to his own!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Mugford, James; Navy - United States; Sea Battles; American Navy; Naval Warfare


NATHAN HALE, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: The breezes went steadily through the tall pines
Last Line: "tell tyrants, to you their allegiance they owe. / no fears for the brave; no fears for the brave"
Variant Title(s): The Ballad Of Nathan Hale
Subject(s): "american Revolution;hale, Nathan (1755-1776);


NATHAN HALE, by EUGENE GEARY    Poem Source                
First Line: Speed, speed thee forth,' said washington
Subject(s): American Revolution; Hale, Nathan (1755-1776)


NATHAN HALE, by WILLIAM ORDWAY PARTRIDGE    Poem Source                
First Line: One hero dies,-a thousand new ones rise
Subject(s): American Revolution; Hale, Nathan (1755-1776)


NATHAN HALE, by SARA KING WILEY    Poem Source                
First Line: Swiftly through the silent forest
Alternate Author Name(s): Drummond, Sarah King Wiley
Subject(s): American Revolution; Hale, Nathan (1755-1776)


NATHAN HALE [SEPTEMBER 22, 1776], by FRANCIS MILES FINCH    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: To drum-beat and heart-beat
Last Line: The name of hale shall burn!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Freedom; Hale, Nathan (1755-1776); New York City; Patriotism; Liberty; Manhattan; New York, New York; The Big Apple


NATHAN HALE, SEPTEMBER 22, 1776, by JOHN MACMULLEN    Poem Text                
First Line: Come all alumni gather round
Last Line: Amidst the patriot band.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Capital Punishment; Hale, Nathan (1755-1776); Memory; New York City; Patriotism; Hanging; Executions; Death Penalty; Manhattan; New York, New York; The Big Apple


NATHAN HALE, THE MARTYR SPY, by ISAAC HINTON BROWN    Poem Source                
First Line: Twas in the year that gave the nation birth
Subject(s): American Revolution; Hale, Nathan (1755-1776)


NEW ENGLAND'S CHEVY CHASE, by EDWARD EVERETT HALE    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Twas the dead of night. By the pine-knot's red light
Last Line: Has the old bay state seen such a hunting again.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Lexington, Battle Of (1775); Concord, Battle Of


NEW ENGLAND'S DEAD!, by ISAAC MCLELLAN JR.    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: New england's dead! New england's dead!
Last Line: For they have passed away.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Freedom; Liberty


NEWS FROM YORKTOWN, by LEWIS WORTHINGTON SMITH    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Past two o'clock and cornwallis is taken
Last Line: Like a cry for god's justice born!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Cornwallis, Charles (1738-1805); Yorktown Campaign (1781)


NORTHERN SOLDIER (1), by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Source                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Ours not to sleep in shady bowers
Subject(s): American Revolution; Army - United States


OCCASIONED BY GENERAL WASHINGTON'S ARRIVAL IN PHILADELPHIA, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: The great unequal conflict passed
Last Line: And all the pageant scene expires.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Presidents, United States; Washington, George (1732-1799)


ODE ON THE CELEBRATION OF THE BATTLE OF BUNKER HILL, SELS., by GRENVILLE MELLEN    Poem Source                
Subject(s): American Revolution; Bunker Hill, Battle Of


ODE READ AT 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF FIGHT AT CONCORD BRIDGE, by JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Who cometh over the hills
Last Line: And makes us deserve to be free!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Concord, Massachusetts


ODE; FOR THE ANNIVERSARY OF THE WASHINGTON LIGHT INFANTRY, by CHARLES SPRAGUE    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: The bugle is hushed, and the war-blade is sheathed
Last Line: "sleep, spoiler of nations, the slumber of time!"
Subject(s): American Revolution; Lafayette, Marie Joseph, Marquis De; Presidents, United States; Veterans; Washington, George (1732-1799)


ON A HESSIAN DEBARKATION, 1776, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Rejoice, o death! - britannia's tyrant sends / from the german plains
Last Line: To meet the vengeance that awaits them there.
Subject(s): American Revolution


ON DISBANDING THE ARMY, by DAVID HUMPHREYS    Poem Text                
First Line: Ye brave columbian bands! A long farewell!
Last Line: Thither by death-tides borne, as ye full soon have been.
Subject(s): American Revolution


ON GENERAL ROBERTSON'S PROCLAMATION, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Old judas the traitor (nor need we much wonder)
Last Line: "huzza for the congress! -- the devil take the king."
Subject(s): American Revolution


ON INDEPENDENCE, by JONATHAN MITCHELL SEWALL    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Come all you brave soldiers, both valiant and free
Last Line: And from all who'd deprive us of our liberty.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Fourth Of July; Independence Day


ON MR. RIVINGTON'S NEW ENGRAVED KINGS ARMS .. ROYAL GAZETTE, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: From the regions of night, with his head in a sack
Last Line: "the inventor, as well as the printer of lies."
Subject(s): American Revolution; Newspapers; Rivington, James (1724-1803); Journalism; Journalists


ON SIR HENRY CLINTON'S RECALL, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: The dog that is beat has a right to complain
Last Line: The treaty to break with our gallic ally.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Carleton, Sir Guy. 1st Baron Dorchester; Clinton, Sir Henry (1738-1795)


ON SYMPATHISERS WITH THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION, by CHARLES WESLEY    Poem Source                 Poet's Biography
First Line: What hope of safety to our realm
Last Line: And saved, with us, for ever live!
Subject(s): American Revolution


ON THE BRITISH KING'S SPEECH ... PEACE WITH AMERICAN STATES, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Grown sick of war, and war's alarms
Last Line: And whitehead, thou to write his epitaph.
Subject(s): American Revolution; George Iii, King Of England (1738-1820)


ON THE DEATH OF A REPUBLICAN PATRIOT AND STATESMAN, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Soon to the grave descends each honored name
Last Line: Nor traitors triumph while the patriot dies.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Patriotism; Reed, Joseph (1741-1785)


ON THE DEATH OF CAPTAIN NICHOLAS BIDDLE, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: What distant thunders rend the skies
Last Line: And lost what honor won.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Biddle, Nicholas (1786-1844); Navy - United States; American Navy


ON THE DEATH OF COLONEL LAURENS, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Since on her plains this generous chief expired
Last Line: The brave man's homage, and immortal fame!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Laurens, John (1754-1782)


ON THE DEPARTURE OF THE BRITISH FROM CHARLESTON, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: His triumphs of a moment done
Last Line: "these for their country fought and bled."
Subject(s): American Revolution; Charleston, South Carolina


ON THE FALL OF GENERAL EARL CORNWALLIS, 1781, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: A chieftain, formed on howe, burgoyne, and gage
Last Line: Shrink from an injured world -- and fare like you.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Cornwallis, Charles (1738-1805); Yorktown Campaign (1781)


ON THE LATE ROYAL SLOOP-OF-WAR GENERAL MONK, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: When the washington ship by the english was beat
Last Line: "all her guns should be wooden -- to suit with his head."
Subject(s): American Revolution; General Monk (ship); Montagu, John, 4th Earl Of Sandwich; Navy - United States; Sea Battles; Twitcher, Jemmy; American Navy; Naval Warfare


ON THE MEMORABLE VICTORY OF PAUL JONES, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: O'er the rough main with flowing sheet
Last Line: They trembled and ador'd.
Variant Title(s): Bonhomme Richard And Serapis
Subject(s): American Revolution; Bon Homme Richard (ship); Jones, John Paul (1747-1792); Navy - United States; Sea Battles; American Navy; Naval Warfare


ON THE NEW AMERICAN FRIGATE ALLIANCE, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: As neptune traced the azure main
Last Line: "these sail -- to vanquish tyranny."" --"
Subject(s): American Revolution; Navy - United States; Ships & Shipping; American Navy


ON THE SNAKE DEPICTED AT THE HEAD OF SOME NEWSPAPERS, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: "ye sons of sedition, how comes it to pass"
Last Line: For the head of the serpent we know should be bruis'd
Subject(s): American Revolution


PARODY PARODIZED, by UNKNOWN    Poem Source                
First Line: Come, swallow your bumpers, ye tories
Last Line: Who dreads not a fetter much more than %a sword
Subject(s): American Revolution; Freedom; Heroism; Militarism; Soldiers; War


PARSON ALLEN'S RIDE [AUGUST 15, 1777], by WALLACE BRUCE    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: The 'catamount tavern' is lively tonight
Last Line: The parson who came in his one-horse chaise.
Subject(s): Allen, Thomas (1743-1810); American Revolution; Bennington, Battle Of (1777); Clergy; Priests; Rabbis; Ministers; Bishops


PARSON CALDWELL OF SPRINGFIELD, by CHARLES DAVIS PLATT    Poem Text                
First Line: See the red-coats in the distance!
Last Line: Put to flight those red dragoons.
Subject(s): American Revolution


PASTORAL SONG, by JOSEPH STANSBURY    Poem Source                
First Line: When war with his bellowing sound
Last Line: With pleasures as simple and pure
Subject(s): American Revolution; Peace


PAUL JONES - A NEW SONG, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: Of heroes and statesmen I'll just mention four
Last Line: "may they all fare alike, and the de'il pick the bones / of green, jemmy twitcher, lord north, and p
Subject(s): "american Revolution;jones, John Paul (1747-1792);montagu, John, 4th Earl Of Sandwich;navy - United States;north, Frederick, Lord (1732-1792);" "twitcher, Jemmy;american Navy;north, Frederick. 2d Earl Of Guilford;


PAUL JONES' VICTORY, by UNKNOWN    Poem Source                
First Line: An american frigate, a frigate of fame
Last Line: The loss of her sons in the ocean so deep. %hurrah! Hurrah! Our country for ever, hurrah!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Bon Homme Richard (ship); Jones, John Paul (1747-1792); Navy - United States; Sea Battles


PENELOPE'S CHRISTMAS DANCE, by VIRGINIA WOODWARD CLOUD    Poem Text                
First Line: Mistress penelope penwick, she
Last Line: "called by her father, ""my sweet p."
Variant Title(s): The Ballad Of Sweet P
Subject(s): American Revolution; Christmas; Trenton, Battle Of (1776); Nativity, The


POEM OF BUNKER HILL: CONCLUSION, by HARRY BROWN    Poem Source                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Then once more men's ears were full of yankee doodle
Last Line: And see in their deaths the power of our defenses
Subject(s): American Revolution; Bunker Hill, Battle Of; Freedom


POLITICAL BIOGRAPHY: GAINE'S LIFE, CITY OF NEW YORK, 1783, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: To the senate of york
Last Line: Your humble petitioner -- honest -- hugh gaine.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Gaine, Hugh (1726-1807); Municipal Government; New York City; Newspapers; Manhattan; New York, New York; The Big Apple; Journalism; Journalists


PRESENT AGE, by UNKNOWN    Poem Source                
First Line: Of all the ages ever known
Last Line: I fear you'll see the right on't
Subject(s): American Revolution; Friends, Religious Society Of; Independence; Life Change Events


PROLOGUE TO A THEATRICAL ENTERTAINMENT IN PHILADELPHIA, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Source                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Wars, cruel wars, and hostile britain's rage
Last Line: While discord, sinking, veils her ghastly %head
Subject(s): American Revolution - French Involvement; Independence; Peace


PROLOGUE TO KING JOHN, by WILLIAM BLAKE    Poem Source                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Justice hath heaved a sword to plunge in albion's breast
Last Line: Sing as to the rising year!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Bible; Mythology


PROLOGUE. INTENDED FOR A DRAMATIC PIECE OF KING EDWARD THE FOURTH, by WILLIAM BLAKE    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: O for a voice like thunder, and a tongue
Last Line: Hear it not, heaven, thy ministers have done it!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Bible; Mythology


PUTNAM, by SARA JANE CLARKE LIPPINCOTT    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Let the haughty smile, the low defame
Last Line: Was the soldier's welcome there.
Alternate Author Name(s): Greenwood, Grace
Subject(s): American Revolution; Putnam, Israel (1718-1790)


REVOLUTIONARY STORY, by ALICE CARY    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Good mother, what quaint legend are you reading
Last Line: "who ever have been loved."
Subject(s): Women Old Age; Books; Roses; American Revolution; Love Loss Of; Memory


RIVINGTON'S CONFESSIONS ADDRESSED TO THE WHIGS OF NEW YORK, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Long life and low spirits were never my choice
Last Line: And he'll turn a true blue-skin, or just what you will. --
Subject(s): American Revolution; Confessions; Rivington, James (1724-1803)


RIVINGTON'S LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Since life is uncertain, and no one can say
Last Line: Squire john coghill knap, and brother hugh gaine.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Rivington, James (1724-1803); Wills


RIVINGTON'S REFLECTIONS, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: The more I reflect, the more plain it appears
Last Line: Ye may swear that poor jemmy would have to sing mass.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Rivington, James (1724-1803)


RODGERS & VICTORY: TIT FOR TAT, by UNKNOWN    Poem Source                
First Line: John bull, who has for ten years past
Last Line: And strike aloud the merry stave %of yankee doodle dandy
Subject(s): American Revolution; Little Belt (ship); Navy - United States; Rodgers, John (1773-1838); Sea Battles


RODNEY'S RIDE [JULY 3, 1776], by ELBRIDGE STREETER BROOKS    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: In that soft mid-land where the breezes bear
Last Line: The day of delegate rodney's ride.
Variant Title(s): Caesar Rodney's Ride
Subject(s): American Revolution; Rodney, Caesar (1728-1784); United States - Continental Congress; United States - Declaration Of Independence


ROGERS AND BINGHAM, by UNKNOWN    Poem Source                
First Line: Once bingham took the little belt
Last Line: From insult to protect our flag, %and tell an honest story
Subject(s): American Revolution; Little Belt (ship); Navy - United States; Rodgers, John (1773-1838)


ROGERS AND VICTORY, by UNKNOWN    Poem Source                
First Line: One night it was bout nine o'clock
Last Line: Dey get it hot, as dey could sup, %hotter as french brandy
Subject(s): American Revolution; Navy - United States; President (ship); Rodgers, John (1773-1838); Sea Battles


RUNNING THE BLOCKADE, by NORA PERRY    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: When the french fleet lay
Last Line: Who had run the blockade!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Boston Harbor, Blockade Of (1778); Navy - France; Navy - Great Britain; French Navy; English Navy


SAINT LEGER, by CLINTON SCOLLARD    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: From out of the north-land his leaguer he led
Last Line: Saint leger!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Oriskany, Battle Of (1777); Saint Leger, Barry (1737-1789)


SARATOGA SONG, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: "come unto me, ye heroes"
Last Line: And vain is their endeavor / who strive to do us harm
Subject(s): American Revolution;saratoga Campaign (1777)


SERGEANT CHAMPE, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: Come sheathe your swords! My gallant boys
Last Line: "arnold's to blame for andre's fame, / and andre's to be pitied"
Subject(s): "american Revolution;andre, John (1750-1780);arnold, Benedict (1741-1801);champe, John;soldiers;


SIR GUY CARLETON'S ADDESS TO THE AMERICANS, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: From britain's famed island once more I come
Last Line: And further at present I choose not to say.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Carleton, Sir Guy. 1st Baron Dorchester


SIR GUY'S ANSWER, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: We have reason to think there will soon be a peace
Last Line: Farewell of new-york -- and away to jamaica.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Carleton, Sir Guy. 1st Baron Dorchester


SIR HENRY CLINTON'S INVITATION TO THE REFUGEES, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Come, gentlemen tories, firm, loyal, and true
Last Line: Who are born to be hang'd, will never be shot.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Clinton, Sir Henry (1738-1795); New York City; Refugees; Manhattan; New York, New York; The Big Apple


SOLILOQUY OF ARNOLD, by EDWARD C. JONES    Poem Source                
First Line: The plan is fixed; I fluctuate no more
Subject(s): American Revolution; Arnold, Benedict (1741-1801); Soldiers


SONG, by JONATHAN ODELL    Poem Source                
First Line: How sweet is the season, the sky how serene
Last Line: And wish all the world were as happy as %we
Subject(s): American Revolution; Independence; Protestantism


SONG OF MARION'S MEN, by WILLIAM CULLEN BRYANT    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Our band is few, but true and tried
Last Line: Forever from our shore.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Marion, Francis (1737-1795); South Carolina; War


SONG OF THE VERMONTERS, 1779, by JOHN GREENLEAF WHITTIER    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Ho - all to the borders! Vermonters, come down
Last Line: In the name of vermont we defy all the world!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Vermont


SONG OF THE WAR, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: In their ragged regimentals
Last Line: "roared the iron six-pounder, / hurling death!"
Variant Title(s): The Old Continentals
Subject(s): American Revolution


SONG ON CAPTAIN BARNEY'S VICTORY OVER SHIP GENERAL MONK, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: O'er the waste of waters cruising
Last Line: Yields the sceptre of the main.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Barney, Joshua (1759-1818); General Monk (ship); Navy - United States; Sea Battles; American Navy; Naval Warfare


SPLENDID ISOLATION; A MORAL FROM LEXINTON, 1775, by KATHARINE LEE BATES    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Oh, but my husband, matthew
Last Line: At last it mattered to him.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Lexington, Battle Of (1775); Concord, Battle Of


SUMTER'S BAND, by JAMES WRIGHT SIMMONS    Poem Text                
First Line: When carolina's hope grew pale
Last Line: Their watchword is thy memory!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Sumter, Thomas (1734-1832); Virginia (state)


SURE NEVER WAS A PICTURE DRAWN MORE TO LIFE, by UNKNOWN    Poem Source                
Last Line: Those dare be free' %'hearts of oak, etc'
Subject(s): American Revolution; Freedom; Heroism


SWORD OF BUNKER HILL, by WILLIAM ROSS WALLACE    Poem Source                
First Line: He lay upon his dying bed
Subject(s): American Revolution; Bunker Hill, Battle Of


TALES OF A WAYSIDE INN: THE FIRST DAY: PAUL REVERE'S RIDE [APRIL 1775], by HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW    Poem Text     Poem Explanation             Poet's Biography
First Line: Listen, my children, and you shall hear
Last Line: And the midnight message of paul revere.
Variant Title(s): The Landlord's Tale
Subject(s): American Revolution; Americans; Fourth Of July; Freedom; Massachusetts; Revere, Paul (1735-1818); United States; Independence Day; Liberty; America


TAXATION IN AMERICA, by PETER ST. JOHN    Poem Source                
First Line: While I relate my story
Subject(s): American Revolution


THANKSGIVING HYMN, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: "the lord above, in tender love"
Last Line: "come let us all before him fall, / and glorify his name"
Subject(s): American Revolution;holidays;thanksgiving


THE AMERICAN FLAG, by JOSEPH RODMAN DRAKE    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: When freedom, from her mountain height
Last Line: And freedom's banner streaming o'er us!
Alternate Author Name(s): Croaker
Variant Title(s): Flag Of The Free
Subject(s): American Revolution; Flags - United States; Freedom; Patriotism; American Flag; Liberty


THE AMERICAN HERO (A SAPPHIC ODE), by NATHANIEL NILES    Poem Text                
First Line: Why should vain mortals tremble at the sight of death and destruction
Last Line: Life is redoubled.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Bunker Hill, Battle Of; Freedom; Liberty


THE AMERICAN SOLDIER'S HYMN, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: Tis god that girds our armor on
Last Line: "and nations, strangers to his name, / shall thus be taught to sing his praise"
Subject(s): American Revolution;soldiers


THE ARMORER'S ERRAND; A BALLAD OF 1775, by JULIA CAROLINE RIPLEY DORR    Poem Text                
First Line: Where the far skies soared clear and bright
Last Line: He stormed with his comrades to share the fray!
Subject(s): Allen, Ethan (1738-1789); American Revolution; Soldiers


THE BALLAD OF BUNKER HILL, by EDWARD EVERETT HALE    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: We lay in the trenches we'd dug
Last Line: Home!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Bunker Hill, Battle Of


THE BALLAD OF DANIEL BRAY, by JOSEPH FULFORD FOLSOM    Poem Text                
First Line: The delaware, with stately sweep
Last Line: "he brought the boats to washington."
Subject(s): American Revolution; Delaware (river); Trenton, Battle Of (1776)


THE BATTLE OF BENNINGTON [AUGUST 16, 1777], by THOMAS P. RODMAN    Poem Text                
First Line: Up through a cloudy sky, the sun
Last Line: The best beloved die.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Bennington, Battle Of (1777)


THE BATTLE OF BUNKER HILL; COMPOSED BY A BRITISH OFFICER, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: "it was on the seventeenth, by break of day"
Last Line: "their heads for signs shall hang up high, / upon that hill call'd beacon"
Subject(s): "american Revolution;bunker Hill, Battle Of;


THE BATTLE OF EUTAW [SPRINGS], by WILLIAM GILMORE SIMMS    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Hark! 'tis the voice of the mountain
Last Line: Bears fruit for the vultures of fate!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Eutaw Springs, South Carolina


THE BATTLE OF KING'S MOUNTAIN, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: Twas on a pleasant mountain
Last Line: And may our good country / have quietude and wealth
Subject(s): "american Revolution;king's Mountain, Battle Of;


THE BATTLE OF KING'S MOUNTAIN, by PAUL HAMILTON HAYNE    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Ofttimes an old man's yesterdays o'er his frail vision pass
Last Line: What strength to feel, beyond our steel, burns the great captain's eye!
Subject(s): American Revolution


THE BATTLE OF LEXINGTON, by SIDNEY LANIER    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Then haste ye, prescott and revere!
Last Line: And died at the door of your house of fame
Subject(s): American Revolution; Lexington, Battle Of (1775); Concord, Battle Of


THE BATTLE OF MONMOUTH, by THOMAS DUNN ENGLISH    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Four and eighty years are o'er me
Last Line: Is their monument to-day, and for aye.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Monmouth, Battle Of (1778)


THE BATTLE OF MONMOUTH, by R. H.    Poem Text                
First Line: Whilst in peaceful quarters lying
Last Line: Welcome mirth, and fear farewell.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Monmouth, Battle Of (1778)


THE BATTLE OF MONMOUTH, by SARA KING WILEY    Poem Text                
First Line: In the grasses the cob-webs were lying
Last Line: They had vanished -- and monmouth was won!
Alternate Author Name(s): Drummond, Sarah King Wiley
Subject(s): American Revolution; Monmouth, Battle Of (1778)


THE BATTLE OF THE COWPENS, by THOMAS DUNN ENGLISH    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: To the cowpens, riding proudly, boasting lordly, rebels scorning
Last Line: Ha! No music like that crushing through the skull-bone to the brain.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Cowpens, Battle Of The (1781); North Carolina


THE BATTLE OF THE KEGS, by FRANCIS HOPKINSON    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Gallants, attend and hear a friend
Last Line: They'll make their boasts and brags, sir.
Variant Title(s): British Valor Displayed
Subject(s): American Revolution; Battleships; Great Britain - Civil War; Machinery & Machinists; Navy - United States; Patriotism; Soldiers; English Civil War; American Navy


THE BATTLE OF TRENTON, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: On christmas-day in seventy-six
Last Line: "let's touch the tankard while we can, / in memory of that day"
Subject(s): "american Revolution;trenton, Battle Of (1776);


THE BOASTING OF SIR PETER PARKER, by CLINTON SCOLLARD    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Twas the proud sir peter parker came sailing in from the sea
Last Line: The stars of victory burning bright over sullivan's sandy isle.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Charleston, South Carolina; Parker, Sir Peter (1721-1811)


THE BOMBARDMENT OF BRISTOL, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: In seventeen hundred and seventy-five
Last Line: And all their firing and their racket / shot off the topmast of a packet
Subject(s): "american Revolution;bristol, Rhode Island;


THE BRITISH PRISON-SHIP, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Amid these ills no tyrant dared refuse
Last Line: And his last efforts more than damn the first.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Hospitals; Navy - Great Britain; Prisons & Prisoners; Sea Battles; English Navy; Convicts; Naval Warfare


THE CAPTAIN'S DRUM; APRIL, 1775, by BENJAMIN FRANKLIN TAYLOR    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: In pilgrim land one sabbath day
Last Line: Has drummed its way across the age.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Enfield, Connecticut


THE CONGRATULATION, by JONATHAN ODELL    Poem Text                
First Line: Joy to great congress, joy an hundred fold
Last Line: Saint denis and saint tammany, go rot.
Subject(s): American Revolution - French Involvement; Clergy; Estaing, Jean Baptiste De (1729-1794); New York City - Revolutionary Period; Saints; Priests; Rabbis; Ministers; Bishops


THE COW-CHACE, by JOHN ANDRE    Poem Text                
First Line: To drive the kine one summer's morn
Last Line: Should ever catch the poet.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Caldwell, James (1734-1781); New Jersey; Soldiers; Wayne, Anthony (1745-1796)


THE CRUISE OF THE FAIR AMERICAN, by ARTHUR HALE    Poem Text                
First Line: The twenty-second of august
Last Line: And our good privateer.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Navy - United States; American Navy


THE DANCE, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: Cornwallis led a country dance
Last Line: "that while your hopes are danced away, / 'tis you must pay the piper?"
Subject(s): "american Revolution;cornwallis, Charles (1738-1805);war;yorktown Campaign (1781);


THE DAUGHTER'S REBELLION, by FRANCIS HOPKINSON    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: When fair columbia was a child
Last Line: As safely as in nurse's closet.
Subject(s): American Revolution


THE DEATH OF WARREN [JUNE 17, 1775], by EPES SARGENT    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: When the war-cry of liberty rang through
Last Line: "'t is sweet, oh, 't is sweet for our country to die!"
Subject(s): American Revolution; Bunker Hill, Battle Of; Warren, Joseph (1741-1775)


THE DESCENT ON MIDDLESEX, by PETER ST. JOHN    Poem Text                
First Line: July the twenty-second day
Last Line: The tories took me from the shore.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Middlesex, Connecticut


THE EVE OF BUNKER HILL [JUNE 16, 1775], by CLINTON SCOLLARD    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Twas june on the face of the earth, june with the rose's
Last Line: The men whose might made strong the height on the eve of bunker hill!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Bunker Hill, Battle Of


THE FATE OF JOHN [OR JACK] BURGOYNE, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: When jack the king's commander
Last Line: And be the fate of all her foes / the same as here recorded
Subject(s): "american Revolution;burgoyne, John (1722-1792);saratoga Campaign (1777);


THE FIELD OF THE GROUNDED ARMS, SARATOGA, by FITZ-GREENE HALLECK    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Strangers! Your eyes are on that valley fixed
Last Line: Their noblest monuments.
Alternate Author Name(s): Croaker
Subject(s): American Revolution; Saratoga Campaign (1777)


THE FIRST BATTLE OF THE REVOLUTION, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: "a century ago, on sterile land"
Last Line: And fair columbia won a diadem
Subject(s): "american Revolution;lexington, Battle Of (1775);" "concord, Battle Of;


THE FLOWER OF LIBERTY, by OLIVER WENDELL HOLMES    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: What flower is this that greets the morn
Last Line: The starry flower of liberty!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Flags - United States; Patriotism; American Flag


THE GREEN MOUNTAIN BOYS [MAY 9, 1775], by WILLIAM CULLEN BRYANT    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Here halt we our march, and pitch our tent
Last Line: For the deeds of to-morrow night.
Subject(s): Allen, Ethan (1738-1789); American Revolution; Soldiers; Ticonderoga, Battle Of (1775)


THE HANGING OF BLACK CUDJO (1780); A DIALECT BALLAD, by PAUL HAMILTON HAYNE    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Well, maussa! If you wants to heer, I'll tell you 'bout um 'true
Last Line: "but sabe dat gab to stuff de years of de next fool you meet!'"
Subject(s): American Revolution; Capital Punishment; Marion, Francis (1737-1795); Slavery; Hanging; Executions; Death Penalty; Serfs


THE KING'S OWN REGULARS & THEIR TRIUMPH OVER THE IRREGULARS, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: "since you all will have singing, and won't be said nay"
Last Line: "for if they beat us in the fight, we beat them in the race"
Subject(s): American Revolution


THE LITTLE BLACK-EYED REBEL, by WILLIAM MCKENDREE CARLETON    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: A boy drove into the city, his wagon loaded down
Last Line: Thought the little black-eyed rebel, with a twinkle in her eye.
Alternate Author Name(s): Carleton, Will
Subject(s): American Revolution


THE MARCHING SONG OF STARK'S MEN [AUGUST 15, 1777], by EDWARD EVERETT HALE    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: March! March! March! From sunrise till it's dark
Last Line: And to hear them thank our god for the day.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Bennington, Battle Of (1777); Stark, John (1728-1822)


THE MARYLAND BATTALION [AUGUST 27, 1776], by JOHN WILLIAMSON PALMER    Poem Text                
First Line: Spruce macaronis, and pretty to see
Last Line: And fair freedom is singing sweet home in the west.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Brooklyn Heights, Battle Of (1776); Patriotism; United States - Continental Army


THE MECKLENBURG DECLARATION, by WILLIAM C. ELAM    Poem Text                
First Line: Oppressed and few, but freemen yet
Last Line: To place on patriot brows the victor's crown!
Subject(s): American Revolution; North Carolina


THE MIDNIGHT CONSULTATIONS; OR A TRIP TO BOSTON, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Small bliss is theirs, whom fate's too heavy hand
Last Line: And she be glorious -- but ourselves as free!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Boston


THE MINUTEMEN OF NORTHBORO, by WALLACE RICE    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Tis noonday by the buttonwood, with slender shadowed bud
Last Line: And take the plough again in peace, their warrior's duty done.
Alternate Author Name(s): Groot, Cecil De
Subject(s): American Revolution; Lexington, Battle Of (1775); Concord, Battle Of


THE MODERN JONAS, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: You know there goes a tale
Last Line: "returned back, / from not one third their number"
Subject(s): "american Revolution;clinton, Sir Henry (1738-1795);new Jersey;


THE MOTHER COUNTRY, by BENJAMIN FRANKLIN    Poem Text                
First Line: We have an old mother that peevish is grown
Last Line: Which nobody can deny.
Subject(s): American Revolution


THE NATION'S DEAD, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: Four hundred thousand men
Last Line: "made this our ransomed soil their grave, / for me and you! / good friend, for me and you!"
Subject(s): American Revolution;holidays;memorial Day; Declaration Day


THE NORTHERN SOLDIER (2), by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: In vain you talk of fruits and flowers
Last Line: Our free-born limbs to bind.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Army - United States


THE PENNSYLVANIA SONG, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: We are the troop that ne'er will stoop
Last Line: "nor slaves nor cowards we will prove, / great britain shall soon see"
Subject(s): American Revolution;pennsylvania;soldiers


THE PRIZE OF THE MARGARETTA, by WILLIAM MCKENDREE CARLETON    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Four young men, of a monday morn
Last Line: That men may follow and boys may lead.
Alternate Author Name(s): Carleton, Will
Subject(s): American Revolution; Margaretta (ship); Navy - United States; Sea Battles; American Navy; Naval Warfare


THE PROGRESS OF SIR JACK BRAG, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: "said burgoyne to his men, as they passed in review"
Last Line: "tullalo, tullalo, tullalo-o-o-o, boys!"
Subject(s): "american Revolution;burgoyne, John (1722-1792);


THE REFUGEES' PETITION TO SIR GUY CARLETON, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Humbly sheweth, that your honour's petitioners, tories by trade
Last Line: We'll go to the rebels, and get our estates. --
Subject(s): American Revolution; Carleton, Sir Guy. 1st Baron Dorchester; Refugees


THE RIDE OF TENCH TILGHMAN [OCTOBER 17, 1781], by CLINTON SCOLLARD    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: They've marched them out of old yorktown, the vanquished red-coat host
Last Line: "the world turned upside down!"
Subject(s): American Revolution; Tilghman, Trench (1744-1786); Yorktown Campaign (1781)


THE RIFLEMAN'S SONG AT BENNINGTON, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: "why come ye hither, stranger [or, redcoat]?"
Last Line: "if flint and trigger hold but true, / the quicker 'twill be done"
Subject(s): "american Revolution;bennington, Battle Of (1777);


THE ROYAL ADVENTURER, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Prince william, of the brunswick race
Last Line: "I curse -- and quit the land."
Subject(s): American Revolution; William Iv, King Of England (1765-1837)


THE SOLDIER'S PRAYER, by ELIZABETH MARGARET CHANDLER    Poem Text                
First Line: I care not for the hurried march through august's burning noon
Last Line: But I must die -- must waste away beneath this inward strife,
Subject(s): American Revolution


THE SOUTH CAROLINA, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: My dear brother ned
Last Line: "she will us attend, / for the south carolina we've lost"
Subject(s): American Revolution;navy - United States;sea Battles;south Carolina (ship); American Navy;naval Warfare


THE STORMING OF STONY POINT [JULY 16, 1779], by ARTHUR GUITERMAN    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Highlands of hudson! Ye saw them pass
Last Line: "over the parapet, ""spear in hand!"
Subject(s): American Revolution; New York City - Revolutionary Period; Soldiers; Stony Point, Battle Of (1779); Wayne, Anthony (1745-1796)


THE STORY OF SEVENTY-SIX, by WILLIAM CULLEN BRYANT    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: What heroes from the woodland sprung
Last Line: Profaned the soil no more.
Variant Title(s): Seventy-six: American War Of Independence
Subject(s): American Revolution; Patriotism


THE SURPRISE AT TICONDEROGA [MAY 10, 1775], by MARY ANNA PHINNEY STANSBURY    Poem Text                
First Line: Twas may upon the mountains, and on the airy wing
Last Line: Shine the names of ethan allen and his bold volunteers!
Subject(s): Allen, Ethan (1738-1789); American Revolution; Courage; Soldiers; Ticonderoga, Battle Of (1775); Valor; Bravery


THE SWAMP FOX, by WILLIAM GILMORE SIMMS    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: We follow where the swamp fox guides
Last Line: He fears, and flies from marion's men.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Marion, Francis (1737-1795); Patriotism; South Carolina


THE TRIUMPHAL ARCH; REJOICINGS IN PHILADELPHIA, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Toward the skies
Last Line: And heaven with pleasure views its works no more.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Independence; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania


THE TROOPERS (1778), by CLINTON SCOLLARD    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: We clattered into the village street, and up to the rose and crown
Last Line: "but death to a thing like a tyrant king, and his vassal, my great lord howe!"
Subject(s): American Revolution; Great Britain - Rulers; Howe, Richard. Earl Howe (1726-1799); Presidents, United States; Washington, George (1732-1799)


THE WALLABOUT MARTYRS, by WALT WHITMAN    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Greater than memory of achilles or ulysses
Last Line: The stepping stones to thee to-day and here, america.
Subject(s): American Revolution; New York City - Revolutionary Period


THE WYOMING MASSACRE, by URIAH TERRY    Poem Text                
First Line: Kind heaven, assist the trembling muse
Last Line: Of cruel tyranny.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Massacres; Native Americans; Wyoming, Pennyslvania; Indians Of America; American Indians; Indians Of South America


THE YANKEE MAN-OF-WAR (2), by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: Tis of a gallant yankee ship that flew the stripes and stars
Last Line: Down the north channel paul jones did steer just at the break of day
Subject(s): "american Revolution;jones, John Paul (1747-1792);navy - United States;ranger (ship);" American Navy


THE YANKEE PRIVATEER, by ARTHUR HALE    Poem Text                
First Line: Come listen and I'll tell you
Last Line: For the yankee privateer!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Navy - United States; Patriotism; Privateers; Providence (ship); Whipple, Abraham (1733-1819); American Navy


THE YANKEE'S RETURN FROM CAMP [JUNE, 1775], by EDWARD BANGS    Poem Text                
First Line: Father and I went down to camp
Last Line: Locked up in mother's chamber.
Variant Title(s): Yankee Doodle
Subject(s): American Revolution; United States - Continental Army


TICONDEROGA, by V. B. WILSON    Poem Source                
First Line: The cold, gray light of the dawning
Last Line: Of the capture of old carillon, %the chime of the silver bells
Subject(s): American Revolution; Fourth Of July; Patriotism


TO LAURA, ON THE FRENCH FLEET PARADING BEFORE PLYMOUTH, 1779, by ANN THOMAS    Poem Text                
First Line: Our ears were stunned with noisy drum
Last Line: I'll only say I am thy friend.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Fraser, Simon (1726-1782); Navy - France; French Navy


TO LORD CORNWALLIS, AT YORK, VIRGINIA, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Hail great destroyer (equalled yet by none)
Last Line: The plundering servant of a bankrupt king.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Cornwallis, Charles (1738-1805)


TO THE AMERICANS ON THE APPROACH OF THE HESSIAN FORCES, 1775, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: The hour draws nigh, the glass is almost run
Last Line: Hell must prevail, if britain gains the day.
Subject(s): American Revolution


TO THE BOSTON WOMEN, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: "o boston wives and maids, draw near and see"
Last Line: "if not, we'll cut your throats, and burn your town"
Subject(s): American Revolution;boston;women


TO THE MEMORY OF THE BRAVE AMERICANS UNDER GENERAL GREENE, by PHILIP FRENEAU    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: At eutaw springs the valiant died
Last Line: A brighter phoebus of their own.
Variant Title(s): Eutaw Springs
Subject(s): American Revolution; Eutaw Springs, South Carolina; Greene, Nathaniel (1742-1786); Patriotism; Soldiers


TOM GAGE'S PROCLAMATION, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: Whereas the rebels hereabout
Last Line: "by command of mother cary,"
Subject(s): "american Revolution;gage, Thomas (1721-1787);


TORY PARODY OF 'THE BRAVE AMERICANS ALL' SONG, by UNKNOWN    Poem Source                
First Line: Come, shake your dull noddles, ye pumpkins, and bawl
Last Line: Protected and free %in folly, etc
Subject(s): American Revolution; Courage; Freedom


TRENTON AND PRINCETON, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: "on december, the sixth"
Last Line: "both officers and privates, / who liberty pursue"
Subject(s): "american Revolution;princeton, Battle Of (1777);trenton, Battle Of (1776);


ULYSSES AND COLUMBUS, by ALFRED WILLIAM WINTERSLOW DALE    Poem Text                
First Line: Not over violet seas that rise and fall
Last Line: Earning their freedom with free heart and soul.
Subject(s): American Revolution


UNDER THE OLD ELM; READ AT CAMBRIDGE ON 100TH ANNIVERSAY ..., by JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Words pass as the wind, but where great deeds were done
Last Line: Virginia, fitly named from england's manly queen!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Cambridge, Massachusetts; Presidents, United States; Washington, George (1732-1799)


UNDER THE WASHINGTON ELM, CAMBRIDGE, by OLIVER WENDELL HOLMES    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Eighty years have passed, and more
Last Line: Was bright on our brave old tree!
Subject(s): American Revolution; Elm Trees


VERSES INVITING STELLA TO TEA ON THE PUBLIC FAST DAY, 1781, by ANNA SEWARD    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Dear stella, midst the pious sorrow / our monarch bids us feel tomorow
Last Line: Twas vanquished britain's laurel-water!'
Alternate Author Name(s): Seward, Nancy
Variant Title(s): Verses Inviting Mrs. C- To Tea On A Public Fast-day, 1791
Subject(s): American Revolution; Fasts & Feasts; Patriotism


VIRGINIA BANISHING TEA, by UNKNOWN    Poem Source                
First Line: Begone, pernicious baneful tea
Subject(s): American Revolution; Food And Eating; Tea


VOLUNTEER BOYS, by UNKNOWN    Poem Source                
First Line: Hence with the lover who sighs o'er his wine
Last Line: But health and success to the volunteer %boys
Subject(s): American Revolution; Courage; Military Service, Voluntary; Soldiers


WAGONER OF THE ALLEGHANIES, SELS., by THOMAS BUCHANAN READ    Poem Source                 Poet's Biography
Subject(s): American Revolution; Holidays; Memorial Day; Patriotism


WAR AND WASHINGTON, by JONATHAN MITCHELL SEWALL    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Vain britons, boast no longer with proud indignity
Last Line: Pay homage to america and glorious washington!
Subject(s): American Revolution


WAR AND WASHINGTON, by UNKNOWN    Poem Source                
First Line: Vain britons, boast no longer with proud indignity
Subject(s): American Revolution


WARREN'S ADDRESS [TO THE AMERICANS] [AT BUNKER HILL] [JUNE 17, 1775], by JOHN PIERPONT    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Stand! The ground's your own, my braves!
Last Line: Of his deeds to tell?
Variant Title(s): Warren's Address To The American Soldiers
Subject(s): American Revolution; Bunker Hill, Battle Of; Fourth Of July; Freedom; History; Patriotism; United States - History; War; Warren, Joseph (1741-1775); Independence Day; Liberty; Historians


WASHINGTON BY THE DELAWARE, by CINCINNATUS HEINE MILLER    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: The snow was red with patriot blood
Last Line: Think, think of washington!
Alternate Author Name(s): Miller, Joaquin
Subject(s): American Revolution; Courage; Delaware (river); Trenton, Battle Of (1776); Valor; Bravery


WASHINGTON'S OVENS, ADAMSES' LETTERS, by ALBERT GOLDBARTH    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: There are stories in which the food is so here
Subject(s): Food & Eating; American Revolution


WAYNE AT STONY POINT [JULY 16, 1779], by CLINTON SCOLLARD    Poem Text                 Poet's Biography
First Line: Twas the heart of the murky night, and the lowest ebb of tide
Last Line: Than his charge on stony point in the heart of the murky night.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Soldiers; Stony Point, Battle Of (1779); Wayne, Anthony (1745-1796)


WHAT A COURT HATH OLD ENGLAND (WITH MUSIC), by UNKNOWN    Poem Source                
First Line: What a court hath old england
Last Line: And we'll die down in defense of the rights of the land. %derry down, down, down derry down
Subject(s): American Revolution


WHAT'S IN A NAME?, by HELEN F. MORE    Poem Text                
First Line: I am a wandering, bitter shade
Last Line: He was revere and I was dawes.
Subject(s): American Revolution; Dawes, William (1745-1799); Revere, Paul (1735-1818)


YANKEE DOODLE'S EXPEDITION TO RHODE ISLAND, by ANONYMOUS    Poem Text                
First Line: "from lewis, monsieur gerard, came"
Last Line: "for clinton's name alarmed his mind, / and made him stir his stumps, sir"
Subject(s): "american Revolution;navy - France;newport, Rhode Island;" French Navy